Physician's Weekly Podcast

Physician's Weekly

Physician's Weekly offers in-depth interviews with the most highly respected experts in the medical community, weighing in on landmark research, trending topics, and offering insight on issues affecting everyday medical practice. In collaboration with Medicom Medical Publishers, Physician's Weekly Podcast continues to maintain the company's nearly 40 year reputation as a trusted resource for healthcare professionals. read less

inDEPTH: Excess Nitrogen in the Body
Nov 30 2022
inDEPTH: Excess Nitrogen in the Body
With most Americans recently celebrating Thanksgiving by joining friends and family over a large, turkey-heavy celebratory meal, we take an inDEPTH look at how our bodies deal with excess nitrogen. Animals mostly excrete excess nitrogen as ammonia, urea, or uric acid, which is produced during protein metabolism. Ammonia is the direct waste produced as a byproduct of protein metabolism by all animals. But because of its toxicity, many animals convert ammonia into a less toxic form. The major excretory product in humans is urea, which is excreted in urine by the kidneys. Fun fact: birds and reptiles have evolved the ability to convert toxic ammonia into uric acid, which packs four nitrogens into each molecule, compared with two nitrogens in each human urea molecule. Not only is that a much more efficient means of excreting nitrogen, uric acid is a white crystal precipitate, which is why guano is white and makes such an excellent fertilizer.Humans have many diseases caused by excess nitrogen. Later in this episode, we will talk with Dr. Julien Baruteau, from the Metabolic Medicine Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, in London, UK, about how his lab goes about modeling urea cycle disorders using patient cells. But first, we speak with Dr. Michael Pillinger (NYU Grossman School of Medicine, NY), about how gout flares result from an innate immune response against monosodium urate crystal deposits, and about his recent results from the PIVOTAL study, presented at the ACR Convergence 2022 meeting.
inDEPTH: The LDL-C Revolution
Nov 16 2022
inDEPTH: The LDL-C Revolution
We are entering holiday season, and as a recent study published in the journal Atherosclerosis recently showed, celebrating the winter holidays is associated with up to 20% higher levels of total and LDL cholesterol, as well as up to a 15% higher risk for hypercholesterolemia in the general population. Although the holiday season is not a great time for a diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia, it is a great time to start talking about some of the revolutionary new methods to treat hyperlipidemia. To take up that challenge, we take an in-depth look at two new studies just reported at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2022, held in Chicago, Nov 5-7. Statins are first-line agents for reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and the risk of major cardiovascular events. In addition, biotechnological advancements in medication therapy have led to the development of inclisiran, a recently approved twice-yearly injectable agent to help patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and clinical cardiovascular disease on a maximally tolerated statin to reach LDL-C targets. Inclisiran has demonstrated robust LDL-C reduction in clinical trials in combination with a favorable safety profile; however, the effect on cardiovascular clinical outcomes still remains under evaluation. First, Professor Kausik “Kosh” Ray (Imperial College London, UK, and President European Atherosclerosis Society) talks about the ORION-3 trial. Then, Professor Jeff Anderson (Intermountain Heart Institute, Utah) discusses the VICTORION-INCEPTION Trial.Enjoy listening!Additional readingVedel-Krogh S, Kobylecki CJ, Nordestgaard BG, Langsted A. The Christmas holidays are immediately followed by a period of hypercholesterolemia. Atherosclerosis. 2019 Feb;281:121-127.Ray K, et al. Efficacy and Safety of Twice-Yearly Subcutaneous Inclisiran in Patients With High Cardiovascular Risk and Elevated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol up to 4 Years-The ORION-3 Trial. Presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, Nov 5-7th, 2022. Anderson J, et al. A Randomized Study to Compare LDL-C-Lowering Effects of Inclisiran With Usual Care vs Usual Care Alone in Patients With Recent Hospitalization for an Acute Coronary Syndrome: Rationale and Design of the VICTORION-INCEPTION Trial. Presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, Nov 5-7th, 2022, Abstract 10851.
Heart Defects & Fish, Should Docs Apologize?
Oct 19 2022
Heart Defects & Fish, Should Docs Apologize?
This episode, we have two really interesting and very different interviews. Physician’s Weekly speaks with our regular contributor, a registered physician and medical malpractice attorney, who goes by the alias Dr. MedLaw. We explore when and how it is appropriate for physicians to apologize… or not. But first, Princeton University Professor Rebecca Burdine, PhD, speaks about the value of modelling rare diseases. Dr. Burdine uses small zebrafish for her studies, and you would be amazed at how well these small fish can model diseases, and even be used in diagnostics. Dr. Burdine is also a caregiver to her daughter, who has the rare disease Angelman Syndrome, which Dr. Burdine just happens to study. She provides excellent insights into the value of studying rare diseases. Enjoy listening!Additional reading Willgoss T, Cassater D, Connor S, Krishnan ML, Miller MT, Dias-Barbosa C, Phillips D, McCormack J, Bird LM, Burdine RD, Claridge S, Bichell TJ. Measuring What Matters to Individuals with Angelman Syndrome and Their Families: Development of a Patient-Centered Disease Concept Model. Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2021 Aug;52(4):654-668. Cheng KC, Burdine RD, Dickinson ME, Ekker SC, Lin AY, Lloyd KCK, Lutz CM, MacRae CA, Morrison JH, O'Connor DH, Postlethwait JH, Rogers CD, Sanchez S, Simpson JH, Talbot WS, Wallace DC, Weimer JM, Bellen HJ. Promoting validation and cross-phylogenetic integration in model organism research. Dis Model Mech. 2022 Sep 1;15(9):dmm049600.Bird LM, Ochoa-Lubinoff C, Tan WH, Heimer G, Melmed RD, Rakhit A, Visootsak J, During MJ, Holcroft C, Burdine RD, Kolevzon A, Thibert RL. The STARS Phase 2 Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Gaboxadol in Angelman Syndrome. Neurology. 2021 Feb 16;96(7):e1024-e1035. Patterson VL, Burdine RD. Swimming toward solutions: Using fish and frogs as models for understanding RASopathies. Birth Defects Res. 2020 Jun;112(10):749-765.
Abortion Care, Access & Managing ADPKD-Associated Pain
Sep 28 2022
Abortion Care, Access & Managing ADPKD-Associated Pain
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly podcast. I am your host, Dr. Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. In this episode, we have two fascinating interviews. Physician’s Weekly’s Editorial Board Member Alex McDonald, MD, interviews Kavita Arora, MD, Division Director of General Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine  ( about how to flip the narrative that providing abortion service *is* healthcare. In this interview Dr. Arora is “Not sure that I would agree that the measures are well-intended; I think they are misogynistic and controlling of women. They invade patient-clinician privacy and the sacred relationship that happens in my exam room.”But first,  Physician’s Weekly’s senior editor Martta Kelly speaks with Dr. Osama Amro, Director of Swedish Polycystic Kidney Disease Center in Seattle, WA, about their multidisciplinary patient-centered approach to pain management strategies in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). ADPKD is one of the most common genetic diseases in humans, affecting 1 in 400 individuals, and is the fourth most common cause of renal failure worldwide.  If one parent has ADPKD, the children have a 50% chance of inheriting the gene (though up to 10% of patients don’t have a family history and have de novo mutations). Pain management is central to progressive ADPKD, as the cysts grow, the weight of the kidneys can affect other systems. Dr. Amro provides practical tips on both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches.Enjoy listening!
Biomarkers for NSCLC: What You Need to Know – Part 2
Sep 28 2022
Biomarkers for NSCLC: What You Need to Know – Part 2
The evolution of biomarkers informing therapy decisions began in 2004, when the FDA approved a medicine to treat EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Since then, researchers have identified more than 20 distinct mutations in driver genes that are specific to lung cancer, nine of which are treatable through FDA-approved therapy drugs: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1, BRAF V600E, NTRK, MET, RET, and histological expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1).Confirming a patient's biomarker status can open the door to precision medicine. The molecular characterization of lung cancer has considerably changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has also led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. Additional research is needed to identify and help treat the approximately one-third of lung cancer patients for whom biomarkers have yet to be identified.This podcast focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy, as well as potential new targets for drug development. We spoke in our first episode with Dr. David M. Waterhouse, who just moved to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard Medical School, and until last month was the former Director of Clinical Research at Oncology-Hematology Care, in Cincinnati. We also talk about how these biomarkers are used in academic versus community hospitals. In this second episode, we talk with Dr. Sinchita Roy Chowdhuri, a molecular pathologist from University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, about what you didn’t know about actionable biomarkers for NSCLC.
What You Need to Know About Monkeypox & the “Loss of Chance” Malpractice Doctrine
Aug 31 2022
What You Need to Know About Monkeypox & the “Loss of Chance” Malpractice Doctrine
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly podcast. I am your host, Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. Today’s episode features two interviews. First, we talk about a very timely topic—monkeypox—with public health specialist Dr. Louise Sigfrid from Oxford University. An ongoing outbreak of monkeypox, a viral disease, was confirmed in May 2022. The initial cluster of cases was found in the United Kingdom, where the first case was detected on May 6, 2022 in an individual with travel links to Nigeria. The President Biden administration this month declared the outbreak of monkeypox a public health emergency. Who is at risk? What are the clinical guideline recommendations? Dr. Sigfrid has been involved in the public health response since the beginning of the current outbreak and recently published a paper examining the clinical guidelines for prevention and treatment of monkeypox. Our second interview is with regular contributor and registered radiologist and medical malpractice attorney, Dr. MedLaw. She tells us all about what “loss of chance” means in a medical malpractice claim. Under the loss of chance doctrine, a doctor can be held liable for causing the patient's loss of a chance to be cured if the doctor negligently fails to diagnose a curable disease and the patient is harmed by the disease. Enjoy listening! Additional reading Webb E, et al. Availability, scope and quality of monkeypox clinical management guidelines globally: a systematic review. BMJ Glob Health. 2022 Aug;7(8):e009838. doi: 10.1136/bmjgh-2022-009838. PMID: 35973747.
Biomarkers for NSCLC: What You Need to Know - Part 1
Aug 17 2022
Biomarkers for NSCLC: What You Need to Know - Part 1
The evolution of biomarkers informing therapy decisions began in 2004, when the FDA approved a medicine to treat EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Since then, researchers have identified more than 20 distinct mutations in driver genes that are specific to lung cancer, nine of which are treatable through FDA-approved therapy drugs: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1, BRAF V600E, NTRK, MET, RET, and histological expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1).Confirming a patient's biomarker status can open the door to precision medicine. The molecular characterization of lung cancer has considerably changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has also led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. Additional research is needed to identify and help treat the approximately one-third of lung cancer patients for whom biomarkers have yet to be identified.This podcast focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy, as well as potential new targets for drug development. We speak in our first episode with Dr. David M. Waterhouse, who just moved to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard Medical School, and until last month was the former Director of Clinical Research at Oncology-Hematology Care, in Cincinnati. We also talk about how these biomarkers are used in academic versus community hospitals. In our second episode, we will talk with Dr. Sinchita Roy Chowdhuri, a molecular pathologist from University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, about what you didn’t know about actionable biomarkers for NSCLC.
An inDEPTH Look at Twins: Separating Craniopagus Conjoined Twins and How Twin Research Can Prevent Smoking
Aug 17 2022
An inDEPTH Look at Twins: Separating Craniopagus Conjoined Twins and How Twin Research Can Prevent Smoking
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly podcast. I am your host, Dr Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. Today’s episode features two interviews, with an inDEPTH look at twins. In 1984, Hrubec and Robinette published what was arguably the first review of the role of twins in medical research. The authors acknowledged a growing distinction between two categories of twin studies: those aimed at assessing genetic contributions to disease and those aimed at assessing environmental contributions while controlling for genetic variation. “Classical twin models” compare phenotypic similarity within monozygotic or identical twin pairs to that within dizygotic or fraternal pairs to establish the proportion of variance in a given trait due to genetic variation within a population and the proportion due to environmental variation. ‘Twin differences’ or ‘discordant twin models', which focus on comparisons within monozygotic pairs control for maternal factors during pregnancy, gestational age, location and season of birth, postnatal familial factors, age, ethnicity, gender, and genetics, they are very useful in teasing out environmental factors. Later in this episode, we interview Dr. Karri Silventoinen (Dept Public Health, University Helsinki, Finland), an expert in twin studies, about his recent publication in Science Reports that identifies the significant effect of education on smoking prevention and cessation through discordant twin study involving more than 100,000 twin pairs. But first I catch up with a doctor who was recently in world news for successfully separating craniopagus conjoined twins with fused brains, pediatric neurosurgeon Professor Owase Jeelani, from the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, the UK. Dr. Jeelani tells us how the surgery was “a really close call”, and how the team overcame an unexpected obstacle. In 2019, Dr. Jeelani co-founded Gemini Untwined, a global charity dedicated to supporting the research and treatment of craniopagus twins.Enjoy listening! Additional readingHrubec Z, Robinette CD. The study of human twins in medical research. N Engl J Med. 1984 Feb 16;310(7):435-41.McCallum S, BBC News 1 August 2022, Conjoined twins separated with the help of virtual reality. K, et al. Smoking remains associated with education after controlling for social background and genetic factors in a study of 18 twin cohorts. Sci Rep. 2022 Jul 31;12(1):13148.
An inDEPTH Look at Prevention: CVD in Women & Colorectal Cancer
Aug 10 2022
An inDEPTH Look at Prevention: CVD in Women & Colorectal Cancer
Welcome to this episode of Physician’s Weekly podcast. I am your host, Dr. Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician’s Weekly. The phrase "prevention is better than a cure" is often attributed to the Dutch philosopher Erasmus around 1500 AD.  But in the US, most people are more familiar with Benjamin Franklin telling Philadelphians in 1736 that  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” One hundred years later, Thomas A. Edison said “The doctor of the future will give no medication but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, diet and in the cause and prevention of disease". For the last 50 years, preventative medicine has been gaining tremendous ground, and we are steadily learning more using clinical research.Today’s episode features two interviews with an inDEPTH look at prevention. Professor John Mathers from Newcastle University, UK, discusses just-published data from the groundbreaking CAPP2 study that puts an interesting twist on how aspirin could prevent colorectal cancer. Also, Dr. Nanette Wenger, clinical cardiologist and professor emerita at Emory University School of Medicine has “buckets of research” to share on cardiovascular disease prevention in women, beyond the more than 1,300 scientific papers she’s had published.   Enjoy listening!Additional readingBurn J, et al. Cancer prevention with aspirin in hereditary colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome), 10-year follow-up and registry-based 20-year data in the CAPP2 study: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2020 Jun 13;395(10240):1855-1863. Mathers JC, et al. Cancer Prevention with Resistant Starch in Lynch Syndrome Patients in the CAPP2-Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial: Planned 10-Year Follow-up. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2022 Jul 25:OF1-OF12.Wenger NK, et al. Call to Action for Cardiovascular Disease in Women: Epidemiology, Awareness, Access, and Delivery of Equitable Health Care: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2022 Jun 7;145(23):e1059-e1071Oliveira GMM, Wenger NK. Special Considerations in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women. Arq Bras Cardiol. 2022 Feb;118(2):374-377.