PODCAST

Food Revolution

Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative

Food Revolution brings you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we’re building tribal sovereignty through food - and we’ve set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be a part of the Food Revolution. Produced by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty initiative, with new episodes every other week.

Making Modern Indigenous Food: A Conversation with Kim Tilsen-Brave Heart
Matte chats with Kimberly Tilsen-Brave Heart, a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the owner of Painted Skye Management and owner and Head Chef at Etiquette Catering Co. in Rapid City, SD. Kim is an entrepreneurship and economic development specialist, facilitator, public speaker, trainer, entertainment manager, and chef. In this episode they talk about food as medicine, how to change your mindset around cooking, and indigenous modern cuisine.  Complete transcript available here. Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc Intro Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.   Matte 00:00:29 Hi, this is Matte Wilson, back with another episode of the Food Revolution. This week, we're meeting with Kim Tilsen-Brave Heart. Kim, thank you for joining us today. Can you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you and your background?   Kim 00:00:44 Sure. Um, good afternoon, everybody. I'm Kimberly Tilson-Brave Heart. I'm an enrolled citizen of the Oglala Lakota Sioux tribe located on the Pine Ridge Reservation here in South Dakota. I'm the executive chef and owner of Etiquette Catering. We are an artisan indigenous modern kitchen located downtown Rapid City. And I am also an entrepreneurial specialist. I have been helping other people develop their small businesses for the last fifteen years and I am a mother of three.   Matte 00:01:15 Awesome. I love seeing your posts on Facebook. Your charcuterie boards are so, so pretty. I just love it.   Kim 00:01:25 Thank you. Thank you. Yeah, they, um, I feel really lucky, um, because the charcuterie board really helped us like transition and pivot during the pandemic, you know, ‘cause we are a very primarily events based business and when COVID hit, it was like this, everyone was calling and canceling their weddings and their reunions and all their big events. And our business went from being extremely profitable to like bleeding out money. And I tried to think of like, what could I do that is still very Etiquette and my aesthetic, but also my quality of food in a way that the average person could have it every day and you know, at least once a week. And so I kind of came up with like the charcuterie to go and it kept our doors open and that's why we're still in business. Otherwise I think we would
Jun 14 2021
21 mins
Indigenous Food Sovereignty: A Conversation with Foster Cournoyer-Hogan
In this episode of Food Revolution, our host Matte Wilson talks to Foster Cournoyer-Hogan, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe from Parmalee. Foster currently works with the Initaitive as an intern through our WIK program (Waicahya Icagapi Kte, or They Will Grow into Producers, our year long internship for tribal members who are interested in becoming food producers). He talks about finishing up his senior year at Stanford University and future plans, how he became involved with the Food Sovereignty Iniative, and what he's learned about growing and wild harvesting over the past few years.  Complete transcript available here. Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donatingto the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc Intro Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.   Matte 00:00:29 All right. So I'm here with Foster Cournoyer-Hogan. Um, Foster, can you introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about your background.   Foster 00:00:35  Hau Mitakuyapi, cante waste nape ciyuzapelo. Foster Cournoyer-Hogan emaciyapelo. Hi, my name is Foster Cournoyer-Hogan, I am a senior at Stanford University graduating in a few weeks. Um, I'm from Parmalee and yeah, that's a little bit about me.   Matte 00:00:59 Cool. And for those of you who don't know, Foster’s been with the, um, with our organization, the Food Sovereignty Initiative for, um, for a number of years, um, Foster, tell us a little bit about how you got involved with our program.   Foster 00:01:12 Yeah, so my, I think I was a freshman, the summer of my freshman year of college. I was looking for a summer internship or summer job and came across this opportunity that the school offers to partner with any nonprofit. And so I was asking around like what I could do, where I could go, and I knew I wanted to come home for the summer, but I just didn't know where, where to be placed. So then someone made the connections with Mike [Mike Prate, Development Director of the Sicangu CDC and former FSI Director] and Mike was like, yeah, sure, come on. You know, we'd love to have you here. So then got placed with the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative and from there, and I came back the following year and I think last year was my first break. And then here I am again with the WIK internship.   Matte 00:02:10 Yeah. And so for those who don't know, um, our WIK internship Waicahya Icagapi Kte um, which is, um,
May 31 2021
16 mins
Food is Medicine: A Conversation with Vi Waln
In this episode of Food Revolution, host Matte Wilson chats with Vi Waln, a He Dog community member and the founder of the Lakota Wellness Society. Matte & Vi talk about pressing issues facing the Oyate, the idea of food as medicine, an Oceti Sakowin community fire cider project, and her work to provide wild medicinal and edible plants to relatives on the Rosebud.  Full transcript available here. Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc  Intro 00:00:00 Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate, the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.    In today's episode of food revolution, Matt chats with Vi Waln, a He Dog community member and the founder of the Lakota Wellness Society about pressing issues facing the Oyate, the idea of food as medicine, and her work to provide wild medicinal and edible plants to relatives on the Rosebud.  Matte Right Vi, can you introduce yourself to us? Tell us a little bit about your background   Vi 00:00:49 Mitakuyapi, cante waste nape ciyuzapi. Cante hunkeshniwe Emaciyap. My name is Viola Waln, everyone calls me Vi. I've lived on the reservation for most of my life. I live in the He Dog community, and I've spent a lot of years as a journalist, but now I've shifted my life purpose and we founded a nonprofit called Lakota Wellness Society, and we want to get more involved in food sovereignty and grow a hemp crop in the He Dog community. So that's basically what I'm doing now, Matte.   Matte 00:01:37 Awesome. Thank you. What inspired you to start Lakota Wellness Society?    Vi 00:01:42 Well, I have a big interest in traditional medicinal plants that grow he
May 18 2021
27 mins
Roasting Coffee on the Rosebud: A Conversation with Karen Moore of Wakalyapi Produce
In this episode of Food Revolution, Matte talks to Karen Moore, owner & operator of Wakalyapi Produce, a coffee roastery located on the Rosebud Reservation. Karen completed the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative's Waicahya Icagapi Kte (WIK, or They Will Grow Into Producers) adult internship program for tribal members interested in becoming local food producers & entrepreneurs in 2020, and shortly thereafter launched their business. Matte & Karen talk about how Karen got into coffee & started roasting, the different beans & roasts they've tried out, what it's like to launch a new business, and Karen's long-term plans to expand her business by growing coffee & ketogenic vegetables right here on the Rosebud.  You can order coffee from Karen here (and yes, they ship!)  Full episode transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc (Intro) 00:00:00 Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.   (Matte) 00:00:29 In today's episode, I'll be talking to Karen Moore, a Rosebud based food entrepreneur and the founder of Wakalyapi Produce. Karen completed the Food Sovereignty Initiative’s adult internship program in 2020, a year long paid program which teaches interested tribal members how to become food producers. Karen roasts coffee locally on the Rosebud Reservation, and we'll be talking with them about what it's been like to launch and grow their business today.  Can you introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about your background and about your business?   (Karen) 00:01:06 Sure. My name is Karen Moore, I'm an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and currently live in Mission, South Dakota. Um, my background, I, for most of my life, I grew up around here on the reservation in just different communities, um, and went to school and got my Associate's and Bachelor's in science from Sinte Gleska University and just worked like odd jobs here and there at the university. Um, I got an internship down in Virginia and then when I came back, I started working at the local coffee shop and that's really how I got introduced to coffee and like, how you don't have to add sugar and creamer to every cup to enjoy it. Um, and after a few
May 3 2021
18 mins
Coming Home to Rosebud: A Conversation with Deanna Eaglefeather
In today's episode, Matte talks Deanna Eaglefeather, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe who lives with her husband and four kids on a homesite east of Mission, SD on the Rosebud Reservation. Deanna shares how and why she made her way home to Rosebud after growing up in the Twin Cities, how she became interested in food sovereignty, growing food, and harvesting the wild foods of the prairie, some of her family's future plans for their homesite, and some tips for tapping boxelder (a species of maple) trees for sap to make syrup right here on the prairie.   Full episode transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc (Intro) 00:00:00 Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.   (Matte) 00:00:29 Hey everyone. This is Matte Wilson. Today we'll be talking to Deanna Eaglefeather about the path she and her family have taken to practice food sovereignty in their everyday lives. Later on in the episode, Dee is going to talk about tapping boxelder trees to make syrup, and walk us through that process a little bit. This episode was recorded in advance, so we wanted to let you know that the best time to tap trees for sap is in late February or early March, when the temperatures are above freezing during the day and below freezing at night.  While you're listening, we have a favor to ask. The Food Sovereignty Initiative is currently doing surveys to help us understand the experience our community members have around food, so that we can work towards building a more inclusive and equitable food system where everyone has access to healthy, fresh, local foods. Respondents will be entered into a drawing for cash prizes, with the chance to win up to $500. If you're interested, head over to our Facebook page, Sicangu Community Development Corporation, for more information and to access the survey. And now, back to the show.  (Survey available here. Please only complete it if you live on or within 30 miles of the Rosebud Reservation.)  (Matte) 00:01:30 Dee, wanna introduce yourself? Tell us a bit about your background, how you came to be living on Rosebud?  (Deanna) My name is Deanna Eaglefeather
Apr 19 2021
18 mins
Empowering Indigenous Youth: A Conversation with Marla Bull Bear of Lakota Youth Development
In this episode of Food Revolution, our host (& Director of the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative), Matte Wilson, talks to Marla Bull Bear, Executive Director of Lakota Youth Development. Lakota Youth Development, or LYD, has been empowering Lakota youth by providing programming that reconnects them to their indigenous identity for the last fifteen ears. LYD provides youth with opportunities to learn about gardening, beekeeping, entrepreneurship, and more. You can learn more about their work at www.lakotayouthdevelopment.org and support the program's youth entrepreneurs by purchasing honey and beeswax products at www.lakotahoneylodge.org.  Full episode transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc TikTok: @sicangucdc   (Intro) Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate- the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.   (Rooster crows) (Matte) All right, welcome back to another week of the Food Revolution. While you’re listening, we have a favor to ask. The Food Sovereignty Initiative is currently doing surveys to help us understand the experience our community members have around food, so that we can work towards building a more inclusive and equitable food system where everyone has access to healthy and fresh local foods. Respondents will be entered into a drawing for cash prizes, with the chance to win up to $500. If you’re interested, head to our Facebook page, Sicangu Community Development Corporation, for more information and to access the surveys. And now, back to the show. (You can access the survey here).  Today we'll be talking with Marla Bull Bear. Marla, can you introduce yourself please? Tell us a little bit about yourself, and your background, and what you do.   (Marla) Oh,
Apr 9 2021
12 mins
What Thanksgiving Means to Me: Reflections from our Native Community
Welcome to the Thanksgiving edition of Food Revolution! In this episode, we asked our Native community members to reflect on the question "What does Thanksgiving mean to you?" In response, we received reflections on the sacrifices Native ancestors made so that they and their descendants could survive, calls for the true history of Thanksgiving to be taught, reminders on the importance of families coming together to share a meal, and more.  Thank you all for listening & supporting Food Revolution during season one! We'll be taking a break for a bit before the launch of season two, but want to send a special thank you to all of our guests who have so generously shared their stories with us over the course of this season.  Full episode transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.orgFacebook: Sicangu Community Development CorporationInstagram: @sicangucdcTwitter: @sicangucdc   Matte (00:00:00) So this day is a day of remembrance. We remember our relatives and our ancestors, and all the hardships that they endured. We remember that even today, we are still going through challenges and struggles   Intro (00:00:12) Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the food revolution.   Mairi (00:00:41) Hey everyone. This is Mairi with the Food Sovereignty Initiative. You're listening to the Thanksgiving edition of Food Revolution, which will be our final episode of season one. Thank you all for supporting us this season, and a special thank you to our guests on the show for sharing your stories with us.  If you're listening to this, you probably know that the Thanksgiving story has been falsified and whitewashed throughout the history of the United States. (And for more on that, you can check out our blog post titled “Thanksgiving and Native Foodways: From 1621 to 2020” on our website, www.sicangucdc.org). But giving thanks was, and continues to be, a pillar of many Native cultures both before and after colonization.  For today's episode, we asked our Native community members to reflect on the question “What does Thanksgiving mean to you?” In response, we received reflections on the sacrifices that Native ancestors made so that they and their descendants could survive, calls for the true history of Thanksgiving to be taught, and reminders on the importance of families coming together to share a meal. Without further ado, I'll let Matte Wilson, the Food Sovereignty Initiative Director, kick us off.
Nov 25 2020
17 mins
Bringing the Bison Home to Rosebud: Jimmy Doyle on the Wolakota Buffalo Range Project
In this episode, Matte Wilson from the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative chats with Jimmy Doyle, Bison Manager of the Wolakota Buffalo Range. The Wolakota Buffalo Range is a collaboration between REDCO (the Rosebud Economic Development Corporation, the economic development arm of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe), the World Wildlife Fund, and other private and public organizations and agencies across the United States. Located on 28,000 contiguous acres on the southeast corner of the Rosebud Reservation, the range will be home to the largest Native-managed bison herd in the world once it is fully stocked. Jimmy shares a bit about how the project came to be, what it's like to manage a bison herd with the goal of regenerating degraded prairie land, and how this project will play a role in rekindling the connection between bison and the Lakota peoples.  Transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc   (Intro) Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week we’ll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the food revolution.   Matte (00:00:30) Alright, welcome back to another episode of Food Revolution. This is Matte Wilson, and today our topic is going to be about the Wolakota Buffalo Project, which will soon be the world's largest indigenous managed Buffalo herd in the world today. Our guest is Jimmy Doyle. Jimmy, do you want to introduce yourself?  Jimmy I am the buffalo Range Manager for the Wolakota Project for REDCO here on the Rosebud Reservation.  Matte Awesome. So Jimmy, tell me a little bit about Wolakota; what organizations have been involved in this project and how long has the project been in development?  Jimmy You know that's a good question. As far as how long it's been in development, it all kinda started before I came on board, but I'd say it's been well over a year in the making, you know, as far as getting all of the approval and funding in place. And it's been a partnership in every sense. I'm sure I'll miss some of the people who've been involved in this, but, you know, REDCO of course is spearheading the efforts on the ground out here, but we have a lot of different partners who have helped make it a reality. Some of the big ones would be World Wildlife Fund has been a tremendous resource. The Department of Interior and national park
Nov 20 2020
16 mins
Home Gardens Feed Communities: An Audio Tour with Corrinne Sully
In this episdode of Food Revolution, you'll be listening to an excerpt from a conversation with Corrinne Sully, a member of the Okreek community on the Rosebud Reservation as well as a food sovereignty advocate, seed saver, and the cook for the Okreek elementary school. The conversation was recorded this past August during a tour of Corrinne’s home garden. Before COVID, Corrinne lead garden to cafeteria efforts and planting activities for kids at the Okreek school. In the summer months she can be found giving away produce from her garden on Sunday afternoons in downtown Mission. Corrinne is a lifelong gardener, and, for those of you who listened to our previous episode, sister to Carmelita Sully, Manager of the Sinte Gleska University Greenhouse.  Transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation _______________________________________________ (Intro) Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for the Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the food revolution.   Mairi (00:00:30) Hey everyone. This is Mairi with the Food Sovereignty Initiative. In today's episode, you'll be hearing an excerpt from a conversation with Corrinne Sully, an Okreek community member, food sovereignty advocate, and the cook for the Okreek elementary school. The conversation was recorded this past August during a tour of Corrinne’s home garden. Before COVID, Corrinne led to garden to cafeteria efforts and planting activities for kids at the Okreek school. In the summer months, she can be found giving away produce from her garden on Sunday afternoons in downtown Mission. Corrinne is a lifelong gardener, and, for those of you who listened to our previous episode, sister to Carmelita Sully, Manager of the SGU Greenhouse. The complete conversation will be available Friday afternoon on our website, www.sicangucdc.org, or you can listen on Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, or Pocket Casts.   Mairi How much time do you spend gardening?  Corrinne (00:01:20)  Between my husband and I probably ten to twelve hours a day. Because he does all the watering and some of the weeding, but I do all of the planting and all of the harvesting, and sometimes he'll help and help me carry stuff in. But yesterday I pi
Nov 6 2020
12 mins
Growing our Future: A Conversation with Carmelita Sully, Master Gardener & Greenhouse Manager
In this episode of Food Revolution, SFSI Media Coordinator Mairi Creedon chats with Carmelita Sully, a Master Gardener and Manager of the Sinte Gleska University Community Greenhouse. Originally from the Okreek community, Carm shares a bit about her background, how she came to be involved with the SGU Greenhouse and the changes she's made to the program over the years, and her hopes for the future of food sovereignty on the Rosebud.  Transcription available here.  Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation __________________________________________________________________ Carmelita Sully: “It's going to be a major health improvement on our community. If we could get more people to be eating fresh vegetables and not from the grocery store. I mean, I'm not gonna lie. I go to the grocery store, I’ll buy stuff from the grocery store that I don't have in season or whatever, but the fewer trips that we can make to the grocery store and instead make them to our backyard garden, or to the farmer's market, or to whoever, your neighbor that has tomatoes or whatever is going to be healthier for our people in the long run.”  Intro (00:00:36) Han Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. We're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be a part of the food revolution. Mairi (00:01:05) Hey everyone. This is Mairi with the Food Sovereignty Initiative. Today on the show, you'll be listening to an interview with Carmelita Sally, a Master Gardener, Manager of the Sinte Gleska University Community Greenhouse and Okreek community member. Carm will talk a bit about her background in regards to food sovereignty, how she came to be involved with the SGU greenhouse and other food sovereignty projects on the reservation, and will share her hopes for the future of food. I was wondering if you could just introduce yourself and then tell me a bit about yourself and your background, and where you're from.   Carm (00:01:34) I'm Carmelita Sully. I work here at Sinte Gleska University Greenhouse. I grew up in Okreek on a ranch, I was the youngest of 15 kids. I've been working here at SGU for 10 years now, I started in April of 2010.  Mairi (00:01:53) I was wondering if you could tell me a bit about the history of the SGU greenhouse and how you became involved with it 10 years ago?   <
Oct 23 2020
35 mins
Business & Health with Zaniya Botanicals
In this episode of Food Revolution, SFSI Director Matte Wilson chats with Garrett Waln, owner of Zaniya Botanicals. Zaniya Botanicals was launched after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and over the past seven months, Garrett has refined his craft and expanded his business. This past summer, he sold bath bombs and sugar scrubs at the Sicangu Harvest Market, and also sells via Facebook. Garrett shares with us the origin story of his business, his plans for the future, and provides insight from his experience running a small business on the Rosebud Reservation.  Full transcription & show notes available here.                        ________________________________________ Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation ____________________________________________ (Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution. Matte (00:00:29) Hi, this is Matte with the Food Sovereignty Initiative. I'm here with Garrett Waln, owner of Zaniya Botanicals. Yeah, we'll get, let's get into it. All right, Garrett, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your background? Where are you from?   Garrett (00:00:41) I'm from Arizona, and my background be best described as Jack-of-all trades, master of none. I've done nearly everything. Basically, anytime anybody needed help, they'd know call Garrett. I’ve even got an IT background.   Matte (00:00:56) How and why did you start your business? How long have you been in business and how has your business changed over time?   Garrett (00:01:03) I started basically as soon as COVID happened. My mom started doing bath bombs and she just was doing it to have fun with it. And I'm like, Oh, I think that looks interesting. And we were stuck at home for two weeks, so I'm like teach me. And then it just basically started snowballing. After so long, we had the bath bombs basically down pat. So I decided to start doing sugar scrubs. After a few months of research, I was able to figure those out. I think I went through about eight batches of sugar scrubs, which is a lot of sugar wasted, but I eventually got that one figured out and now those are taking off and now I'm trying a new soap blend offer.
Oct 9 2020
12 mins
Growing Gardeners, Building Sovereignty
Anpetu waste! In this episode of Food Revolution, you'll hear from three of the Food Sovereignty Initiative's returning summer garden interns: Maddie Kornely, Keshena One Star, and Mikey Boyd. They'll share what food sovereignty means to them, talk about some of the experiences they've had up at the garden, and discuss why they chose to come back this summer. The future of food sovereignty lies with our youth, and seeing the excitement and passion this group of interns brought to the garden this summer has us hopeful for the years to come. Be sure to tune in to future episodes to hear from the rest of the summer garden team!  Show notes & transcription available here. __________________________________________ Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation _________________________________________________ Maddie (00:00:00) Food sovereignty, to me, is... freedom. I feel like everybody should be able to grow their own food and have that information, have that knowledge to be able to do it. And once we hit that step where either you can buy all of it locally or you're growing your own food, I feel like that's the ultimate goal for everyone. It’s important as a people to be able to do that.   (Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution. Mairi: Anpetu waste. I'm Mairi Creeden, the media coordinator for the Food Sovereignty Initiative and the producer of Food Revolution. Today on the show, you'll be hearing from three of our summer garden interns and community members, Maddie Kornely, Keshena One Star, and Mikey Boyd. They'll share what food sovereignty means to them, talk about some of the experiences they've had up at the garden, and discuss why they chose to come back this summer. The future of food sovereignty lies with our youth, and seeing the excitement and passion this group of interns brought to the garden this summer has left us hopeful for the years to come. Be sure to tune in to future episodes to hear from the rest of the summer garden team.   Maddie (00:01:41) My name is Maddie Kornely, I'm from the Mission/Antelope area. My parents are from here, they work in the school district and I live in teacher housing. Well, I did originally apply last year, but, something didn't work out. So I was really happy that they asked again this year if I wanted to do it, and I was able to get my application in and do it again because I love working out here. I just really like p
Sep 25 2020
8 mins
2050 Vision: Revitalizing a Local Lakota Food System
Anpetu waste! In this episode of Food Revolution, SFSI Garden Assistant & WIK intern Karen Moore chats with SFSI Director Matte Wilson about the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative's vision for Rosebud's food system in the year 2050. The SFSI is one of ten finalists recently awarded the Food System Vision Prize from the Rockefeller Foundation. Along with our partners REDCO & Tatanka Funds, the SFSI team spent spring 2020 meeting with Rosebud community members & leaders to develop a vision that is just, equitable, regenerative, and grounded in Lakota culture & values.  Full show notes & transcription available here. _______________________________________________ Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation  ____________________________________________ (Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution. Matte (00:00:32): “The alarm goes off. I open my eyes and start my day as usual. French press coffee made and I'm out the door. Today is the 30th annual Lakota Food Summit. I remember when I attended the 1st summit.Driving to the venue, I see the liveliness of Rosebud on a Saturday morning. People are out buying produce at the farmers market. I see the hot food vendors, and my mind immediately goes to the breakfast burrito stand where the woman makes homemade tortillas and gets her eggs from the vendor a few booths down. I can't stop today, I have something important to do. Pulling up to the venue, I feel honored that I was asked to prepare a dish and be a featured chef. Getting situated in the kitchen, feels so 2nd nature. I put on my custom apron, which has ribbon sewn into it. I feel like I just put on my battle armor, and in a sense, I did. My recipe for the day calls for bison. I open the walk-in cooler and pull out my slab of bison meat, feeling proud that I know this buffalo was raised and processed on Rosebud.  The dish is done and plated. As people in the conference room take their first bite, I know that the food they are eating is medicine. The bison was raised and harvested in a way that respected its sacrifice. And putting my good thoughts and energy into preparing it, the food now becomes medicine, nourish
Sep 4 2020
11 mins
Finding Direction with Arrow Wild Harvesters
Anpetu waste! In today's episode of Food Revolution, we chat with Jordan Arrow of Arrow Wild Harvesters. Arrow Wild Harvesters was a vendor at the 2019 Sicangu Harvest Market (formerly known as the Keya Wakpala Farmers' Market) and is a local, tribally owned family business operating on the Rosebud Reservation. Jordan recently returned to Rosebud after living off-reservation for a time. He now works with his father and sister, with each bringing their own skills and products to the table. Arrow Wild Harvesters provides edible & medicinal wild plants and herbs, as well as fresh bread and homemade jams and jellies to community members. In this episode, Jordan shares with us what it's like to work with his family, what goes on behind the scenes in his family business, how they got started, and more!  Full show notes & transcription available here.                       _________________________________________ Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation               __________________________________________________ (Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution. Michelle (00:00:27): Anpetu waste Oyate, and thanks for tuning into this episode of Food Fevolutionl brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. I'm Michelle, the FSI Market Manager and your host for today's episode. Our next episode will air two weeks from today. Today we're chatting with Jordan arrow, owner of Arrow Wild Harvesters, and a vendor at the Lakota Harvest Market, formerly known as the Keya Wakpala Farmers' Market located in Mission. Hi Jordan, thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about yourself and your background?   Jordan (00:00:59):  I'm spent most of my life here, left to Wyoming and just came back recently the past, close to two years, to do this type of a business.  Michelle (00:01:18): What does it mean to you to be able to provide food for your community?   Jordan (00:01:23): There's a lot of, uh, different things that people kind of want as far as indigenous plants or, you know, local people… know what grows around where, I know roughly where it's at, but it's kind of a [challenge] to try and get through these wild plants, uh, that are just growing way out and like the middle of nowhere essent
Aug 14 2020
13 mins
Growing Food Producers on the Rosebud
In this episode of Food Revolution, we hear from Karen Moore, one of the SFSI's WIK interns. The WIK internship, short for Waicahya Icagapi Kte or ‘They Will Grow into Producers,' is a year-long paid adult internship for tribal members interested in becoming food producers. Our first intern cohort has been working and learning with the SFSI since November 2019. The internship was designed in collaboration with Dakota Rural Action to provide both on-farm and classroom training for community members who want to be a part of building a local foods economy right here on the Rosebud Reservation. The two types of training allows them to learn the technical skills needed to grow and produce food and also ensures they have the business background necessary to make their future operations financially sustainable and profitable.  Full show notes & transcription available here.                         ________________________________ Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible.  Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation                                  ________________________________  (Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to the Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be a part of the Food Revolution.   Michelle: Anpetu waste, and thanks for tuning in to this episode of Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. I'm Michelle, the FSI Market Manager and your host for today's episode. Our next episode will air two weeks from today. Today we're talking to our WIK intern, Karen Moore. Our WIK internship also known as Waicahya Icagapi Kte, or They Will Grow Into Producers, is a year-long paid internship for tribal members interested in becoming food producers. It began in November 2019 and was designed to provide teaching and learning opportunities for community members who want to help build a local food economy to feed our Oyate. Interns receive both on-farm as well as classroom training over the course of the year. The two types of training allows them to learn the technical skills needed to grow and produce food, and also ensures they have the business background necessary to make their future operations financially sustainable.
Jul 31 2020
9 mins
Welcome to the Sicangu Food Revolution
In our inaugural episode, SFSI Market & Garden Manager Michelle Haukaas shares the backstory behind the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative and provides an overview of our current programming to build food sovereignty on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, home of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate in south-central South Dakota.            Full show notes + transcription available here.                                                                                     _____________________ Food is more than just food. It's part of our 7 generational plan to create sustainable systems for the next 7 generations. Your giving helps us to expand our Food Sovereignty Initiative and amplify our impact. With your donations, we're able to strengthen Lakota food ways, and as a result, our people.        Website: www.sicangucdc.org Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation Instagram: @sicangucdc Twitter: @sicangucdc YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation                                                                                                                                                               _____________________ Food Revolution Ep. 1  Anpetu waste, Oyate, and thanks for tuning in to our first episode of Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative! I’m Michelle, the FSI Market Manager. Some of you may be familiar with our 2019 radio show ‘Growing in the Garden.’ This year, we’ll still be bringing you information on growing and harvesting cultivated & wild foods, but we’ll also be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and food producers who are working to transform the food system here on the Rosebud.  For those of you who may not have heard of our program before, welcome! The Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative was founded in 2014 and until last fall, was housed under REDCO, the Rosebud Economic Development Corporation. It came about after a series of community meetings and discussions that demonstrated a desire and need for a community garden, farmers’ markets, and other programs to strengthen Rosebud’s food sys
Jul 17 2020
6 mins