PODCAST

The DGMT Learning Lunch

The DG Murray Trust

The Learning Lunch is an opportunity for NPO teams to be exposed to new ideas, discover what others are learning, and reflect on what that means for their own implementation and strategy. Visit www.learninglunch.dgmt.co.za for the full experience and to access the podcasts and instruction for a ±30-minute group reflection.

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The Learning Lunch - Leadership lessons from the Arch
Apr 28 2022
The Learning Lunch - Leadership lessons from the Arch
The late Archbishop Desmond Tutu, or the Arch as he is fondly referred to, once said on hope: “Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness” and on being a wise leader: “Wisdom is when you are able to use your experience for not repeating the mistakes that you have made or others have made. Wisdom is being able to affirm others and knowing that you are not a one-man band. Wisdom is recognising that others are wiser than you.”   Amidst trials both past and present for civil society, and with the Covid-19 pandemic amplifying these trials, this podcast seeks to reinstill hope. We focus on the wise leadership values of Archbishop Demond Tutu by speaking to those who worked closely with him in civil society. We examine how he handled moments of pressure and conflict from the opposition and within, and how he continued to be a beacon of light, mobilising groups and encouraging them forward even in the darkest moments in South African history. In this podcast, we will be speaking to two of the Arch’s colleagues, Edwin Arrison, who is the Arch’s long-time friend and Development Manager at the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation, as well as Phumi Nhlapho, who is the Chief Operating Officer at the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation. They talk about how it was to work with him and for him, what responsibilities come with being a servant leader, how organisations can remain consistent with practising good values and how to handle conflicting relationships between government, civil society and its beneficiaries.
The Learning Lunch - Leadership lessons from the Arch
Apr 28 2022
The Learning Lunch - Leadership lessons from the Arch
The late Archbishop Desmond Tutu, or the Arch as he is fondly referred to, once said on hope: “Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness” and on being a wise leader: “Wisdom is when you are able to use your experience for not repeating the mistakes that you have made or others have made. Wisdom is being able to affirm others and knowing that you are not a one-man band. Wisdom is recognising that others are wiser than you.”   Amidst trials both past and present for civil society, and with the Covid-19 pandemic amplifying these trials, this podcast seeks to reinstill hope. We focus on the wise leadership values of Archbishop Demond Tutu by speaking to those who worked closely with him in civil society. We examine how he handled moments of pressure and conflict from the opposition and within, and how he continued to be a beacon of light, mobilising groups and encouraging them forward even in the darkest moments in South African history. In this podcast, we will be speaking to two of the Arch’s colleagues, Edwin Arrison, who is the Arch’s long-time friend and Development Manager at the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation, as well as Phumi Nhlapho, who is the Chief Operating Officer at the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation. They talk about how it was to work with him and for him, what responsibilities come with being a servant leader, how organisations can remain consistent with practising good values and how to handle conflicting relationships between government, civil society and its beneficiaries.
The Learning Lunch - Systems thinking for social innovation
Apr 28 2022
The Learning Lunch - Systems thinking for social innovation
How can we explore and create new approaches for achieving a more equal society that tackles both social and environmental challenges? How can we reimagine social systems and institutions to bring about positive change? We need to start at the very beginning, by challenging the premises on which existing social structures are based.Systems thinking is about investigating what set of factors and interactions are contributing to or could contribute to a possible outcome. The world is complex, so our thinking should be complex as well. By making it a habit to consider and reconsider how our own role might be connected to others, we can mitigate impact and work together to create better solutions. Systems thinking is a great tool to remind us to always consider the bigger picture. While it's easy to see how to take things apart, it can be much more challenging to understand how the individual parts interact to make up the big picture. Before sitting down on your own or with a team to devise a project, make a change, or solve a problem, consider the different systems your ideas could impact.In this podcast, we share the most helpful lessons on systems thinking for social innovation from the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The Bertha Centre is an academic centre that works with leaders who are catalysts for social and economic change and human rights. The centre educates students, entrepreneurs and leaders in social innovation, social entrepreneurship, impact investing and systems change
The Learning Lunch - Exceptional storytelling with Embrace
Apr 28 2022
The Learning Lunch - Exceptional storytelling with Embrace
Storytelling can be used in the non-profit sector as a means of listening and sharing, gaining trust within your network and shaping how you move forward with your work. In this podcast, Embrace Movement for Mothers shares their unique best practices when it comes to storytelling and making the mother a powerful ally in their activism - not only in relation to the child but as a key player socially, economically and politically in South Africa. Embrace promotes a connected and thriving start to motherhood for every new mother in South Africa. They have adopted a people-driven approach to supporting mothers as the primary ‘simple, loving connection’ in their children’s life. A key part of this people-driven approach has been to instil a storytelling methodology that sheds light on the stories of willing mothers to build solidarity with the movement. A good example of this is in 2018, during Women’s Month, Embrace decided to tell the stories of 31 mothers over 31 days. Rumbi Goredema Görgens, Embrace Operations Manager writes, “In an effort to reclaim the public space of Women’s Month, littered as it is with pink-hued marketing ploys, we decided to find 31 women doing the always extraordinary and often mundane work of motherhood… When we began planning this campaign, we had a picture of the kinds of stories we wanted to find. We were looking for stories that are often on the margins. We were also looking to disrupt assumptions, for example, by telling the story of a teenage mom who is focused and is raising her child successfully, without state assistance. Some wise people in our network pointed out that by doing this, we were reducing participants to only some parts of their motherhood journeys. We would be narrowly framing stories that were not ours to frame. So we ditched our expectations, and we sought out existing circles of women and asked if we could bring them together for an honest conversation about motherhood. We found these circles in workplaces, leisure groups, support groups and other existing women-centred spaces… Within the stories, you will see the many faces and phases of motherhood in South Africa. You see women sharing the spectrum of their experiences, and, through their stories, fulfilling our collective yearning for connection with and support from other mothers.”This is just one example of how Embrace was able to listen to the mothers in their network and rethink how they had initially conceptualised this campaign. There is power in the organisation’s willingness to self-correct and be lifetime learners, and this is one of the things that leads them to have such open, honest, vulnerable and trusting relationships with the mothers in their organisation.In this podcast Rumbi Goredema Görgens, Embrace’s Operations Manager and Nonkululeko Mbuli their Communications and Advocacy Strategist, shares their best practices for ethical storytelling that takes others into the heart of other’s experiences and they give advice for making mothers powerful allies in activism.
The Learning Lunch - Theory U: Create the future
Nov 26 2021
The Learning Lunch - Theory U: Create the future
As civil society, we see ourselves as drivers of change. But, sometimes we can get so bogged down in the day-to-day humdrum of our work, that we lose our energy and drive to explore new terrain – to find new ways of doing things. We also sometimes lose sight of the inner progression that is happening in ourselves, and our role in manifesting the future.Developed by Otto Scharmer, Theory U is an approach to creating change based on a process of inner knowing and social innovation. Professor Scharmer says: “When you deal with managing change, the bulk of the job is moving people from a “silo view” to a “systems view” – or, as we would say, from an egosystem awareness to an eco-system awareness. In fact, what surprises me most is how reliably we can create conditions that allow for that kind of shift in awareness to happen. You can’t manufacture it. You can’t mould it like a piece of metal by hammering on it from the outside. But you can create a set of inner and outer conditions that allows a group, an organisation, or a system to make that move, to sense and see themselves from the emerging whole”. He continues: “There is a distinction between two types of cognition: normal (downloading from existing mental frameworks) versus a deeper level of knowing … to activate the deeper level of knowing, one has to go through a three-step process:  Observe - Become one with the situationRetreat - Go to the deeper source of knowing, Access that knowing and let it come to the surfaceAct - Act swiftly for the deeper knowingTo help us understand Theory-U, we spoke to Hans van der Veen, a Clinical Psychologist who founded the Klein Karoo U.lab, which is based on the principles of Theory U. The Klein Karoo U.lab has taken on interesting community projects, including a Theory-U process with one of the high schools in Oudtshoorn to see if the participants who were teachers, parents, learners, could create approaches that would bring positive change to the school. With Hans, is Lisl Barry, a parent at Oudtshoorn High School, who participated in that process and who shares her experience and what she thinks they achieved at Oudtshoorn High School by using the Theory-U process.Learn more here.
The Learning Lunch - Harnessing Thunder
Nov 26 2021
The Learning Lunch - Harnessing Thunder
Where lies our hope at the moment? The last two years have been challenging for civil society. The Covid-19 pandemic heightened the inequalities of South Africa and NPOs, as always, stepped in to offer a helping hand on the ground amidst a series of corruption reports and violent eruptions in KwaZulu-Natal. Individuals came together to do this while dealing with their own challenges within their organisations and their personal lives. To keep themselves going activists need to keep in touch with their vision for the wellbeing and prosperity of South Africans. However, in the context of South Africa at the moment, it feels as though the vision is becoming more and more out of reach.There has been an overwhelming sense of exhaustion this second year of the pandemic (2021), within civil society and within the general public. And while we have been trying to keep going, we have been dealing with feelings of disappointment with our government, guilt and pressure because we are not able to meet all the needs of our beneficiaries and hopelessness in our state overall. This podcast does not seek to provide solutions to the challenges that NPOs may have faced during the pandemic, but it seeks to reflect and acknowledge. We hope that this episode will help create some space for people to share honestly. We want to let civil society know that we see and value their hard work and that we understand that it has been difficult. In this episode Mam Ruby Motaung, Executive Director of TREE (Training and Resources in Early Education), who experienced a whirlwind of challenges in the last two years shares her story and what helped her to have hope and to keep going forward.  Dr David Harrison is the CEO of DGMT and in 2020 he wrote a book entitled Harnessing the Thunder which he dedicated to those who work in civil society organisations, who mobilised to protect and support families in distress during the Covid-19 crisis.  In the chapter Human Spirits, David says:“The next few years will be tough. There will be new storms and thunderous rumblings of discontent. But if we listen carefully, we will discern them as millions of voices asking to be heard, looking for opportunity, seeking to be part of our common future. And no matter how dire the present, we always stand on the cusp of new opportunity for ourselves and for our nation. We should not feel threatened by the rumblings, but find ways to channel them into a more inclusive and innovative society. The problems may loom large, but they can be overcome if we are willing to think simply and radically. And at its most radical, a caring and creative spirit is all that is required to harness the thunder.”In conversation with Mam Ruby, David shares his observations and insights to inspire us and give us hope in this Learning Lunch session.Learn more here.
The Learning Lunch - Keeping young people afloat
Nov 26 2021
The Learning Lunch - Keeping young people afloat
Many NGOs work with children and young people – and mostly with children and young people that grow up in exceptionally difficult circumstances. Poverty and inequality often form the backdrop to a difficult and painful childhood marred by toxic environments of violence and abuse that leave children and young people traumatised. Waves for Change is an NPO with a very specific approach to dealing with trauma in children. Waves for Change share practical advice for all of us who might work with children or young people who are traumatised – whether that is the core focus of our work or not. Often our core work as an NPO is not necessarily to deal with the trauma of children, we might try to teach them reading, or we might provide school tutoring, but in the process, we discover how traumatised they are. We also may discover that, depending on the severity of their situation, we are often required to take specific action or at least to act in a very sensitive way, keeping in mind what they have been through and how it impacts their lives and their ability to do the work that we would like to do with them. Waves for Change (W4C) has been operating since 2011 and introduces surf therapy to underprivileged children. Founder Apish Tshetsha, who  leads the Waves for Change programme in Masiphumelele township, will explain how W4C approaches their work with young people, and Sinda Thakathani, who started off as one of the children participating in the W4C programme, but is now a W4C instructor and the first black South African to represent South Africa in an international surfing competition, will talk about his personal experience being supported through W4C and together Apish and Sinda will provide helpful advice to all of us who find ourselves in a position where we need to provide support to traumatised children and young people.Learn more here.