PoLoop Angielski

Jacek Olender

This is a podcast for intermediate learners of English, especially my students, current and those I taught in the past. Since most of them are Polish, it was originally designed with Polish learners in mind. However, with new technology and methods of communication, allowing me to work with students from various parts of the world, the podcast has quickly evolved, and is no longer aimed at one particular nationality. The majority of my listeners are not even my students. The original goal, however, remains the same: providing learners of English with advice and listening material that could help them on their way from the intermediate to the advanced level of English language competence - the route I followed too. read less

Episode 21. Are you a Lumper or a Splitter?
Jan 7 2023
Episode 21. Are you a Lumper or a Splitter?
When it comes to learning a language, are you a lumper or a splitter? Which approach is better for learners of a foreign language?You can download the complete transcript of this episode here.Key terms used in the recording: to lump: to put things together in the same group and consider them as the same even though there are differences between themto split: to put similar things in different categories; to focus on differences between things rather than similaritiesOther words and phrases used in the recording (in alphabetical order): armoury: skills or powers that are available for someone if they need to use itcontinual: continuing without stopping or happening again and again, often in an annoying wayto convey a meaning: to communicate an ideato do justice to something: to represent something fairly, especially in a way that shows how good or attractive something isa fossilised error: an error that is fixed and difficult to get rid ofa groundbreaking theory: a theory that changes the way we understand things; theory that leads to new discoveriesto feel superior: to feel better than someone elsehair-splitting: arguing about unimportant details or differencesinsight: a deeper understanding of what something is likeinquisitively: showing interest; wanting to learn thingsthe latter: the second of the two things that have just been mentionedto mansplain something: When a man mansplains something, he explains it to a woman in a way that shows he knows more about it than she does.matter-of-fact: said or done without showing emotiona merger of two words: a word created from combining two separate wordsminutiae: very small or unimportant detailsa nitpicking perfectionist: a person who focuses on small unimportant details trying to do things perfectlymisinterpretation: a wrong way of understanding of a messagenuanced: taking account of small but important differencesto overthink something: to think about something too muchto pay off: to bring some benefit; to be advantageouspeckish: a little bit hungryto ponder something: to think carefully about something for a long timeto reason with sb: to talk to someone trying to convince them or persuade them to do somethingto retaliate: to attack someone because they've attacked you firsta shift: a change in something, for example in someone's ideas or methodsto tell something apart: to see the difference between two things that are very similartrout: a fish that lives in rivers and lakesturquoise: bright green-blue in colourthe upper hand: an advantage over someone or somethingFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 20. New Year's Resolutions
Jan 1 2023
Episode 20. New Year's Resolutions
Let's kick off the new year with a few pieces of advice about the New Year's resolutions.You can download the complete transcript of this episode here.Words and phrases connected to the topic of New Year's resolutions: A FIRM RESOLUTION : a resolution that is not likely to changeTO MAKE A RESOLUTION : to decide to try very hard to do somethingTO KEEP A RESOLUTION / TO STICK TO A RESOLUTION : to continue trying very hard to do somethingTO FAIL ON A RESOLUTION : to stop trying very hard to do something Interesting words and expressions used in the recording: to be buzzing: to be full of energyjust a tad: just a little bitto have one too many: to drink too much alcoholhangover: headache and sick feeling that you have the day after drinking too much alcoholIt dawned on you: You suddenly realised somethingto take stock of your life: to stop and think carefully about your life so far, in order to decide what to do nextto give up / quit booze: to stop drinking alcoholthe festive season: Christmas and New Yearto be fed up with sth: bored and unhappy because something has continued for too longto dampen someone's spirtis: to make someone feel less determined or enthusiasticto piggyback on sth: to use something that already do as a support for something you want to doto give someone a piggyback: to give someone a ride on your back"the valley of disappointment" - the term James Clear uses to describe the initial period during which your hard effort doesn't bring the expected resultsto overcome difficulties: to successfully deal with difficultiesa cue: a thing that is a signal for somebody to do somethingto bundle something together: to group separate things togetherbits and bobs: small items of various kindsThis episode is based on insights from James Clear's book 'The Atomic Habits'.Takeaways:Tip 1: Set realistic goals.Tip 2: Combine the existing habit with a new one that brings you closer to achieving your goal.Tip 3: Join a group whose members pursue the same goal.Tip 4: Expect difficulties.Tip 5: Create the right environment, which will make it easier for you to stick to your resolution.For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 19. Gerunds with Phrasal Verbs
Dec 18 2022
Episode 19. Gerunds with Phrasal Verbs
Verbs sometimes want to act like adjectives or nouns. In order to take on their new role they need the -ing ending. In this episode I expose their clever trick :-)You can download the transcript of this episode here.Phrasal Verbs used in the recording: FEEL UP TO  sth/doing sth : When you don't feel up to something, you don't have enough strength or energy to do it or deal with it.GIVE something UP : If you give up something, you stop doing it or having it.COUNT ON something: If you count on something, you are sure something will happen.REIN something IN : If you rein something in, you start to control something.LAY somebody OFF : If a company lays off employees, it stops employing them because there is not enough. work for them to do.Other interesting words and expressions used in the recording: worthwhile: If something is worthwhile, it is important or enjoyable enough to spend time, money or effort ona pint: a pint of beerPegasus: a horse with wings from Ancient Greek and Roman storiesto give somebody a headache: to be a source of pain but also to annoy someoneto browse through the news: to look through the news storiesto rob somebody of something: to steal money or property from someoneto get into the swing of doing something: to get fully involved in an activityTakeaway 1: Verb+ing can form continuous tenses, or function like an adjective or a noun in a sentence. In this role, it is known as a gerund.Takeaway 2: After prepositions we generally use gerunds, and since Phrasal Verbs often end with prepositions, we use gerunds after them too.You can find Relevant Today phrases mentioned in the recording on my Instagram Profile.For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 18. The Lie
Dec 11 2022
Episode 18. The Lie
Is learning a foreign language as easy as some want us to believe? What are the consequences of thinking that you can learn a language without effort? Listen to find out, and while doing so, learn a few useful words and expressions.You can download the transcript of this episode here.EASY or DIFFICULT - expressions introduced in the recording: EFFORTLESS: Something that is effortless is done easily and well.A PIECE OF CAKE: If you think something is very easy to do, you can say it is a piece of cake. It is often used to stop people feeling worried about doing something they have to do. MASTERY: If you show mastery of a skill, you show that you have acquired it completely and have no difficulty doing something.DAUNTING: A task that is daunting makes you feel  afraid or less confident.PLAIN SAILING: If you say that a task was plain sailing, you mean that it was very easy.BREAK SWEAT: If you break sweat, you use a lot of effort.PUT EFFORT INTO SOMETHING: If put effort into something, you use physical or mental energy to do it.Other interesting words and expressions used in the recording: to get round to something - to find time to do somethinga procrastinator - someone who often puts off doing thingsto spread a lie - to tell a lie to a lot of peopleto boost one's motivation - to make one's motivation strongera big fat lie - a complete liecomprehensible - that can be understood by somebodysimultaneously - happening at the same timeto come up with something - to produce, think, invent somethingto be encoded - to be changed into a from that could be processed (e.g by a brain, or computer)to be embedded - to be fixed firmly into somethingto lie through one's teeth - to say something that is completely untrueto serve a purpose - to have a specific goalthe waters turn up to be rough - the situation proves to be difficultgrit - courage and determination that makes it possible for somebody to continue doing something difficult or unpleasant for a long timeperseverance - the quality of keeping trying to achieve a particular aim despite difficultieslanguage aptitude - natural ability to learn a language to develop a growth mindset - to try to learn the skill through dedication and hard work; focusing on getting pleasure from the effort put into the task rather than from the future goalTakeaway 1: Learning a foreign language is not easy.Takeaway 2: Learners of a foreign language should focus less on achieving their long term goals, but instead develop a growth mindset, which will allow them to get pleasure from hard work.Link to Andrew Huberman's video on the subject.For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 17. Three-part Phrasal Verbs
Dec 4 2022
Episode 17. Three-part Phrasal Verbs
Three-part Phrasal Verbs are made of a verb, a particle and a preposition. In this episode you'll learn a few of them.You can download the transcript of this episode here.The list of three-part phrasal verbs introduced in the recording: get round to sth, get sth over with, feel up to sth, go in for sth,look forward to, put up with sth, talk down to sb.GET ROUND TO: When you get round to doing something you finally do what you have delayed doing or have been too busy to do.GET OVER WITH: If you want to get something unpleasant over with, you want to do it or finish experiencing it quickly, since you cannot avoid it.FEEL UP TO: When you don't feel up to something, you don't have enough strength or energy to do it or deal with it.GO IN FOR: If you go in for a particular activity, you decide to do it as a hobby or interest. It can also mean choosing something as your job.LOOK FORWARD TO: If you look forward to something, you want it to happen because you think you will enjoy it.PUT UP WITH: If you put up with something, you tolerate or accept it, even though you find it unpleasant or unsatisfactory.TALK DOWN TO: If someone talks down to you, they talk to you in a way that shows they treat you as if you are not very intelligent or very important.Other interesting words and expressions used in the recording: to stick in your memory, procrastination, a mundane task, a mere formality, chores, formalities, paperwork, to have a pint, to drag yourself out of bed, to hand in one's noticeTakeaway 1: Try learning phrasal verbs in the context of a story.Takeaway 2: Don't finish every email with: "I'm looking forward to hearing from you." Use alternatives, such as:  "Let me know what you think." "Keep me posted." "I hope to hear from you soon." "Please keep me informed of any developments." "I'm eagerly awaiting your response." "Your prompt response would be appreciated." For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 15. Inflation Collocations
Nov 20 2022
Episode 15. Inflation Collocations
Inflation  is one of the words that we can often hear these days. In this episode I'm looking at many collections with the word inflation, and share some insights how these collocations are influenced by the way we see inflation as a violent criminal, an illness, something that is out of control, and something that moves.Inflation is a PERSON: Our biggest ENEMY right now is inflation.Inflation could ROB many people OF their savings.The Turkish currency is being DESTROYED by inflation.Inflation has PINNED us TO the wall.  (If you pin someone to the wall you press them against the wall so they are unable to move).Inflation has ATTACKED the foundation of our economy.Inflation has OUTWITTED the best economic minds in the world.  (If you outwit someone, you defeat them or gain advantage over them because you are smarter than them.)Inflation is EATING UP our profits.Inflation can ATTACK us, HURT us, STEAL from us.We FIGTH, BEAT inflation, PROTECT people FROM inflation.the BATTLE AGAINST inflation / the FIGHT AGAINST inflationInflation is an ILLNESS: a BOUT of inflation (A bout is a an attack or period of illness) PL: atakInflation is something OUT OF CONTROL: a GALLOPING inflation a RUNAWAY inflation (A runaway car or horse is not under the control of its driver or rider.) PL: niekontrolowana inflacjaa RAGING inflation (A raging storm or a raging emotion can't be controlled.)to BRING/GET/KEEP inflation UNDER CONTROLto KEEP inflation IN CHECK (to keep something under control so that it doesn't spread or get worse.) PL: hamować, powstrzymywać inflacjęto CURB inflation (When you curb something, you limit it because it's bad.) PL: ograniczać / hamować inflacjęInflation is MOVING: Inflation can RISE / SOAR / REACH a certain levelInflation can FALL/DROPInflation can ACCELERATEWages can't KEEP PACE WITH / KEEP UP WITH / OUTPACE inflation.a SPIRALLING INFLATION (inflation that is rising very quickly) PL:  inflcja wzrastająca w szybkim tempieOther inflation phrases:(about inflation) to PLATEAU OUT  (to stay at a steady level after a period of rising) PL: ustabilizować sięto FUEL inflation (to make the inflation worse) PL: napędzać inflacjęOther words and expressions used in this episode:a bunch of something  (a large amount of something or a large number of something) PL: mnóstwo czegośa thug  (a violent person, especially criminal) PL: zbir, oprych, łobuzan adversary  (an opponent, a person that somebody is opposed to and competing with an argument or a battle) PL: przeciwnik, adwersarzFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 14. How to Learn Phrasal Verbs
Nov 13 2022
Episode 14. How to Learn Phrasal Verbs
Phrasal Verbs are a challenge to learners of English. They are difficult to master, but learning them is definitely worth the effort. In this episode, which is the first one in the series about Phrasal Verbs,  I recommend looking at them not as a random combinations of verbs and particles, but trying to discover what lies behind such combinations. To illustrate this, we will discover and practise how UP is used in Phrasal Verbs to stress the idea of completing or finishing something.Sentences used as examples:COME INWhat time does your train come in?Short skirts are coming in.COME ROUNDIt took me a long time to come round.Meanings of come round:1. to come to a place, especially somebody's home, to visit for a short time2. to change your opinion3. to become conscious againPhrasal Verbs with UP:tidy updrink upeat upheat uppack updry upuse upheal upOther words and expressions in this episode:the sheer number of something  (The word sheer is used to stress that the size, amount of something is huge. In here, the very number of Phrasal Verbs is huge.) PL: sama liczba / sama ilość czegośdaunting  (Something that is daunting makes you feel slightly afraid or worried about dealing with it.) PL: zniechęcający, przytłaczającyambiguous  (If you describe something as ambiguous, you mean that it is unclear or confusing because it can be understood in a few ways.) PL: wieloznaczny, dwuznacznyrandom  (If something is random, it doesn't show any pattern or rule.) PL: przypadkowy, losowyFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 13. Working From Home While Sick
Nov 6 2022
Episode 13. Working From Home While Sick
We've got autumn. A colder weather has settled in, so it is time to revise some expressions about illnesses and their symptoms, but doing it out of context would be dead boring, so listen to what a recent study says about the link between working from home and taking time off work because of sickness.Expressions about illness and its symptoms: to feel under the weather / to feel off colour (When you feel under the weather or off colour, you feel slightly ill.) PL: czuć się kiepskoa sore throat (When you have a sore throat, you feel pain your throat) PL: bolące gardłoa splitting headache (a very strong headache) PL: straszny bbl głowyto come down with a cold (When you are coming down with a cold, you start to feel symptoms of an illness that is not serious.)  PL: zachorować na cośto take a sick day / to call in sick / to phone in sick (When you take a sick day you don't go to work because you are ill.) PL: wziąć zwolnienie z pracy ze względu na chorobęa sick note (a document from a doctor confirming that you can't work because you are ill.) PL: zwolnienie lekarskieto sniffle / to have the sniffles (to have a cold) PL: być przeziębionymcough (one of the symptoms of a cold, when you force out air suddenly and noisily through your throat) PL: kaszelto feel dizzy (If you feel dizzy, you feel that you are losing your balance and are about to fall.) PL: mieć zawroty głowyto pass out (If you pass out, you faint or collapse.) PL: stracić przytomność, zemdlećOther words and expressions you might want to learn:to face a dilemma (When you face a dilemma, you need to choose one of two options.) PL: stanąć przed dylematemin the good old days  (at the time when you things were better than now) PL: w dawnych lepszych czasacha no-brainer  (a problem that is easy to solve) PL: jasna sprawa; prosty problem do rozwiązaniato binge on something  (When you binge on something you use too much of it.) PL: robić coś nieustannie, bez przerwy, na okrągłoto expose someone to something (to put someone in a situation where they are not protected from something harmful or unpleasant); PL: wystawiać kogoś na coś szkodliwegowrapped (up) in a blanket (covered with a blanket); PL: owinięty kocemcountless Zoom meetings (too many Zoom meetings to be counted); PL: niezliczone spotkania na Zoomieto raise the bar (to set a new, higher standard for something); PL: podwyższyć poprzeczkęto be out of the game (to no longer have a chance of succeeding in something)  PL: wypaść z grya bit of common sense (a small amant of ability to think about things in a practical way and make sensible decisions) PL: odrobina zdrowego rozsądkuLink to the article this podcast is based on: It is becoming harder to take off a sick day (The Economist - 13 October 2022)For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 12. The Crown - History or Fiction?
Oct 30 2022
Episode 12. The Crown - History or Fiction?
Is the Netflix hit drama series a historical account or a fictitious story? With the fifth season of the The Crown scheduled for release on the 9th of November, the question returns. What's more, there are important voices criticising the new season for being particularly unkind towards the royal family and the late queen.  While listening to me talking about this controversy, you will learn three adjectives ending with the -ous suffix and hopefully become more confident talking about the topic.Three adjectives with -ous suffix introduced in the recording:malicious (When you describe words or actions as malicious, you know they were said or done with intention to harm people, their reputation, or make them embarrassed or upset.) PL: złośliwe, nikczemne, w złym zamiarzevicious (A vicious person is violent and cruel; a vicious comment or action is intended to upset someone.) PL: złośliwe, nikczeme, złośliwe, nienawistneinvidious (If you describe your situation, task or job as invidious, you want to say that it is unpleasant because it will probably make you unpopular.) PL: niewdzięcznaOther words and expressions used in the recording worth you attention:the barrel-load of nonsense (a lot of untrue or silly things) PL: sterta bzdurto abdicate  (If a king or queen abdicates, he or she gives up being king or queen); PL: abdykowaćto throw a child into care  (If children are thrown into care, they are taken away from their parents because they can't look after them properly) - umieścić dziecko w ośrodku opiekuńczo-wychowawczym to slur  (If someone slurs, their speech is not clear because they don't pronounce each word clearly, usually when they are drunk, ill, or sleepy. ); PL: bełkotać niezrozumiale a dysfunctional family (A dysfunctional family is one that is not functioning normally or properly); PL: dysfunkcyjna rodzinathe breakdown of someone's marriage (the end of someone's marriage); PL: rozpad małżeństwato be under a barrage of criticism (When you are under a barrage of criticism, a lot of people criticise you); PL: być pod nawałem krytykia disclaimer (A disclaimer is a statement in which a person or company says that they are not responsible for something, in this case, that Netflix is not responsible for presenting the truth); PL: dementi, sprostowanieto vilify someone (If you are vilified by someone, they say or write very unpleasant things about you.)  PL: oszkalować kogośa lucrative deal (a profitable transaction) PL: lukratywny, intratny interesevents from the distant past (events from long ago) PL: wydarzenia z dalekiej przeszłościcontemporary events (events from the present time) PL: współczesne, bieżące wydarzeniaIn case you didn't understand Prince Charles's words because of my bad imitation of his way of speaking, here's the quote: "If we were an ordinary family and social services came to visit, they would have us thrown into care and you into jail." A good example of the second conditional structure! (Sorry, couldn't help reminding you -  teacher's habit :-)For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 11. Time is Money - on how to learn collocations using extended metaphors
Oct 23 2022
Episode 11. Time is Money - on how to learn collocations using extended metaphors
Learning collocations is a great way to expand your vocabulary. We can do it more effectively understanding how metaphors work in everyday language.Words and expressions used in the recording:pay off (If something pays off, it is brings good results)' PL: opłacać sięto learn collocations one by one (to learn collocations separately, not together); PL: jeden po drugim / jedna po drugiejIt could be argued that ...  (There is evidence to believe that something is true); PL: można twierdzić / utrzymywać, żeto grasp an object  (to take an object and hold it in your hand very firmly); chwycić coś to grasp an idea  (to understand an idea); PL: pojąć / zrozumieć ideę to live by something (When you live by a principle or a belief, you follow it in your life); PL: żyć zgodnie z czymśIt's slipped my mind (I've forgotten to do something); PL: Wypadło mi to z głowy.to cram for the exam (to learn as much as possible in a short time just before you take the exam); PL: wkuwać do egzaminuto encapsulate something (to represent the most important aspects of something); PL: zawierać cośSentences used as examples of how expressions about money could be used about time:You're wasting my time!This application will save me hours.I don't have enough time to spare for watching Netflix.How do you spend your weekends?I've invested a lot of money in your education, and you want to become an influencer!I lost a lot of time looking for the right dress.We are running out of time.That flat tyre cost me an hour.You need to budget your time.It will be worth your while to participate in the meeting.Our government is living on borrowed time.For more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 10. Find out why the Japanese love wearing face masks so much that many of them can't kick the habit.
Oct 16 2022
Episode 10. Find out why the Japanese love wearing face masks so much that many of them can't kick the habit.
W czasie pandemii Japończyków nie trzeba było specjalnie nakłaniać do noszenia maseczek ochronnych. Zwyczaj osłaniania ust był w Japonii dobrze zakorzeniony na długo przed  wybuchem Covid-19.  Okazuje się, że po pandemii, wielu mieszkańców kraju kwitnącej wiśni nie tylko boryka się z powikłaniami po przebytej grypie, ale  również uzależnieniem od noszenia maseczek ochronnych. W tym odcinku mówię o tym, czego dowiedziałem się na ten temat z artykułu opublikowanego w The Economist. Przy okazji przedstawiam w nim wyrażenia związane z nawykami, przyzwyczajeniami i nie tylko.Link do artykułu : Cover Story (6 Oct, 2022)Słowa i wyrażenia, które usłyszysz w nagraniu. Tutaj możesz pobrać pełną listę do wydrukowania.to crack on with something (If you want to crack on to something, you want to quickly move on to doing something.)stylish, fancy, trendy (All theses words mean that something is fashionable and attractive.)of all people (If you add the phrase 'of all people' after a name, you want to say that you are surprised that it is this very person who did or does something.)to overcome addiction (When you overcome addiction, you win against addiction.)to kick the habit (When you kick the habit, you stop doing something harmful.) to rush something (When you rush something, you do it quickly without thinking about it carefully.)to take a lot of courage to do something (If you say that something takes a lot of courage, it needs some effort.)to ditch something (When you ditch masks, you stop wearing them.)to precede something (If one event precedes another, it happens before it.)to be allergic to pollen (When you are allergic to pollen you become ill when you are in contact with pollen.)hay fever (If someone is suffering from hay fever, they sneeze and their eyes itch, because they are allergic to grass or flowers.)to have the sniffles (If you have the sniffles you suffer from a slight cold.)enforce the mask mandate (When the government enforces the mask mandate, they impose the law that makes people wear a mask.)to embrace something (If you embrace something, you accept it.)regardless of medical advice or rules (If people do something regardless of medical advice or rules, they do it even when medical advice or rules tell them not to do so.)social conformity (Social conformity means behaving in the same way as most other people.)to buck the trend (When you buck the trend, you oppose or resist it.)to follow the trend (When you follow the trend, you imitate others who set the trend.)individualistic (Someone who is individualistic likes to think and do things in their own way instead of imitating others)to conform (If you conform, you behave in the way that you are expected or supposed to behave.)a defect (A defect is a fault or imperfection)spots (Spots are small,  coloured areas on the surface of your skin.)crooked teeth  (not straight teeth)wrinkled skin (full of lines because of old age or some damage to the skin)to get away with something (When you get away with something, you are not punished for it.)a fraud (someone whoFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 9. "With gas or without?" This is the question .... you should NOT ask - czyli o wodzie mineralnej z perspektywy paneuropejskiej.
Oct 9 2022
Episode 9. "With gas or without?" This is the question .... you should NOT ask - czyli o wodzie mineralnej z perspektywy paneuropejskiej.
W tym odcinku podzielę się informacjami jakie uzyskałem od moich słuchaczek o zamawianiu i konsumpcji wody mineralnej w różnych krajach Europy.  Opowiem również jak brak doświadczenia w zamawianiu wody mineralnej po angielsku w polskich restauracjach i hotelach sprawił, że przegrałem w zakładzie butelkę wódki. Dowiesz się również, że "z gazem czy bez", przetłumaczone bezpośrednio na angielski nie jest, wbrew pozorom, najlepszym pytaniem jakie kelner lub kelnerka może zadać klientowi.Słowa i wyrażenia, które usłyszysz w nagraniu:a definite proof  - niezbity dowódto take something for granted - przyjąć coś za pewnikby default - z automatuto object  - zaprotestowaćto take effort - wymagać wysiłkua six-pack of water - zgrzewka wodyto encounter a problem - napotkać problema tap - krantap water - woda z kranu, kranówkato make a bet - założyć sięto offer a bet - zaproponować zakładto accept a bet - przyjąć zakładto lose a bet - przegrać zakładto run a workshop - prowadzić warsztatyflatuence - wzdęcieubiquity of something - wszechobecność czegośThe hospitality industry - branża hotelarska i restauracyjnaThe staple vocabulary of foreign visitors to Poland - podstawowe słownictwo obcokrajowców odwiedzających PolskęNo i na koniec, najważniejsze:sparkling / fizzy / carbonated water  - woda gazowanastill / flat water  - woda niegazowanaFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook
Episode 7. O bardzo, aż za bardzo, popularnym angielskim słowie i jego zamiennikach
Oct 2 2022
Episode 7. O bardzo, aż za bardzo, popularnym angielskim słowie i jego zamiennikach
Słowo very to jedno ze słów najbardziej nadużywanych przez uczących się języka angielskiego.  Niektórzy poprzedzają tym przysłówkiem niemal każdy przymiotnik. W tym odcinku proponuję więc trzy sposoby, żeby uniknąć tak jaskrawego nadużycia, skądinąd, fajnego słowa.Oto te  sposoby:Możemy zostawić sam przymiotnik, a słowo very wyrzucić ze zdania.Możemy użyć mocniejszego przymiotnika, który z powodzeniem zastąpi very + słaby przymiotnik, np. zamiast very angry możemy powiedzieć furious.Możemy, w końcu, zamienić very na inny przysłówek wzmacniający znaczenie przymiotników, np. absolutely.Słowa i wyrażenia, które pojawiają się w podkaście:a gloomy, rainy  morning -  ponury, deszczowy poranekan overused word - zbyt często używane słowoto sound repetitive - mówić monotonnie, mówić z powtórzeniamito prevent someone from doing something - uniemożliwić komuś zrobienie czegoś efficient - wydajny, efektywnyto reach a goal - osiągnąć celto recall something - przypomnieć coś sobiea straightforward solution - proste rozwiązanieStrong adjectives przytoczone w nagraniu:ubiquitous - very commonfurious - very angrygorgeous - very beautifulpetrified - very scaredstarving - very hungrymassive, gigantic, huge - very bigIntensifying adverbs  przedstawione w odcinku:absolutelyutterlyhighlyridiculouslydeeplyWyrażenia z ćwiczenia:deeply shockedridiculously cheaphighly profitablehighly unusualabsolutely devastatedridiculously easydeeply hurtCheck out:  PoLoop Angielski BlogFor more, visit: PoLoop Angielski BlogDrop me a line: jacek@poloopangielski.plAnd join us on social media: Instagram and Facebook