Empower Tusc

Get Level Podcast Network

Join us each episode with your host, Empower Tusc Coordinator Jodi Salvo, as we deliver current information to help educate and raise awareness about substance use and mental health in our community. Jodi brings information from all over Tuscarawas and surrounding counties, including resources from local school districts, law enforcement, treatment agencies, political offices, state representatives, and more. You'll enjoy these casual conversations among people working together to increase prevention in our community. The Anti-Drug Coalition is part of the Get Level Podcast Network, bringing agencies and organizations together to reach listeners in Tuscarawas County. To help support the show, visit glow.fm/adctusc. For more information on the ADC, visit www.adctusc.org. For information on the Get Level Podcast Network, visit www.getlevelpod.com.

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Project Hope Kicks Off on August 21 at Music on the Square
Aug 16 2021
Project Hope Kicks Off on August 21 at Music on the Square
Beginning August 21st, Tuscarawas County residents will begin seeing silhouettes placed across nine communities in the county. Each community will display:     •  One black silhouette – representing deaths in the county     •  One gray silhouette – representing overdoses per city (that did not result in death)     •  One yellow silhouette – representing “There is Always Hope”     •  Yard sign promoting the New Tuscarawas County Hope Line (330) 663-6812 The silhouettes, 30 across the county, will be placed in highly visible areas. Yard signs will accompany the silhouettes featuring the New Tuscarawas County Hope Line number (330) 663-6812. This is a one call, one person, no redirect number. Rachel, the access navigator, will answer the phone or call you back to help you access the most appropriate substance use and addiction treatment services. She can also provide support and resource information to families or loved ones who have a person struggling with substance use or addiction in their life. Participating communities include Bolivar, Dover, Mineral City, Newcomerstown, New Philadelphia, Port Washington, Strasburg, Sugarcreek, Tuscarawas, and the Twin City area (Dennison/Uhrichsville). This effort is in response to an all-time record high in overdose deaths in 2020. March of 2021 recorded an all-time one-month record high of overdose deaths in the county. The Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition and Addiction Task Force would like to raise awareness that there is help and there is hope for persons who struggle with substance use and addiction. This initiative is to help community members better understand addiction and to help persons struggling know that help is available. “We want to create clear visibility that there are services that can help and that there is always hope,” said Jodi Salvo, Coordinator of the Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition. “We want to continue to encourage our community to seek and share resources and to realize the importance of reaching out and checking in on each other.” The silhouettes will be distributed as the initiative is launched on August 21st at Music on the Square in New Philadelphia. Please join us at 4:00pm to hear a recovery story by a local young woman, and a proclamation from a County Commissioner recognizing both National Overdose Awareness Day and National Recovery Month. The overall message of this initiative is that Tuscarawas County is a community that cares, and “There is Always Hope.” Residents are invited to attend the August 21st event at Music on the Square and to share the message of hope and the information and resources made available through Project Hope. For more information about the local work of the ADC, visit adctusc.org. For information about services available in the county, contact the ADAMHS Board at adamhtc.org. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Project Hope Kicks Off on August 21 at Music on the Square
Aug 16 2021
Project Hope Kicks Off on August 21 at Music on the Square
Beginning August 21st, Tuscarawas County residents will begin seeing silhouettes placed across nine communities in the county. Each community will display:     •  One black silhouette – representing deaths in the county     •  One gray silhouette – representing overdoses per city (that did not result in death)     •  One yellow silhouette – representing “There is Always Hope”     •  Yard sign promoting the New Tuscarawas County Hope Line (330) 663-6812 The silhouettes, 30 across the county, will be placed in highly visible areas. Yard signs will accompany the silhouettes featuring the New Tuscarawas County Hope Line number (330) 663-6812. This is a one call, one person, no redirect number. Rachel, the access navigator, will answer the phone or call you back to help you access the most appropriate substance use and addiction treatment services. She can also provide support and resource information to families or loved ones who have a person struggling with substance use or addiction in their life. Participating communities include Bolivar, Dover, Mineral City, Newcomerstown, New Philadelphia, Port Washington, Strasburg, Sugarcreek, Tuscarawas, and the Twin City area (Dennison/Uhrichsville). This effort is in response to an all-time record high in overdose deaths in 2020. March of 2021 recorded an all-time one-month record high of overdose deaths in the county. The Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition and Addiction Task Force would like to raise awareness that there is help and there is hope for persons who struggle with substance use and addiction. This initiative is to help community members better understand addiction and to help persons struggling know that help is available. “We want to create clear visibility that there are services that can help and that there is always hope,” said Jodi Salvo, Coordinator of the Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition. “We want to continue to encourage our community to seek and share resources and to realize the importance of reaching out and checking in on each other.” The silhouettes will be distributed as the initiative is launched on August 21st at Music on the Square in New Philadelphia. Please join us at 4:00pm to hear a recovery story by a local young woman, and a proclamation from a County Commissioner recognizing both National Overdose Awareness Day and National Recovery Month. The overall message of this initiative is that Tuscarawas County is a community that cares, and “There is Always Hope.” Residents are invited to attend the August 21st event at Music on the Square and to share the message of hope and the information and resources made available through Project Hope. For more information about the local work of the ADC, visit adctusc.org. For information about services available in the county, contact the ADAMHS Board at adamhtc.org. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Hope Sunday is August 29, 2021
Aug 13 2021
Hope Sunday is August 29, 2021
The Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition invites churches to participate in the fourth annual HOPE Sunday. The Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition is partnering again with more local churches across denominations to bring hope to communities impacted by issues around mental health and drug addiction.  On Sunday, August 29, all Tuscarawas and Carroll County churches are invited to participate in Hope Sunday. It is an opportunity to create awareness around areas of concern in our local communities, and an opportunity to acknowledge the vital role that local churches and community members can play in bringing hope and light to those hurting and struggling.  As part of the countywide event, The Ezekiel Project has created a new short film called In One-A-Chord. This film will encourage churches across communities to better understand the difficult issues a person might face and to reach out as a beacon of hope and light in our communities.  Participating churches will receive a 4-minute video and are asked to share it with their congregations. Churches will be provided a brief script that can be used before or after the video, along with bulletin inserts that include prayer requests around addiction and information on local resources. Churches will be given all the resources needed to share the event.  Last year’s event included participation from 100 churches across Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties. This year we hope to mobilize this effort even further. “We want to share a resonating message with the community that acknowledges that, while life can be hard, each and every person has extreme, unwavering value and purpose,” explained Jodi Salvo, Coordinator of the Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition. “We want each and every person in our county to know there is help and hope when facing substance use addiction and that our community churches are a place where persons can go to find love and support.”  Churches interested in participating are encouraged to contact  Jodi Salvo at (330) 440-7320 to receive more information and material.  Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Youth Vaping - What the Schools See
Jun 2 2021
Youth Vaping - What the Schools See
This will be the last podcast episode before summer begins. But don't worry - Jodi Salvo and the ADC will be back in the fall before the new school year begins! But on this episode, substitute host Autumn Poland is joined by Diana Smith, Susan Monticelli and Michele Henry to discuss the increase in vaping in our schools. Autumn is a health educator at the Tuscarawas County Health Department and the co-chair for the Vaping Task Force within the Anti-Drug Coalition. Diana is from OhioGuidestone and is also a member of the ADC. Susan is a school counselor at Claymont Middle School, and Michele is the assistant principal at Claymont Middle School. The Anti-Drug Coalition recently gave "Catch My Breath" presentations at Claymont Middle School. The Catch My Breath program is the only evidence-based program that deals with vaping. Claymont was the first school to incorporate the program to help combat the drastic rise in vaping among school-aged children. The increase in vaping is a nationwide problem for schools, teachers and parents for many reasons. Listen as the professionals from Claymont explain why vaping is difficult to find. Vaping devices come in countless colors, shapes, and sizes, and many are made to look like common, everyday items like flash drives. The devices are easily concealable, making it challenging for adults to catch the devices on kids. Vaping products are made like candy for kids, available in all kinds of different flavors. Kids think vaping is harmless compared to smoking, but research shows that is not true whatsoever. This is a conversation that all parents need to hear. Even if your child is not vaping, they could be selling vaping products to other kids. It's important for parents and adults to be current with the trends and understand how students are buying, selling, and using these devices. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
The Y2Y Podcast: The Truth Kids Need to Hear About Drugs and Alcohol
May 17 2021
The Y2Y Podcast: The Truth Kids Need to Hear About Drugs and Alcohol
The Tuscarawas County Anti-Drug Coalition empowers youth to live drug-free lives. And what better way to connect with the youth in our county than through messages presented by the youth. This podcast episode features members of the Y2Y (Youth-toYouth) group, Brock West and Phebe Farmer, discussing the true story of addiction with local Christian rap musical artist Austin Kamban (Kamban). Kamban recounts his experiences with drug and alcohol addiction and how his relationship with God has developed and grown. His faith and belief have fueled his recovery. Kamban talks about how he began his rap career writing secular music, speaking out against God. But God had other plans. You see, Kamban's dreams and visions of performing rap music were always real, but he wasn't pursuing them in the way God had intended. Addiction crippled his true potential, and he continued to numb the pain in his life with drugs and alcohol. You'll hear how Kamban allowed God to show him how he was truly meant to pursue his dreams, and now his music is encouraging and inspirational to others in need - just as God had intended. Don't miss this powerful episode featuring the truths that kids need to hear about how drugs and alcohol will alter their lives. This conversation between youth and a young adult is exactly what we need to empower our youth to live drug free. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Suicide Awareness - The Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group
May 10 2021
Suicide Awareness - The Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group
Our Suicide Awareness mini-series wraps up on this episode featuring the Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group. Jodi Salvo is again joined by Kristie Wilkin and Jenn Dotto from the Suicide Support Group, as well as Natalie Bollon from the ADAMHS Board, to discuss the group in greater detail. You will learn: The mission of the group When the group meets What the group does How the group has helped the community When to get involved with the group (sooner for some, later for others) The new coalition being formed Sometimes in life, events occur that fracture the very foundation on which we stand. Our life, as we have known it, is forever changed and we find ourselves in an unexpected struggle, first to survive and then to move forward. We at the Tusc/Carroll Survivor of Suicide Loss Support Group are here to help you cope with a loss to suicide. Our forum is one that recognizes and respects the courage and resilience of suicide loss in all stages of your personal journey. The group is confidential - we also have a confidential Facebook page where we support and communicate as well. We are a part of a group no one wants to join, but we are here for you if you are a survivor of suicide loss. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Suicide Awareness - Hope Squad with Tusky Valley School District
Apr 26 2021
Suicide Awareness - Hope Squad with Tusky Valley School District
Our Suicide Awareness series kicked off a couple weeks ago, featuring the QPR Gatekeeper training from the Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group. On this episode, Jenn Dotto and Jodi Salvo discuss the Hope Squad at Tusky Valley School District with High School Counselor Mandy EcElwee and High School Principal Jason Phillips. What does the Tusky Valley Hope Squad do? TVHS has 30 Hope Squad members who work with outside communities, such as Survivors of Suicide, and they also have trained high school staff to instill resilience among students. The Hope Squad improves school spirit and gives back to the school and the community. Suicide awareness is more important now than ever due to the increased stresses and pressures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and school shutdowns. Students are suffering from lack of personal interaction with other students and teachers, and virtual learning and distancing restrictions only make learning more difficult and, for some, almost impossible. Tune in to learn how Tusky Valley and the Hope Squad are working to educate and train students about suicide awareness. Their efforts are saving lives and improving their school and community. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
Suicide Awareness - QPR Gatekeeper Training with the Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group
Apr 5 2021
Suicide Awareness - QPR Gatekeeper Training with the Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group
We're kicking off a new mini-series focused on Suicide Awareness featuring the Tuscarawas County Survivors of Suicide Loss Support Group. On this episode, hear from Suicide Prevention Advocates Kristie Wilkin and Jenn Dotto as they explain the QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) Certified Gatekeeper Training. The QPR philosophy is: Question - "Are you considering taking your own life?" Persuade - "Let's go get help." Refer - "Knowing the right resources to go to for help" QPR is not a form of counseling; rather, it's intended to offer hope through positive action. The training helps Gatekeepers to recognize warning signs, clues, and suicidal communication of people in crisis and skills to act vigorously in preventing a possible tragedy. Much like CPR and the Heimlich maneuver, the use of QPR may save a life. The QPR training goals include being able to recognize someone at risk for suicide, possess intervention skills, and be able to provide referral sources to aid someone in need. If you or your group are interested in Gatekeeper Training, please email Kristie, Jenn, and Pam at 4SuicideLossTusc@gmail.com. This page is monitored daily by all 3 Gatekeepers. When emailing, please let us know if evenings, a Saturday morning, or another time works best for you. The Gatekeepers will get back to you as soon as possible to provide training dates and times. You can also follow Gatekeeper news at the "Walk into the Light" Facebook page. This page is used to update highlights of the suicide prevention walk and will now include info on trainings and more. The Question Persuade Refer training is a curriculum that communities are adopting across the country to meet this need. The cost of the class is $20.00 to cover materials and lasts 2 hours in duration. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 9: Yesterday's History, Tomorrow's a Mystery, Today is a Gift
Mar 22 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 9: Yesterday's History, Tomorrow's a Mystery, Today is a Gift
Welcome back to another edition of our podcast series, "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me." On today's show, we welcome an incredible man who's celebrating 14 years of sobriety. Huck Hart joins Jodi Salvo to share his story of addiction as he takes us on a heartfelt journey through darkness and into light. Huck talks about his early years and introduction to substance use. He talks about how an immediate addiction to alcohol at age 12 led to marijuana use, which later led to cocaine, meth, heroin, and more. Huck fed his addiction for 36 years. During that time, he spent time in jail, accumulated 32 felonies, overdosed and died 3 times, and pushed away everything and everyone good in his life. All just to feed his addiction. Your heart will feel Huck's pain when he explains how his life had gotten so low that he decided to leave his fate to a gun and a game of Russian Roulette. Huck's last name is truly fitting as Mr. Hart shares his heart with all our listeners. His story of victory with God is nothing short of inspiring. As Huck says many times, for years he lived life Huck's way. Now, he lives life God's way. And life is good. If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, call Rachel Wentworth at the substance use Hope Line at 330-663-6812. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 8: Your Life is Worth Fighting for Because You're Worthy of Life
Mar 8 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 8: Your Life is Worth Fighting for Because You're Worthy of Life
Our "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me" series continues with special guest Derrick Jenkins. Derrick is celebrating 25 years sober this month, a tremendous accomplishment that he discuss on this episode. Derrick enjoyed a good childhood growing up in Canton with his parents and 6 siblings. He enjoyed sports and music with his family and friends. But in his early teens, Derrick's group of friends pressured him into substance use. Alcohol led to marijuana, and eventually marijuana led to crack cocaine. When Derrick used cocaine for the first time, he was instantly addicted. Extremely conscious about health and fitness, Derrick stayed away from smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol - but he could not stop using cocaine. Eventually, his addiction led to eyesight issues that resulted in 7 eye surgeries. You have to hear Derrick's recovery story. His faith in God kept him alive and opened up doors and opportunities for Derrick to not only survive, but to also thrive in his new sober life. Now, he champions others through recovery as a recovery coach, counselor, motivator, etc. His voice is calming but powerful, and his message is truth. Derrick talks about his early refusal to admit he had a problem. Later on, he rejected the idea that counseling could help him. Overcoming the stigma of counseling was difficult for him, but once he did, he realized counseling can help every person. It provided him with support and also taught him the skills he needed to cope with adversity in life and strengthen his recovery. Derrick's message revolves around the fact that your life is worth fighting for - recovery and sobriety are worth fighting for - because you're worthy of living a happy and healthy life. Don't let your past mistakes determine your current and future worth. The only person who needs to believe you're worthy is YOU - because God already says you are. You can visit (www.derrickvjenkins.com) to learn more about Derrick and his story! If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, call Rachel Wentworth at the substance use Hope Line at 330-663-6812. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 7: You Matter and Your Recovery Matters
Feb 22 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 7: You Matter and Your Recovery Matters
Our "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me" series continues with a different perspective on addiction. Jennifer Kiko, Director of Outreach for Congressman Bob Gibbs, joins Jodi Salvo to discuss her experiences with loved ones struggling through addiction. Jennifer lost her sister to addiction. She explains how, growing up, addiction and similar topics were not discussed within the family. It's all too easy for someone who doesn't understand addiction to say, "Why can't you just stop?" or "You just need to want to quit." For Jennifer's sister, the one person who connected with her and became her supporting person was their uncle. But when he passed away, Jennifer's sister was left alone, and that was the final push. Now, Jennifer is on a mission to help those struggling with addiction. She has spent many years learning and understanding addiction, and her message to the community is simple yet powerful: even if you don't understand addiction, you can still love people. And if you are someone struggling with addiction, please know that YOU matter, and your recovery matters. If you've listened to the previous episodes in this series, you've learned how crucial it is for recovering addicts to have a caring and supporting community around them. And if you're in recovery, you need to trust the people who want to walk alongside you and see you thrive. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 6: People Are Rooting for Your Recovery
Feb 15 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 6: People Are Rooting for Your Recovery
Part 6 of our "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me" series brings Megan Scharver to the table with Jodi Salvo. Megan works for OhioGuidestone and is the SUD Counselor at River Haven, which is the new name for Harbor House. River Haven is an opportunity for people struggling with addiction. Megan has been using this series of podcasts to help educate the people she works with about what information they should be passing on to their children. The podcasts have also sparked in-depth conversations about each person's personal story and what role substance abuse has played in their own life. Understanding our own history with addiction can accomplish multiple things. For starters, it can help change the trajectory of your future and lead to success in recovery. Understanding your past can also equip you to help others avoid entering a dangerous path or step onto a healing path. One key concept that Megan stresses is having patience with those in recovery. These women and men are fighting a battle, and they're relearning how to live without their addictions. Just as we're patient with those recovering from a broken leg or dislocated disk, we need to be patient with those recovering from addiction. It's important for the community to understand how addiction changes the brain, and it's also important for those in recovery to know that people in the community are rooting for your success. We all trip on our walk through life, but if we walk together, we can help pick each other up when we fall. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 5: Don't Go It Alone - Fellowship Leads to Recovery
Feb 8 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 5: Don't Go It Alone - Fellowship Leads to Recovery
Thanks for tuning into Part 5 of our series, "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me." On this episode, Jodi Salvo has an in-depth conversation with a man who's been in recovery for 26 years. John Bazaar shares his story with alcoholism that began when he first left his childhood home at 18 years old. Growing up, John's family never introduced him to substance use. In fact, they never even had alcohol in the home. However, one detail he never learned until he was older is that his grand father struggled with addiction. John highlights this key point that parents need to talk to their kids about addiction, how it works, and what the consequences are. Denying a family member has a problem, or denying that a family member COULD develop a problem, does not avoid the problem - it actually increases the likelihood. When John went to college, he developed alcoholism within just a few weeks. He drank to fit in with his friends, and he drank because he liked the drunk effect and feeling like he was Superman. He reflects now that he had no clue the depth of trouble he was in. John struggled with his addiction for years, working various jobs while trying to finish his engineering degree. But every time his addiction knocked him down, he blamed someone or something else. It wasn't until years later that he finally took responsibility for his actions. He was introduced to a 12-step program, and everything changed when he realized he wasn't alone - there were other people just like him struggling with the same things. For years, John had failed to conquer his addiction alone. But through his new fellowship and community, he was finally able to overcome the alcohol. This brief summary doesn't do justice to John's incredible story. You'll be moved by his open and honest story and his willingness to share with anyone who needs to hear it. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 4: Recovery Court Can Save Your Life
Feb 1 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 4: Recovery Court Can Save Your Life
Welcome to Part 4 of our series, What I Wish Someone Had Told Me. On this episode, Jodi Salvo and Kathy Bazaar are joined by Jes Deemer, a recovering drug addict who reflects on all she's learned during her experiences with drugs. Raised in a good home with parents who didn't even drink, Jes's story is much different than others we've shared. She started using heroin when she was 19, and her addiction quickly spiraled out of control. The first and foremost thing she wishes someone would have told her is to not be so naive to think addiction couldn't happen to her. Now, she understands how drugs physically change the landscape of the human brain - and this can happen to anyone. Listen to Jes's story about falling into addiction, facing legal trouble, dealing with relapse, all the while knowing that her family - especially her daughter - needed her. She also highlights recovery court here in Tuscarawas County and how she came to realize that recovery court is filled with people who care about her and want to help her. In the end, she believes recovery court saved her life. One more point Jes stresses is that addicts need to work through their fears that everyone who tries to help them has a hidden agenda. You must learn to forgive yourself and accept that people truly want to help you and see you thrive. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 3: There's No Reason You Should Be in Despair
Jan 25 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 3: There's No Reason You Should Be in Despair
Welcome to Part 3 of our series, "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me." On this episode, Jodi Salvo has a ground-breaking conversation with Abriel Melchor. Abriel is a recovering drug addict who now coaches others as a Peer Recovery Supporter for OhioGuidestone. Abriel's story explains how addiction can begin as easily as any family hobby. She recalls her introduction to drug use at 9 years old as it was a common household activity to drink beer and smoke marijuana, no matter the age. Then, she explains how the passing of her brother led her addiction to spiral as she sought any and all means to numb the pain of her grief. For Abriel, her drug use became all about finding ways to not feel anything. As she got older, she continued to suppress the pain and trauma of her early years with drugs. She was so set in her ways that she firmly believes there is nothing anyone could've told her that would have changed her behavior. But as the conversation progresses, key realizations emerge, and some essential themes develop; You must confront the underlying reasons for your addiction; Addiction is a disease; You need to learn your "why"; and most importantly, there's no reason anyone should be alone and in despair. This community is filled with people who are ready and willing to help you regain your life. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 2: You Have Intrinsic Value and Worth
Jan 18 2021
What I Wish Someone Had Told Me - Part 2: You Have Intrinsic Value and Worth
On Part 2 of our "What I Wish Someone Had Told Me" series, Jodi sits down with Kathy Bazaar to get a first-hand perspective from a recovering alcoholic. Once consumed by her addiction, Kathy now coaches other addicts through recovery as a Peer Recovery Supporter for OhioGuidestone. Kathy's insight about what she wishes someone would have told her many years ago sheds light on a fundamental problem surrounding addiction in our society: open communication. Kathy wishes someone had explained to her what addiction was so that, as a child, she would've better understood her father. Kathy wishes someone had informed her that addictive personalities can be inherited and that she may be at greater risk because of her family history. But most importantly, Kathy wishes someone had told her when she was young that she had intrinsic worth and value. So many youth journey through their developmental years feeling like they don't matter and that no one cares about them. We need to build a generation of young people who recognize that they matter, they have a purpose, and they have greatness within. Visit (www.adctusc.org) for all your information about the Coalition and different types of drug use and prevention. Listen at (www.getlevelpod.com/adc). Or find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Watch on YouTube! HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW! Please help support the show at (www.glow.fm/adctusc)