PODCAST

BJKS Podcast

Benjamin James Kuper-Smith

A podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related. Long-form interviews with people whose work I find interesting, and book discussions. New episodes every Friday.
46. Book club: Conceptual Spaces by Peter Gärdenfors, chapters 1 & 2
This is the first episode of a book club series on Peter Gärdenfors's book Conceptual Spaces. In this episode, we will discuss chapters 1 and 2, which provide an overview over the book, and a discussion of the three kinds of representation: subconceptual, conceptual, and symbolic.For this series, I'm joined by Koen Frolichcs, who was already my cohost for the books club series on Lee Child's Killing Floor. Koen and I are PhD students in the same lab.Podcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtKoen's linksGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/frolichs-scholarTwitter: https://geni.us/frolichs-twtBen's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtMy interview with Jacob Bellmund: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/1390924/9275803-37-jacob-bellmund-deformed-cognitive-maps-abstract-cognitive-spaces-and-how-many-dimensions-can-grid-cells-encodeBringing up Marr on a first date: https://twitter.com/wavyphd/status/1456038544250638341/photo/1ReferencesBanino, A., Barry, C., Uria, B., Blundell, C., Lillicrap, T., Mirowski, P., ... & Kumaran, D. (2018). Vector-based navigation using grid-like representations in artificial agents. Nature, 557(7705), 429-433.Bellmund, J. L., Gärdenfors, P., Moser, E. I., & Doeller, C. F. (2018). Navigating cognition: Spatial codes for human thinking. Science, 362(6415).Gärdenfors, P. (2004). Conceptual spaces: The geometry of thought. MIT press.Hafting, T., Fyhn, M., Molden, S., Moser, M. B., & Moser, E. I. (2005). Microstructure of a spatial map in the entorhinal cortex. Nature, 436(7052), 801-806.Kriegeskorte, N., Mur, M., & Bandettini, P. A. (2008). Representational similarity analysis-connecting the branches of systems neuroscience. Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 2, 4. Kuper-Smith, B. J., & Korn, C. (2021, October 28). Decomposed 2*2 games - a conceptual review. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/5jxrf O'Keefe, J., & Dostrovsky, J. (1971). The hippocampus as a spatial map: preliminary evidence from unit activity in the freely-moving rat. Brain research.Poldrack, R. A. (2020). The physics of representation. Synthese, 1-19.
6d ago
40 mins
45. Michael Hornberger: Sea Hero Quest, developing games for science, and Alzheimer's disease
Michael Hornberger is a professor of applied dementia research who developed Sea Hero Quest, a mobile game for studying spatial navigation that was downloaded more than 4 million times. In this conversation, we talk about Sea Hero Quest, how Michael (together with Hugo Spiers) developed it, the first findings, and dementia in general.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps00:04: How Michael started doing research on dementia02:32: What is Sea Hero Quest?05:18: How Sea Hero Quest got started and developed31:45: Start discussing some results from Sea Hero Quest38:16: How does Sea Hero Quest relate to Michael's work on dementia?43:16: How far are we from using (something like) Sea Hero Quest as an early biomarker for Alzheimer's?45:36: What is dementia and how can we prevent it? Discussing Michael's new book about Alzheimer's 'Tangled Up'Podcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtMichael's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/hornberger-webGoogle Scholar:  https://geni.us/hornberger-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/hornberger-twtBook: https://geni.us/hornberger-bookBen's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtReferencesAlzheimer (1906). Uber einen eigenartigen, schweren Erkrankungsprozess der Hirnrinde. Neurol. Cbl..Alzheimer, Förstl, & Levy (1991). On certain peculiar diseases of old age. History of psychiatry.Anguera, Boccanfuso, Rintoul, Al-Hashimi, Faraji, Janowich, ... & Gazzaley (2013). Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults. Nature.See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NeuroRacerCoughlan, Coutrot, Khondoker, Minihane, Spiers & Hornberger (2019). Toward personalized cognitive diagnostics of at-genetic-risk Alzheimer’s disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Coughlan, Laczó, Hort, Minihane, & Hornberger (2018). Spatial navigation deficits—overlooked cognitive marker for preclinical Alzheimer disease?. Nature Reviews Neurology.Coughlan, Puthusseryppady, Lowry, Gillings, Spiers, Minihane, & Hornberger (2020). Test-retest reliability of spatial navigation in adults at-risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Plos one.Coutrot, Schmidt, Coutrot, Pittman, Hong, Wiener, ... Hornberger, & Spiers (2019). Virtual navigation tested on a mobile app is predictive of real-world wayfinding navigation performance. PloS one.Coutrot, Silva, Manley, de Cothi, Sami, Bohbot, ... Hornberger, & Spiers (2018). Global determinants of navigation ability. Current Biology. Fold.it game: https://fold.it/Hornberger (2021). Tangled up. The science and history of Alzheimer's disease.Kunz, Schröder, Lee, Montag, Lachmann, Sariyska, ... & Axmacher (2015). Reduced grid-cell–like representations in adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Science.
Nov 26 2021
1 hr 3 mins
44. Dan Quintana: Synthetic datasets, science communication, and podcasting
Dan Quintana is a senior researcher at the University of Olso, where his research focuses on oxytocin, autism,  and meta-analyses. In this conversation, we talk about Dan's primer on synthetic datasets, science comunication, Everything Hertz, and podcasting in general.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday, available on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:04: From Australia to Norway0:09:37: Synthetic datasets0:41:15: Software tools in science (for writing and analysing data)0:58:41: Dan's multifaceted online presence / science communication on social media1:06:32: How to grow on Twitter with no followers1:15:45: The sound of your own voice1:22:30: Some of Dan's favourite podcasts1:25:53: How Everything Hertz grew over time1:33:04: Finances of podcasts1:41:45: Podcast editingPodcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtDan's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/quintana-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/quintana-scholarTwitter: https://geni.us/quintana-twtBen's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtReferencesBrown, N. J., & Heathers, J. A. (2017). The GRIM test: A simple technique detects numerous anomalies in the reporting of results in psychology. Social Psychological and Personality Science.Heathers, J. A., Anaya, J., van der Zee, T., & Brown, N. J. (2018). Recovering data from summary statistics: Sample parameter reconstruction via iterative techniques (SPRITE). PeerJ Preprints.Kuper-Smith, B. J., & Korn, C. (2021, Oct). Decomposed 2*2 games - a conceptual review. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/5jxrfQuintana, D. S. (2020). A synthetic dataset primer for the biobehavioural sciences to promote reproducibility and hypothesis generation. Elife, 9.LinksThe psychpathy measure used in my study with prison inmates: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychopathy_ChecklistMost standard statistical tests are linear models blog post: https://lindeloev.github.io/tests-as-linear/Dan's presentation on synthetic datasets for RIOT Science Club: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fAR_oro1NYSimul for writing collaborations: https://www.simuldocs.com/Melon for live streaming: https://melonapp.com/featuresSome podcasts Dan listens to:Quantitude: https://quantitudepod.org/Very bad wizards: https://www.verybadwizards.com/Ologies: https://www.alieward.com/ologiesEzra Klein: https://www.nytimes.com/column/ezra-klein-podcastHarcore History: https://www.dancarlin.com/hardcore-history-series/
Nov 19 2021
1 hr 45 mins
43. Postdoc applications (with Matthias Stangl)42. Matthias Stangl: grid cells in aging, path integration, and neural representations of actual physical movement in humans
Matthias Stangl is a postdoc at UCLA, where he studies the neural representations of spatial navigation in social situations. In this conversation, we talk about his PhD work about aging, grid cells, and path integration, about his recent Nature paper, about the difference between movement in VR and actual physical movement, and much more.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New episodes every Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:04: Stangl.Stangl.eu0:02:13: Start discussing Matthias's Current Biology paper on aging, grid cells, and spatial navigation0:07:10: The temporal stability of grid cells0:16:10: Start discussing Matthias's Nature Communications paper on path integration errors in aging0:26:07: Sensory effects on path integration in humans and other animals0:37:45: Does actual movement lead to stronger grid cells firing (compared to imagined/VR)?0:41:52: Start discussing Matthias's Nature paper on neural representations for self and other in real spatial navigation1:00:03: Matthias's futurePodcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtMatthias's linksGoogle Scholar:  https://geni.us/stangl-scholarTwitter: https://geni.us/stangl-twtBen's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtReferencesAghajan, Z. M., Schuette, P., Fields, T. A., Tran, M. E., Siddiqui, S. M., Hasulak, N. R., ... & Suthana, N. (2017). Theta oscillations in the human medial temporal lobe during real-world ambulatory movement. Current Biology.Barnes, C. A., Suster, M. S., Shen, J., & McNaughton, B. L. (1997). Multistability of cognitive maps in the hippocampus of old rats. Nature.Chen, G., Manson, D., Cacucci, F., & Wills, T. J. (2016). Absence of visual input results in the disruption of grid cell firing in the mouse. Current Biology.Kunz, L., Schröder, T. N., Lee, H., Montag, C., Lachmann, B., Sariyska, R., ... & Axmacher, N. (2015). Reduced grid-cell–like representations in adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Science.Stangl, M., Achtzehn, J., Huber, K., Dietrich, C., Tempelmann, C., & Wolbers, T. (2018). Compromised grid-cell-like representations in old age as a key mechanism to explain age-related navigational deficits. Current Biology.Stangl, M., Kanitscheider, I., Riemer, M., Fiete, I., & Wolbers, T. (2020). Sources of path integration error in young and aging humans. Nature communications.Stangl, M., Topalovic, U., Inman, C. S., Hiller, S., Villaroman, D., Aghajan, Z. M., ... & Suthana, N. (2021). Boundary-anchored neural mechanisms of location-encoding for self and others. Nature.Topalovic, U., Aghajan, Z. M., Villaroman, D., Hiller, S., Christov-Moore, L., Wishard, T. J., ... & Suthana, N. (2020). Wireless programmable recording and stimulation of deep brain activity in freely moving humans. Neuron.Yoder, R. M., & Taube, J. S. (2014). The vestibular contribution to the head direction signal and navigation. Frontiers in integrative neuroscience.
Nov 5 2021
1 hr 9 mins
41. Reviewing all books called "Prisoner's Dilemma" Part 2: The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Prisoner's Dilemma (Stewart), and Prisoner's Dilemma (Yardley)40. Reviewing all books called "Prisoner's Dilemma" Part 1: A Prisoner's Dilemma (Karabache) and Prisoner's Dilemma (Feiklowicz)
This episode is the start of an experiment: I'll be reviewing all books called "Prisoner's Dilemma", and today I'm starting with the first two books. Basically, I use the Prisoner's Dilemma in my own work and realised that there are 26 books with that title (or minor variant thereof). So, as a very silly idea, I decided to review them all and see whether there is anything I can learn from them about the Prisoner's Dilemma. This episode will be the first, and I'm reviewing A Prisoner's Dilemma by Matthew Karabache and Prisoner's Dilemma by Damien Mitchell Feiklowicz. Over the course of the next two years or so, I'll occasionally review the other books.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps00:00: Why will I be reviewing all books called "Prisoner's Dilemma"??05:20: Matthew Karabache: A Prisoner's Dilemma12:47: Damien Mitchell Feiklowicz: Prisoner's Dilemma, or In a Nutshell28:32: End summaryPodcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtBen's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtReferences Amazon link for A Prisoner's Dilemma by Matthew Karabache: https://geni.us/bjks-PD-KarabacheAmazon link for Prisoner's Dilemma by Damien Mitchel Feiklowicz: https://geni.us/bjks-PD-FeiklowiczMy episode about Huxley's Brave New World: https://geni.us/bjks-huxley-bnw
Oct 22 2021
30 mins
39. Nikolai Axmacher: Reduced grid cells in Alzheimer's risk carriers, landmarks in abstract cognitive space, and clinical translation
Nikolai Axmacher is professor at the Institue for Cognitive Neuroscience at the Ruhr University Bochum where his research focuses on memory, spatial navigation, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this conversation, we talk about how he and his colleagues found that people with a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's showed reduced grid-cell like activity and path integration ability, despite having no symptoms and still being in their 20s.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:05: The history of Nikolai's 2015 Science paper "Reduced grid-cell-like representations in adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease"0:15:57: Discussing the paper's main findings0:38:35: Discussing Bierbauer...Axmacher (2020), Science Advances0:49:03: Applying (abstract) cognitive spaces to Nikolai's studies0:59:10: Could we use grid cells as an early biomarker for Alzheimer's?Podcast linksWebsite: https://geni.us/bjks-podTwitter: https://geni.us/bjks-pod-twtNikolai's linksWebsite: https://geni.us/axmacher-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/axmacher-scholarBen's linksWebsite:  https://geni.us/bjks-webGoogle Scholar: https://geni.us/bjks-scholarTwitter:  https://geni.us/bjks-twtReferencesBierbrauer, Kunz, Gomes, Luhmann, Deuker, Getzmann, ... & Axmacher (2020). Unmasking selective path integration deficits in Alzheimer’s disease risk carriers. Science advances.Constantinescu, O’Reilly, & Behrens (2016). Organizing conceptual knowledge in humans with a gridlike code. Science.Coutrot, Silva, Manley, de Cothi, Sami, Bohbot, ... & Spiers (2018). Global determinants of navigation ability. Current Biology.Doeller, Barry, & Burgess (2010). Evidence for grid cells in a human memory network. Nature.Ghebremedhin, Schultz, Braak, & Braak (1998). High frequency of apolipoprotein E ϵ4 allele in young individuals with very mild Alzheimer's disease-related neurofibrillary changes. Experimental neurology.Hafting, Fyhn, Molden, Moser, & Moser (2005). Microstructure of a spatial map in the entorhinal cortex. Nature.Hardcastle, Ganguli, & Giocomo (2015). Environmental boundaries as an error correction mechanism for grid cells. Neuron. Huxley (1959). Brave New World Revisited.  Chatto & Windus. Kunz, Schröder, Lee, Montag, Lachmann, Sariyska, ... & Axmacher (2015). Reduced grid-cell–like representations in adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Science.Quiroga, Reddy, Kreiman, Koch, & Fried. (2005). Invariant visual representation by single neurons in the human brain. Nature.Saint-Aubert, Lemoine, Chiotis, Leuzy, Rodriguez-Vieitez, & Nordberg. (2017). Tau PET imaging: present and future directions. Molecular neurodegeneration.Wills, Cacucci, Burgess, & O'Keefe (2010). Development of the hippocampal cognitive map in preweanling rats. Science.Wills, Muessig, & Cacucci (2014). The development of spatial behaviour and the hippocampal neural representation of space. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.
Oct 15 2021
1 hr 9 mins
38. Keno Juechems: Where does value (in RL) come from, optimality with finite computational resources, and learning as a PhD student
Keno Juechems is a Junior Research Fellow at St John's College in Oxford. He studies how humans make decisions, using computational modelling, behavioural tasks, and fMRI. In this conversation, we talk about his papers  "Optimal utility and probability functions for agents with finite computational precision" and  "Where does value come from?", and various related topics.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New episodes every Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:05: Where does the name "Keno" come from?0:01:47: How Keno got into his current research area0:14:09: Start discussing Keno's paper "Optimal utility and probability functions for agents with finite computational precision"0:26:46: Rationality and optimality0:38:58: Losses, gains, and how much does a paper need to include?0:51:04: Start discussing Keno's paper "Where does value come from?"1:10:28: How does a PhD student learn all this stuff?1:19:56: Resources for learning behavioural economics and reinforcement learning1:25:42: What's next for Keno Juechems?Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastKeno's linksWebsite: https://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/discover/people/keno-juchems/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=tereY1oAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/kjuechemsBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJTwitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweetsReferencesJuechems, K., & Summerfield, C. (2019). Where does value come from?. Trends in cognitive sciences.Juechems, K., Balaguer, J., Spitzer, B., & Summerfield, C. (2021). Optimal utility and probability functions for agents with finite computational precision. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Kahneman, D., & Tversky, A. (1979). Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica.Keramati, M., & Gutkin, B. (2014). Homeostatic reinforcement learning for integrating reward collection and physiological stability. Elife.Lewis, M. (2016). The undoing project: A friendship that changed the world. Penguin UK.Sutton, R. S., & Barto, A. G. (2018). Reinforcement learning: An introduction. MIT press.Thaler, R. H. (2015). Misbehaving: The making of behavioral economics.Trepte, S., Reinecke, L., & Juechems, K. (2012). The social side of gaming: How playing online computer games creates online and offline social support. Computers in Human behavior.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indifference_curveDavid Silver's reinforcement learning course on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pWv7GOvuf0&list=PLqYmG7hTraZDM-OYHWgPebj2MfCFzFObQChris Summerfield's course How to Build a Brain: https://humaninformationprocessing.com/teaching/
Oct 8 2021
1 hr 28 mins
37. Jacob Bellmund: Deformed cognitive maps, abstract cognitive spaces, and how many dimensions can grid cells encode?
Jacob Bellmund is a postdoc at the Max Planck in Leipzig, studying spatial navigation, cognitive maps, and episodic memory. In this conversation, we talk about his research on deforming cognitive maps, abstract cognitive maps, and the translation of the spatial navigation literature to abstract spaces.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New episodes every Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps00:05: How Jacob started working on cognitive maps02:05: What are place cells, grid cells, and cognitive maps?08:49: Discussing Jacob's paper "Deforming the metric of cognitive maps distorts memory"28:34: Abstract cognitive spaces41:57: How far do findings from spatial navigation translate to cognitive spaces?50:40: How many dimensions can grid cells encode?58:01: What is Jacob going to work on next?Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastJacob's linksWebsite: https://www.jacobbellmund.com/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=_DRs4ukAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/jacobbellmundBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJTwitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweetsReferencesAuger, ..., & Maguire (2017). Efficacy of navigation may be influenced by retrosplenial cortex-mediated learning of landmark stability. Neuropsychologia.Bellmund, ..., & Doeller (2016). Grid-cell representations in mental simulation. Elife.Bellmund, ..., & Doeller (2018). Navigating cognition: Spatial codes for human thinking. Science.Bellmund,  ... , & Doeller (2020). Deforming the metric of cognitive maps distorts memory. Nat Hum Behav. Jacob wrote a Blog Post about his Nature Human Behaviour article: https://socialsciences.nature.com/posts/55610-distorting-human-memory?channel_id=1745-behind-the-paperButler, ..., & Giocomo (2019). Remembered reward locations restructure entorhinal spatial maps. Science.Constantinescu, ..., & Behrens (2016). Organizing conceptual knowledge in humans with a gridlike code. Science.Doeller, ..., & Burgess (2010). Evidence for grid cells in a human memory network. Nature.Hafting,  ... , & Moser (2005). Microstructure of a spatial map in the entorhinal cortex. Nature.Gärdenfors (2004). Conceptual spaces: The geometry of thought. MIT press.Ginosar,  ... , & Ulanovsky (2021). Locally ordered representation of 3D space in the entorhinal cortex. Nature.Grieves,  ... , & Jeffery (2021). Irregular distribution of grid cell firing fields in rats exploring a 3D volumetric space. Nature Neuro. Kim & Doeller (2021). Adaptive cognitive maps for curved surfaces in the 3D world. bioRxiv. pKrupic,  ... , & O’Keefe (2015). Grid cell symmetry is shaped by environmental geometry. Nature.
Oct 1 2021
59 mins
36. Book club: The Invention of Nature (Humboldt biography) by Andrea Wulf, part 5 & general discussion
This is the third and final episode of our discussion of  Andrea Wulf's biography of Alexander von Humboldt, The Invention of Nature. In this episode, we will discuss part 5 and have a general discussion about the entire book. As always with the book club, in each episode we will talk about whatever happened, so there will be spoilers and it probably makes most sense if you have read as far as we have. For this series, I'm joined by Cody Kommers, former guest of the podcast (episode 4), fellow podcaster, and fellow PhD student in cognitive neuroscience. Cody has a particular interest in travel and psychology.Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastCody's linksWebsite: https://www.codykommers.com/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=ImTtx_kAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/codykommersNewsletter: https://codykommers.substack.com/Ben's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJTwitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweetsReferencesHumboldt (1807). Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the new continent during the years 1799-1804. G. Bell.Humboldt (1845-62). Cosmos: a sketch of a physical description of the universe. Harper. Isaacson (2011). Steve Jobs. Simon & SchusterMenand (2002). The metaphysical club: A story of ideas in America. Macmillan.Menand (2021). The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War. Farrar, Strauss & Giroux.Pausas & Bond (2019). Humboldt and the reinvention of nature. Journal of Ecology.Poe (1848). Eureka: a prose poem.(An essay on the material and spiritual universe.). GP Putnam.Rillig, Kiessling, Borsch, Gessler, Greenwood, Hofer ... & Jeltsch (2015). Biodiversity research: data without theory—theory without data. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.Wulf (2015). The invention of nature: Alexander von Humboldt's new world. Knopf.
Sep 24 2021
1 hr 4 mins
35. Book club: The Invention of Nature (Humboldt biography) by Andrea Wulf, parts 3 & 4
This is the second episode of our discussion of  Andrea Wulf's biography of Alexander von Humboldt, The Invention of Nature. In this episode, we will discuss parts 3 and 4. As always with the book club, in each episode we will talk about whatever happened, so there will be spoilers and it probably makes most sense if you have read as far as we have. For this series, I'm joined by Cody Kommers, former guest of the podcast (episode 4), fellow podcaster, and fellow PhD student in cognitive neuroscience. Cody has a particular interest in travel and psychology.Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastCody's linksWebsite: https://www.codykommers.com/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=ImTtx_kAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/codykommersNewsletter: https://codykommers.substack.com/Ben's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJTwitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweetsReferencesBryson (2004). A short history of nearly everything. Broadway.Foer (2012). Moonwalking with Einstein: The art and science of remembering everything. Freud (1905). The interpretation of dreams.Geertz (1973). The interpretation of cultures. Humboldt & Bonpland (1807). Essay on the Geography of Plants. University of Chicago Press. Humboldt (1807). Views of nature. University of Chicago Press.Humboldt (1807). Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the new continent during the years 1799-1804. G. Bell.Humboldt (1845-62). Cosmos: a sketch of a physical description of the universe. Harper. Luria (1968). The Mind of a Mnemonist: A Little Book about a Vast Memory.Sacks (1985). The man who mistook his wife for a hat. Duckworth.Wulf (2015). The invention of nature: Alexander von Humboldt's new world. Knopf.
Sep 17 2021
1 hr 2 mins
34. Book club: The Invention of Nature (Humboldt biography) by Andrea Wulf, parts 1 & 233. Bryan Bruns: Applied sociology, 2*2 games, and how to transform tragedy into win-win
Bryan Bruns is an independent consultant sociologist, working mainly on water irrigation systems in southeast Asia. He also publishes academic papers about game theory. In this conversation, we talk about how he became a consultant sociologist, what that even means, how to learn foreign languages, his work on 2*2 games, how to transform a social dilemma into a win-win situation, and much more.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New episodes every Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:05: How Bryan became a consultant sociologist, working in southeast Asia on water management0:21:31: How to learn foreign languages0:31:35: But what does a consultant sociologist actually do? And what makes you good at it?0:49:36: Why not be a "regular" academic (instead of doing applied work)?0:54:32: Elinor Ostrom and the commons1:09:09: 2*2 games and the Prisoner's Dilemma1:16:34: Names for games1:38:30: From tragedy to win-win1:50:10: Asymmetric games1:58:06: Implementing game theoretic ideas in the real world with real people2:02:20: Reading recommendations for game theoryPodcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastBryan's linksWebsite: https://bryanbruns.com/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=lGVqCboAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/bryanbrunsBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJ Twitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweets   ReferencesBalliet, Parks & Joireman (2009). Social value orientation and cooperation in social dilemmas: A meta-analysis. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations.Binmore (2007). Game Theory: A Very Short Introduction Oxford University Press.Bruns (2015). Names for games: locating 2× 2 games. Games.Bruns (2018). From Tragedy to Win-Win Transforming Social Dilemmas in Commons. Georgetown Law Center, Washington DC, USA.Bruns & Meinzen-Dick (2000). Negotiating water rights.Hardin (1958). The tragedy of the commons. Science.Hare (2017). Survival of the friendliest: Homo sapiens evolved via selection for prosociality. Annual review of psychology.Munroe (2015). Thing explainer: complicated stuff in simple words. Hachette UK.Murphy, Ackermann & Handgraaf (2011). Measuring social value orientation. Judgment and Decision making.Nowak & Highfield (2011). Supercooperators: Altruism, evolution, and why we need each other to succeed. Simon and Schuster.Ostrom (1990). Governing the commons: The evolution of institutions for collective action. Cambridge University Press.Ostrom, Gardner & Walker (1994). Rules, games, and common-pool resources. University of Michigan Press.Rapoport, Guyer & Gordon (1976). The 2x2 game. University of Michigan Press.Robinson & Goforth (2005). The topology of the 2x2 games: a new periodic table (Vol. 3). Psychology Press.Tufte, E. (2001). The visual display of quantitative information."Mr condom": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechai_Viravaidya
Sep 3 2021
2 hrs 8 mins
32. Book discussion: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley31. Stuart Ritchie: Science Fictions, fraud, and open science
Stuart Ritchie is Lecturer at King's College London, where he studies behavioural genetics in relation to personality and cognitive ability. In this conversation, we don't talk about any of that though but instead focus on his book Science Fictions, a book about how science goes wrong, and the topics covered therein.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps0:00:41: Trying to replicate Bem (2011) Feeling the future0:09:58: Wy write Science Fictions?0:17:24: How to (get people to) adopt open science practices?0:36:31: Stuart will pay you if you find errors in Science Fictions0:46:44: Should scientific journals have an automatic way for reporting errors?0:56:52: Gorecki, Boulez, and cultural references1:01:45: Scientific fraud: Stapel, Macchiarini, and Hwang1:31:05: Will many small steps improve science sufficiently or do we need a revolution?Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastGuest's linksWebsite: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/stuart-ritchieBook website: https://www.sciencefictions.org/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=9TsCy3IAAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/stuartjritchieBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJ Twitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweets   References and further linksBem, D. J. (2011). Feeling the future: experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on cognition and affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.Leung, A. K. Y., Kim, S., Polman, E., Ong, L. S., Qiu, L., Goncalo, J. A., & Sanchez-Burks, J. (2012). Embodied metaphors and creative “acts”. Psychological Science.Nosek, B. A., Beck, E. D., Campbell, L., Flake, J. K., Hardwicke, T. E., Mellor, D. T., ... & Vazire, S. (2019). Preregistration is hard, and worthwhile. Trends in cognitive sciences.Quintana, D. S. (2020). A synthetic dataset primer for the biobehavioural sciences to promote reproducibility and hypothesis generation. Elife.Ritchie, S. J., Wiseman, R., & French, C. C. (2012). Failing the future: Three unsuccessful attempts to replicate Bem's ‘Retroactive Facilitation of Recall’ Effect. PloS One.Ritchie, S. (2020). Science fictions: How fraud, bias, negligence, and hype undermine the search for truth. Metropolitan Books.The Halloween challenge at Goldsmiths I helped out with: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2012/oct/31/halloween-challenge-psychics-scientific-trialStuart will pay you if you find errors in Science Fictions:  https://www.sciencefictions.org/corrections Pierre Boulez's notation for piano: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cD2SwVZBI80
Aug 20 2021
1 hr 33 mins
30. Book club: Killing Floor by Lee Child, chapters 27-end29. Anna Riedl: Cognitive science, effective altruism, and science communication
Anna Riedl is a cognitive scientist, currently finishing her MSc in cognitive science in Vienna. She is also founder of Effective Altruism Austria, and co-organiser of the Rationality Vienna Meetup. In this conversation, we talk about cognitive science, rationality, effective altruism, visualisation in science communication, and much more.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps00:04: Studying as a firstgen07:35: Anna's MSc in cognitive science20:01: What real-world problem is Anna trying to solve?26:46: When are you qualified to give a talk on a topic?35:20: Depth vs. breadth and fun vs. precision in science communication43:21: Visualisation in science (communication)Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastGuest's linksWebsite: https://www.riedlanna.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnnaLeptikonBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJ Twitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweets   ReferencesBorner, K. (2015). Atlas of knowledge: anyone can map. MIT Press.Burton, R. A. (2009). On being certain: Believing you are right even when you're not. Macmillan.Larkin, J. H., & Simon, H. A. (1987). Why a diagram is (sometimes) worth ten thousand words. Cognitive science.Marr, D., & Poggio, T. (1977). From understanding computation to understanding neural circuitry. Neurosciences Research Program Bulletin. Marr, D. (1982). Vision: A computational investigation into the human representation and processing of visual information.Links discussed 3blue1brown's YouTube channel with maths visualisations: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAwAnna's interview on Future Fossils: https://shows.acast.com/futurefossils/episodes/166Anna's map of cognitive science: https://www.riedlanna.com/cognitivesciencemap.htmlAnna's prints (on T-shirt, blanket, shower curtain, etc.) of the map of cognitive science: https://www.redbubble.com/de/shop/ap/64207253Marie and Otto Neurath's Isotype collection: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotype_(picture_language)Medium article about Marie Neurath: https://medium.com/nightingale/the-missing-legacy-of-marie-neurath-f9800733d1fc
Aug 6 2021
50 mins
28. Book club: Killing Floor by Lee Child, chapters 15-21 & 22-2627. Nichola Raihani: The evolution of punishment, ultimate & proximate explanations, and cleaner fish
Nichola Raihani is a professor of evolution and behaviour at University College London. Her research focuses on the evolution of punishment and paranoia. In this conversation, we talk about the fieldwork she did for her PhD in the Kalahari desert, the evolution of punishment, proximate and ultimate explanations, cleaner fish, and Nichola's book The Social Instinct.BJKS Podcast is a podcast about neuroscience, psychology, and anything vaguely related, hosted by Benjamin James Kuper-Smith. New conversations every other Friday. You can find the podcast on all podcasting platforms (e.g., Spotify, Apple/Google Podcasts, etc.).Timestamps00:05: Surnames in science03:33: Behavioural ecology or psychology?13:37: What's it like to do fieldwork in the Kalahari desert, habituating birds to humans?20:41: The evolution of punishment29:51: Proximate and ultimate explanations in evolution46:05: What can we learn about human cooperation by studying cleaner fish?Podcast linksWebsite: https://bjks.buzzsprout.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BjksPodcastNichola's linksWebsite: http://www.seb-lab.org/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.de/citations?user=u6_SEO4AAAAJTwitter: https://twitter.com/nicholaraihaniBen's linksWebsite: www.bjks.blog/Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=-nWNfvcAAAAJ Twitter:  https://twitter.com/bjks_tweets   ReferencesAndreoni, J. (1990). Impure altruism and donations to public goods: A theory of warm-glow giving. The economic journal.Clutton-Brock, T. H., & Parker, G. A. (1995). Punishment in animal societies. Nature.Laland, K., Uller, T., Feldman, M., Sterelny, K., Müller, G. B., Moczek, A., ... & Strassmann, J. E. (2014). Does evolutionary theory need a rethink?. Nature News.Laland, K. N., Sterelny, K., Odling-Smee, J., Hoppitt, W., & Uller, T. (2011). Cause and effect in biology revisited: is Mayr’s proximate-ultimate dichotomy still useful? Science.Raihani, N.J. (2021). The Social Instinct. Penguin. Raihani, N. J., & Bshary, R. (2019). Punishment: one tool, many uses. Evolutionary Human Sciences. Raihani, N. J., Thornton, A., & Bshary, R. (2012). Punishment and cooperation in nature. Trends in ecology & evolution.Raihani, N. J., & McAuliffe, K. (2012). Human punishment is motivated by inequity aversion, not a desire for reciprocity. Biology letters.Raihani, N. J., McAuliffe, K., Brosnan, S. F., & Bshary, R. (2012). Are cleaner fish, Labroides dimidiatus, inequity averse?. Animal Behaviour.Raihani, N. J., Grutter, A. S., & Bshary, R. (2010). Punishers benefit from third-party punishment in fish. Science.Tinbergen, N. (1963). On aims and methods of ethology. Zeitschrift für Tierpsychologie.
Jul 23 2021
57 mins

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