Latin America in Focus

AS/COA Online

Go in depth on the latest trends in Latin American politics, economics, and culture in this podcast series by Americas Society/Council of the Americas. read less
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On the Ground and Online: Venezuela's Electoral Battle
Yesterday
On the Ground and Online: Venezuela's Electoral Battle
Since he came to power 11 years ago, Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro has been stacking the decks in his political favor. But will he hit a wall in the July 28 election? The regime disqualified popular rival candidate Maria Corina Machado, yet a unified opposition is leading the polls. “[The Maduro government] could try to do a mega fraud, but the political costs, even within the ruling coalition, could be very high,” journalist and political analyst Tony Frangie Mawad tells AS/COA’s Guillermo Zubillaga in an on-the-ground view of the electoral competition.The fight to govern Venezuela is being played out online as well. Mariví Marin Vázquez, founder and executive director of digital observatory ProBox, explains why the country’s voters have turned to social media to get news. She told AS/COA’s Carin Zissis how the regime exploits social media algorithms as it seeks to soften Maduro’s image, even as online tools offer an opportunity for independent news sources and civil society to share information.Access other episodes of Latin America in Focus at www.as-coa.org/podcast and send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgLearn more about Venezuela’s elections at: www.as-coa.org/2024Read ProBox resources on Venezuelan social media use (t.ly/y7bh3) and the Maduro regime’s use of online tools (t.ly/Kk1NG).Read an Americas Quarterly article by AS/COA’s Board Chair Andrés Gluski and President/CEO Susan Segal about why this electoral round may be different: t.ly/NDCxhThis is the seventh episode in our 2024 election series. Prior episodes covered what comes next for Mexico after Claudia’s Sheinbaum’s electoral win, how Latin America figures into the Trump-Biden battle, the Dominican Republic’s unique political culture, the economic agenda for Panama’s next president, the youth vote in Mexico, and Nayib Bukele’s global reach. Find this content and more in this year's election guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024The music in this podcast is “Nos volveremos a encontrar,” performed by Venezuelan singer-songwriter Geraldyn García and cuatro player Daniel Molina for Americas Society. Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.org    Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
How Can Latin America Fix Its Water Crisis?
Jun 26 2024
How Can Latin America Fix Its Water Crisis?
Latin America, the biggest source of freshwater in the world, is running dry. Amid record-breaking temperatures, 150 million people live in water-scarce areas and water insecurity is becoming a new normal for many.  But solutions exist. World Meteorological Organization’s Rodney Martinez and Acción Andina’s Florent Kaiser cover how Latin American countries can address the region’s water crisis. They talk how science and early warning systems are available for use, that simple solutions can restore water access in dry areas, and how water can be a decisive argument when engaging stakeholders to take action.   Read more about this episode: https://tinyurl.com/yvr7p5n3Read an Americas Quarterly issue on water: https://tinyurl.com/ytt3xkmzRead WMO’s recent report on the State of the Climate in Latin America and the Caribbean 2023 https://tinyurl.com/2kpptghkGet other episodes of Latin America in Focus at www.as-coa.org/podcast and send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgThe music in this podcast was performed by Tiganá Santana for Americas Society.You can catch this concert and others on our YouTube channel. Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.org  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
In Mexico, Claudia Sheinbaum Won Big. Now What?
Jun 6 2024
In Mexico, Claudia Sheinbaum Won Big. Now What?
Claudia Sheinbaum and her Morena party won Mexico’s June 2 election by a landslide, and that means the country’s first woman president is set to have a huge mandate. What will she do with it? On the ground in Mexico City, AS/COA Online spoke to voters and then three experts on concerns and priorities for Sheinbaum’s sexenio. One question kept coming up: How will Sheinbaum differ from her predecessor, Andrés Manuel López Obrador? Hear from Oscar Ocampo of the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness on energy and climate, Brenda Estefan of IPADE Business School and Reforma on the future of Mexican foreign affairs, and Isaac Morales of FTI Consulting on the country’s cybersecurity policy. This is the sixth episode in our 2024 election series. Prior episodes covered how Latin America figures into the Trump-Biden battle, the Dominican Republic’s unique political culture, the economic agenda for Panama’s next president, the youth vote in Mexico, and Nayib Bukele’s global reach. Find this content and more electoral insight in this year guide at www.as-coa.org/2024. Watch Claudia Sheinbaum speak at a COA event in Mexico City in April 2024. https://www.as-coa.org/watchlisten/programa-exclusivo-claudia-sheinbaum-candidata-presidencial-de-mexicoGet other episodes of Latin America in Focus at www.as-coa.org/podcast and send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgThe music in this podcast includes “La folia,” “Descarga Gandinga, Mondongo y Sandunga,” and “Llorarás” all performed for Americas Society.Learn about upcoming concerts at: www.musicoftheamericas.org Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
How Latin America Fits into the Biden-Trump Battle
May 16 2024
How Latin America Fits into the Biden-Trump Battle
Buckle up: U.S. politics are headed for a bumpy ride. And the issue of migration, particularly at the U.S. Southern border, will significantly influence this year’s elections. In this episode, AS/COA Vice President Eric Farnsworth moderates a conversation between two top political consultants—a Democrat and a Republican—to get a view of Latin America's impact on the U.S. electoral scenario. Doug Sosnik is senior advisor at The Brunswick Group and served as a political consultant for, among others top Democrats, former President Bill Clinton. Meanwhile, Russ Schriefer, founding partner at Strategic Partners & Media, has advised high-ranking Republicans, such as Presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.The conversation took place at the State Department during COA’s Washington Conference on the Americas on May 7. Watch the panel: t.ly/cUBlx  Catch other speakers and panels from the conference: t.ly/W2I7VThis is the fifth episode in our 2024 election series. Prior episodes covered the economic agenda for Panama’s next president, the youth vote in Mexico, Nayib Bukele’s global reach, and how the DR election bucks regional political trends. Get this content and more electoral insights in this year's Election Guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024Fabrizio Ricalde produced this episode. Luis Leme is the executive producer. Carin Zissis is the host. Get other episodes of Latin America in Focus at www.as-coa.org/podcast and send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org The music in this podcast is "A mis hermanos,” performed by C4 Trio for Americas Society. Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVJ57F2TPl4Find out about upcoming concerts at: www.musicoftheamericas.org Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
How the Dominican Republic Breaks Latin America’s Election Mold
Apr 25 2024
How the Dominican Republic Breaks Latin America’s Election Mold
The Dominican Republic’s Luis Abinader is one of the most popular leaders in Latin America, if not the world, so it may come as little surprise that Abinader appears to be on comfortable footing to win in the first round of the country’s presidential vote on May 19. But then again, the country’s political climate differs from that of the rest of Latin America in that presidents tend to be popular, elections don’t usually go to runoffs, and polarization levels remain low. In this episode, Temple University Professor Emeritus Rosario Espinal talks with AS/COA Online’s Carin Zissis, providing a larger context to this Dominican electoral cycle.This is the fourth episode in our 2024 election series. Prior episodes covered the economic agenda for Panama’s next president, the youth vote in Mexico, and Nayib Bukele’s global reach. Get this content and more electoral insight in this year guide at www.as-coa.org/2024. Access a poll tracker for the Dominican presidential race.We will host President Abinader at the 54th Washington Conference on the Americas. Learn more about the May 8, 2024 event: https://www.as-coa.org/wca2024Read an Americas Quarterly profile of the president: https://americasquarterly.org/article/the-rare-popular-incumbent/Jon Orbach produced this episode. Maria Despradel contributed reporting. Carin Zissis is the host. Get other episodes of Latin America in Focus at www.as-coa.org/podcast and send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgThe music in this podcast is "Pacholí” performed by Pedro Martínez for Americas Society. Watch the full performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIwKjvpkzN8Find out about upcoming concerts at: www.musicoftheamericas.orgOpinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members. Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Is Latin America Ready for Another Pandemic?
Apr 11 2024
Is Latin America Ready for Another Pandemic?
An old adversary of Latin America is back: Dengue. The current outbreak of the mosquito-transmitted disease is the worst in years. Across the region, from Argentina to Brazil to Puerto Rico, images of hospitals filled with patients are coming into view. Four years after the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, how well-equipped is the region to tackle this one—or those to follow? In this episode, we hear from Dr. Mariangela Simão, the head of the Brazilian Instituto Todos pela Saude and formerly of the WHO. In a conversation with AS/COA Online’s Chase Harrison, she covers the outbreak, the strengths and liabilities Latin America has in battling pandemics, and what advice she’d give Brazil’s president. Learn about AS/COA’s Healthcare Series: https://www.as-coa.org/healthcareVisit www.as-coa.org/podcast to subscribe at your preferred platform and so you don’t miss future episodes. Send us feedback at latamfocus@as-coa.org or via X at @ASCOA. The music in this podcast is performed by Bobby Sanabria and the Multiverse Big Band for Americas Society. Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.orgOpinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members.  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
What's on the Economic Agenda for Panama's Next President?
Mar 27 2024
What's on the Economic Agenda for Panama's Next President?
Panama is facing a moment of uncertainty amid an electoral race with eight candidates, droughts affecting the Panama Canal, and fallout over massive 2023 mining protests. But Felipe Chapman, chairman and managing partner of economic and financial advisory firm INDESA, remains optimistic about his country’s future. In a conversation with AS/COA Vice President Randy Melzi, he says Panama’s challenges are “fixable” as he outlines the economic agenda for the next administration.This is the third episode in our monthly series on 2024 elections in Latin America. Listen to the first episode on Nayib Bukele’s global reach and the second episode on Mexico’s youth vote. See our Panama election poll tracker at: www.as-coa.org/panama-pollsGet election coverage in our guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024Visit www.as-coa.org/podcast to subscribe at your preferred platform and so you don’t miss future episodes. Send us feedback at latamfocus@as-coa.org or via X at @ASCOA.The music in this podcast is "Cadenza con pajarillo,”  performed by Eddy Marcano & Trío Acústico for Americas Society. Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.orgOpinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members. Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Brian A. Nichols on the Biden Administration's Latin America Policy
Mar 13 2024
Brian A. Nichols on the Biden Administration's Latin America Policy
Just hours before Joe Biden’s State of the Union address, the State Department’s Assistant Secretary for the Western Hemisphere Brian A. Nichols joined AS/COA in an event covering the state of U.S. policy in the Americas. In a conversation with AS/COA Vice President Eric Farnsworth, Ambassador Nichols laid out the administration’s positions on regional quagmires, such as Haiti’s humanitarian and political crises and the fairness of Venezuela’s July elections. But he also delved into opportunities in the region like partnering on critical minerals and renewable energy with Argentina or deepening already strong economic ties with Mexico. What will Washington do if the Maduro regime doesn’t allow opposition candidate María Corina Machado to run? How will Mexico’s election affect the bilateral relationship? All this and more are covered in this episode.Watch the video of this event: https://www.as-coa.org/BrianNichols2024Visit www.as-coa.org/podcast to subscribe at your preferred platform and so you don’t miss future episodes. Send us feedback at latamfocus@as-coa.org or via X at @ASCOA.The music in this podcast is Arrecife Urbano, performed by Cuarteto de Guitarras de Costa Rica for Americas Society. Watch the performance: https://youtu.be/jUHzWiavG1o?si=0gUQiE_jmUjeNZ8g Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.orgOpinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members. Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
As Mexico’s Election Fires Up, a Look at Youth and Democracy
Feb 22 2024
As Mexico’s Election Fires Up, a Look at Youth and Democracy
In Mexico’s 2024 vote, more than a quarter of eligible voters are under 30 and nearly half are under 40. That means younger voters have an opportunity to play a major role in an election not only for president, but one that will see more than 20,000 seats up for grabs. But they have to participate if they want to have an impact. Me Veo, an organization focused on getting out the vote in this election, is seeking to do just that. Its director, Alexandra Zapata, joined the podcast to spells out ways to get Mexico’s young voters engaged. And in the opening segment, Professor Noam Lupu of Vanderbilt University’s LAPOP Lab explains the latest AmericasBarometer report, which shows Latin America’s young voters may be more committed to democracy than previously thought.  Access the 2023 AmericasBarometer report: https://www.vanderbilt.edu/lapop/ This is the second episode in our monthly series on 2024 elections in Latin America. Listen to the first episode on El Salvador’s expat votes and Nayib Bukele’s reach: http://t.ly/H0Lnd  Get more election coverage in our guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024  See our Mexico election poll tracker at: http://t.ly/NPtozVisit www.as-coa.org/podcast to subscribe at your preferred platform and so you don’t miss future episodes.Send us feedback at latamfocus@as-coa.org or via X at @ASCOA.  The music in this podcast was performed by Ernest Ranglin at Americas Society. Watch the performance: t.ly/9wmDJ  Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.org  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members.   Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
How Courts Can Make or Break Latin America's Corruption Battle
Feb 8 2024
How Courts Can Make or Break Latin America's Corruption Battle
When it comes to corruption perceptions, Latin America is stagnating. And what’s one major obstacle to improvement? Judiciary independence, explains Transparency International’s Luciana Torchiaro. In this episode, she dives deep into how the region fared in her organization’s latest Corruption Perceptions Index, released in January 2024, and tells AS/COA Online’s Luisa Leme why attempts to weaken the judiciaries in countries such as Brazil, Mexico, and Honduras are hindering the battle against corruption. But the news isn’t all bad. She explains how steps taken in the Dominican Republic serve as a model, and why Chile has an opportunity to restore its standing as a regional transparency leader.Access the Transparency International 2023 report: http://t.ly/nvrSPRead Luciana Torchiaro’s analysis on the challenges to independent judiciaries in Latin America: http://t.ly/1Q3ZWAS/COA also monitors corruption progress in Latin America. See our 2023 Capacity to Combat Corruption Index, published in partnership with Control Risks: https://www.as-coa.org/CCC2023The music in this episode is “Compay” by Ártemis Duo. Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRxcjm2Sia4 Find out about upcoming concerts at: www.musicoftheamericas.orgCheck out other episodes and subscribe to Latin America in Focus on your preferred platform via: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Online Reach and Expat Votes in El Salvador’s Election
Jan 25 2024
Online Reach and Expat Votes in El Salvador’s Election
2024 will be a big year for Latin American elections, and the first one takes place in El Salvador. Popular President Nayib Bukele is likely to win a race that showcases his regional—and global—influence. Digital Democracy Institute of the Americas’ Roberta Braga explains how Bukele’s social media strategy spreads beyond El Salvador’s borders and calls for a rethink of how online disinformation. Virginia Commonwealth University’s Michael Paarlberg delves into how that message is being received in the large Salvadoran diaspora, which is expected to vote in record numbers this year.This episode will be the first in a series exploring the year’s elections and the forces shaping them. Catch the series and learn about 2024 elections via our guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024Read our Explainer: El Salvador's 2024 Presidential and Legislative ElectionsThis podcast was produced by Executive Producer Luisa Leme with support from Jon Orbach. Carin Zissis is the host.The music in this podcast is “Receitas de Samba” by C4 Trio and  was recorded for Americas Society.Access other episodes of Latin America in Focus at: www.as-coa.org/podcast  Send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgShare and subscribe at Apple, Spotify, YouTube, or wherever you get your podcasts.Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members.  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Ten Years in, What's the Future of Mexico's Morena Party?
Dec 14 2023
Ten Years in, What's the Future of Mexico's Morena Party?
2024 doesn’t just mark Mexico’s biggest elections ever, but the tenth anniversary since Morena, the party of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, became an official party. And it now faces a test: will it build on its expanding control or find itself reined in by Mexican voters in June 2024? In this episode, long-time pollster Lorena Becerra and CIDE political scientist Javier Aparicio cover whether Morena could become a hegemonic party akin to the PRI, the challenges for López Obrador’s chosen successor Claudia Sheinbaum and the opposition’s Xóchitl Gálvez, and where Mexico sits in Latin America’s anti-incumbency arc. “Morena’s Achilles’ heel is for them to become part of the old party system at some point,” Becerra tells AS/COA Online’s Carin Zissis. “And that can happen if they don't prove to be different.”This podcast was produced by Executive Producer Luisa Leme. Carin Zissis is the host.AS/COA Online will be covering Mexico’s elections. Get regular updates at: www.as-coa.org/mexicoelects2024Check out our poll tracker at: https://www.as-coa.org/articles/poll-tracker-contenders-mexicos-2024-presidential-voteLearn about other 2024 elections in our guide at: www.as-coa.org/2024This podcast was produced by Luisa Leme. Carin Zissis is the host.The music in this podcast was recorded for Americas Society and includes: “La danza del camalote” by José Caro, https://bit.ly/3GIzaYa as well as "Cheni" and "Nostalgia" by La Bruja de Texcoco. https://bit.ly/48fEkX7 Access other episodes of Latin America in Focus at: www.as-coa.org/podcast Send us feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org Share and subscribe at Apple, Spotify, YouTube, or wherever you get your podcasts. Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members.   Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Beyond the Boom: Latin American Writing in Translation
Nov 30 2023
Beyond the Boom: Latin American Writing in Translation
Earlier this year, Latin American literature lost a champion when Edith Grossman, one of the foremost Spanish language translators, passed away. Grossman not only translated some of the region's master writers, but she advocated for her profession and for the value of reading in translation. In this episode, two acclaimed translators, Megan McDowell and Esther Allen, speak about her legacy, the titles grabbing attention in the United States, the role of women authors in a current Latin American boom, and the connection between books in translation and events in the region today.  Below is a list of authors and titles available in English mentioned in this podcast:Why Translation Matters, by Edith GrossmanThe Silentiary, by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from Spanish by Esther Allen, introduction by Juan José SaerZama, by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from Spanish by Esther AllenThe Dangers of Smoking in Bed, by Mariana Enríquez, translated from Spanish by Megan McDowellThe Words That Remain, by Stênio Gardel, translated from Portuguese by Bruna Dantas Lobato; Winner, National Book Awards 2023 for Translated LiteratureSeven Empty Houses, by Samanta Schweblin, translated from Spanish by Megan McDowell; Winner, National Book Awards 2022 for Translated LiteratureWays of Going Home, by Alejandro Zambra, translated from Spanish by Megan McDowellThe music in this episode was performed for Americas Society and includes:“Fiesta Manka,” performed by Dario Acosta Teich & Eleanor Dubinsky. https://bit.ly/3uNqRas  “Editus and "Danzón," performed by Ricardo Ramírez and Edín Solís. https://bit.ly/46CvLo4  "Isla," performed by Pascuala Ilabaca y Fauna https://bit.ly/3T5QJc2Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.org  This episode was produced by Chase Harrison and Executive Producer Luisa Leme. Carin Zissis is the host.  Learn more about and subscribe to Latin America in Focus: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members.  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Did Colombia’s Local Elections Spell Problems for Petro?
Nov 9 2023
Did Colombia’s Local Elections Spell Problems for Petro?
On October 29, Colombians voted for mayors and governors across the country, and President Gustavo Petro’s candidates fared poorly in an election that many say served as a referendum on his leadership. Sergio Guzmán, director of Colombia Risk Analysis, talks with AS/COA Online’s Jon Orbach about what we can learn from mayoral races in Bogotá and Medellín, how the overall results provide a window into the mood in Colombia, and why Washington should pay attention to the country’s domestic politics. This podcast was produced by Jon Orbach. Carin Zissis is the host. Luisa Leme is the executive producer. Learn more about this year’s Latin American elections at: www.as-coa.org/2023The music in this episode is “Gentil Montaña” performed by the Fabian Forero Trio. Watch the video: https://youtu.be/OsE9ENAq12Y?si=9B4TStMwJNPf3aK1 Find out about upcoming concerts at: www.musicoftheamericas.orgCheck out other episodes and subscribe to Latin America in Focus on your preferred platform via: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.orgOpinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its members. Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Venezuela’s Energy Sector Primes for a Thaw
Oct 26 2023
Venezuela’s Energy Sector Primes for a Thaw
October was a busy month for Venezuela. The United States eased sanctions on the country’s oil sector, the opposition and the Maduro regime sketched out an electoral roadmap, and María Corina Machado triumphed in the opposition primary. What does all this mean for the country’s energy sector? "I estimate that instead of getting half a billion dollars per month, they will be getting closer to a billion dollars per month. So, it's a very important amount of money that Maduro could use to improve his electoral chances by spending money for electoral purposes," says Francisco Monaldi, a fellow and the director of the Latin American Energy Program at Rice University’s Baker Institute. He spoke with AS/COA Venezuela Working Group Director Guillermo Zubillaga about the outlook for the sector and Venezuela's 2024 elections. This podcast was produced by Jon Orbach. Carin Zissis is the host. Luisa Leme is the executive producer.Listen to an Americas Quarterly’s interview with the White House’s Juan Gonzalez that is mentioned in the episode: t.ly/foX6fThe music in this episode is “Pasa Mi Padre” performed by Jorge Torres. Watch the video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgJUwTOsK1wFind out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.orgCheck out other episodes and subscribe to Latin America in Focus on your preferred platform via: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
Dollarization, Inflation, and Voter Frustration in Argentina
Sep 28 2023
Dollarization, Inflation, and Voter Frustration in Argentina
Argentines face a three-horse race when they vote for a president on October 22. Each contender has distinct ideas for resolving the country’s economic and security woes. One of those candidates— libertarian Congressman Javier Milei—has brought back the idea of dollarizing the country’s economy. Are voters open to the idea? In this episode, Reuters Correspondent Anna-Catherine Brigida speaks from Buenos Aires about how each candidate is pitching themselves to voters and the interplay between their supporters. “There is a break from some of the traditional parties and left-right,” she told Chase Harrison.Learn about Argentina’s 2023 vote with our election guide at: www.as-coa.org/2023  Check our Argentina poll tracker at: as-coa.org/ARGpolls    The music in this podcast was performed by Alejandro Brittes Baroque Ensemble for Americas Society. Find out about upcoming concerts at musicoftheamericas.org. Watch the performance for Americas Society. This podcast was produced by Luisa Leme. Carin Zissis is the host. Check out other episodes and subscribe to Latin America in Focus on your preferred platform via: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa
How Women Won Political Parity in Mexico—and What Comes Next
Sep 14 2023
How Women Won Political Parity in Mexico—and What Comes Next
With Mexico’s two main political alliances selecting Claudia Sheinbaum and Xóchitl Gálvez as their 2024 contenders, it’s looking likely that the country’s next president will be a woman. But already in Mexico, women hold a range of top political seats and have achieved gender parity in Congress. In this episode, Mónica Tapia talks with Carin Zissis about the history of how Mexican women carved a path to rising political representation, the role of a resurgent women’s movement, and the two women competing for the presidency. Tapia—co-founder of Aúna, an accelerator that helps women gain political roles across Mexico—also explains the next steps, saying: “What needs to happen is that women not only become governor or president, but that they really have their power.”Learn about Mexico’s elections at: www.as-coa.org/2024Find out about AS/COA’s Women’s Hemispheric Network at: www.as-coa.org/womenThe music in this episode was performed by La Bruja de Texcoco at Americas Society. Find out about upcoming concerts at: musicoftheamericas.orgThis podcast was produced by Luisa Leme. Carin Zissis is the host. Check out other episodes and subscribe to Latin America in Focus on your preferred platform via: www.as-coa.org/podcastWe’d love to hear from you. Share feedback at: latamfocus@as-coa.org  Opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Society/Council of the Americas or its membersFollow us on social media:Twitter/X: @ASCOAInstagram: @ascoaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ascoaonline/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASCOA/Threads: https://www.threads.net/@ascoa