Quillwood Podcast

Eric Garza

A podcast to help listeners learn to navigate the changing world in which we live.

QP18: Global Warming as Hyperthreat and Entangled Security, with Elizabeth Boulton
Aug 27 2022
QP18: Global Warming as Hyperthreat and Entangled Security, with Elizabeth Boulton
Dr. Elizabeth Boulton is an independent researcher who was a transport officer in the Australian Army who did tours of duty in East Timor and Iraq and who has done humanitarian work in Ghana, Nigeria, and Sudan. She and Eric talk about global warming as a hyperobject and a hyperthreat, expanding our awareness of the harm we cause, and the entangled nature of planetary, human, and state security, among other things.Outline00:00 - 02:38 — Episode introduction02:38 - 10:13 — Global warming as a hyperobject10:13 - 15:49 — Global warming as a hyperthreat15:49 - 18:52 — Expanding our awareness of the harm we cause18:52 - 27:17 — Entangled nature of planetary, human, and state security27:17 - 37:59 — Incorporation of depletion and consumption in hyperthreat narrative37:59 - 51:41 — Role of conservation in security strategy51:41 - 65:26 — Finding agency against the hyperthreat65:26 - 78:18 — Censorship of alternative security narratives78:18 - 80:55 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesDestination Safe EarthQuillwood AcademyUndaunted Study GroupHyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World, by Timothy MortonThe Nine Planetary BoundariesThe Great Simplification, with Nate Hagens (Quillwood Podcast #6)Plan E: A Grand Strategy for the Twenty-First Century Era of Entangled Security and Hyperthreats, by Elizabeth BoultonAn Introduction to Plan E: Grand Strategy for the Twenty-First Century Era of Entangled Security and Hyperthreats, by Elizabeth BoultonSupport the show
QP16: Renewable Energy and Energy Return on Invested, with David Blittersdorf
Jul 28 2022
QP16: Renewable Energy and Energy Return on Invested, with David Blittersdorf
David Blittersdorf is the President and CEO of AllEarth Renewables, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Post Carbon Institute as well as Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility. He and Eric talk about the percentage of fossil energy we can reasonably expect to replace with renewable energy, the limitations of renewable energy, energy return on energy invested, and what drew David to the renewable energy industry, among other things.Outline00:00 - 03:14 — Episode introduction03:14 - 06:48 — What percentage of fossil energy we can replace with renewables06:48 - 17:05 — Mineral limitations in large scale conversion to renewables17:05 - 20:46 — The resource peaking process, and peaking of global oil supply20:46 - 33:41 — Energy return on energy invested, and energy blindness33:41 - 42:31 — What attracted David to the renewable energy industry42:31 - 48:04 — Resistance to wind and solar generation capacity48:04 - 52:07 — Navigating today's changing world52:07 - 54:22 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesAllEarth RenewablesQuillwood AcademyReality Blind Reading GroupPeak Everything: Waking Up to the Century of Declines, by Richard HeinbergThe Energy Return on Invested of Biodiesel in Vermont, by Eric GarzaJimmy Carter's 1977 energy policy speech (YouTube)Pliocene and Eocene provide best analogs for near-future climates (K.D. Burke et al, in Proceedings for the National Academies of Sciences)Support the show
QP15: The Ethics of Harvesting Wild Food, with Arthur Haines
Jul 13 2022
QP15: The Ethics of Harvesting Wild Food, with Arthur Haines
Arthur Haines is a Maine hunting and recreation guide, forager, ancestral skills mentor, author, public speaker, and botanical researcher. In this episode he and Eric talk about the benefits of eating and gathering wild foods, how not all impacts we might have on wild plant populations are negative, practices for properly harvesting fiddleheads and wild leeks, and strategies for regulating the harvest of wild edible plants, among other things.Outline00:00 - 03:11 — Episode introduction03:11 - 07:17 — What Arthur and his family have been harvesting and eating07:17 - 17:04 — Benefits of eating and gathering wild foods17:04 - 31:11 — Interacting with wild foods, and how not all impact is negative31:11 - 34:23 — Lamenting commercial harvesting of wild foods34:23 - 52:00 — Practices for properly harvesting fiddleheads and wild leeks52:00 - 64:30 — Strategies for regulating the harvest of wild plant foods64:30 - 73:03 — Overcoming the mindset of exploitation and conquest73:03 - 76:16 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesArthur Haines' websiteQuillwood AcademyReality Blind Reading GroupIngestion of Mycobacterium vaccae decreases anxiety-related behavior and improves learning in mice (Journal of Behavioral Processes)Immerse Yourself in a Forest for Better Health (New York Department of Environmental Conservation)Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources, by M. Kat AndersonPopulation viability analysis of American Ginseng and Wild Leek harvested in stochastic environments (Journal of Conservation Biology)Support the show
QP12: Metamorphosis as a Metaphor for Collapse
May 30 2022
QP12: Metamorphosis as a Metaphor for Collapse
In this episode Eric reflects on different ways of framing and talking about collapse, using metamorphosis as a metaphor to help us make sense of collapse, choosing our metaphors for collapse wisely, and the various physical, ecological, and social forces that are driving today's changing world.Outline00:00 - 02:25 — Episode introduction02:25 - 05:56 — Different ways of framing and talking about collapse05:56 - 09:44 — Metamorphosis as a metaphor to help us make sense of collapse09:44 - 16:17 — Adaptive cycle as a model to put collapse in a broader context16:17 - 21:41 — Reckoning with our blindness to the ubiquity of change21:41 - 24:23 — Choosing our metaphors for collapse wisely24:23 - 29:48 — The role of energy, materials, and money in forcing social change29:48 - 34:26 — The role of ecological and social turbulence in forcing social change34:26 - 37:58 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesQuillwood AcademyOvershoot Reading GroupThe Great Simplification (Nate Hagens' podcast)The Long Descent: A User's Guide to the End of the Industrial Age, by John Michael GreerThe Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century, by James Howard KunstlerHow Does A Caterpillar Turn Into A Butterfly, by Ferris Jabr (Scientific American)Adaptive Cycles (Resilience Alliance website)The adaptive cycle: more than a metaphor, by Shana M. Sundstrom and Craig R. Allen (Ecological Complexity)How Civilizations Fall: A Theory of Catabolic Collapse, by John Michael GreerAnalysis: World has already passed 'peak oil', BP figures reveal (Carbon Brief)Simon Michaux: "Minerals Blindness" (The Great Simplification podcast)Joe Rogan Experience #1245 - Andrew Yang (YouTube)The Social Dilemma (trailer on YouTube)Support the show
QP10: Towards a Just Collapse, with Dr. Kate Booth and Tristan Sykes
Apr 30 2022
QP10: Towards a Just Collapse, with Dr. Kate Booth and Tristan Sykes
Dr. Kate Booth and Tristan Sykes co-founded the platform Just Collapse. In this wide-ranging episode they talk to Eric about justice and collapse as place-based phenomenon, overshoot and the Seneca effect, collapse risks in Hobart, Tasmania and Vermont, USA, collapse awareness and collapse acceptance, structural violence as collapse avoidance, and seeing overshoot ecology and justice as issues of accountability, among other things.Outline00:00 - 02:04 — Episode introduction02:04 - 04:03 — Dr. Kate Booth and Tristan Sykes introduce themselves04:03 - 07:47 — Justice and collapse as place-based phenomenon07:47 - 13:08 — What a just collapse might look like in Hobart, Tasmania13:08 - 18:30 — Overshoot and the Seneca effect18:30 - 26:34 — Collapse risks in Vermont, USA, and how some places matter more than others26:34 - 29:57 — Regions buying their way out of collapse29:57 - 34:23 — Collapse awareness, collapse acceptance, and talking collapse34:23 - 39:46 — Structural violence as collapse avoidance39:46 - 43:40 — Hope, hopelessness, and motivation43:40 - 50:20 — Managing our nervous system responses while engaging with collapse50:20 - 56:20 — Seeing overshoot ecology and justice as issues of accountability56:20 - 64:05 — How hard it is to find a path to redemption64:05 - 68:08 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesQuillwood AcademyOvershoot Reading GroupJust Collapse websiteJust Collapse on FacebookBrave Little State, on Vermont Public RadioGesturing Towards Decolonial Futures CollectiveStaying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, by Donna HarawayPost Doom, Michael Dowd's websiteGlobal Footprint CalculatorSlavery Footprint CalculatorSupport the show
QP9: From Pan To The Present, A Deep Time Journey
Apr 16 2022
QP9: From Pan To The Present, A Deep Time Journey
Host Eric Garza invites listeners on a deep time walk that explores the energetics of human evolution and human development. He begins this journey as our lineage parts ways with ancestors of today's chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), taking us through the development of stone tools, the harnessing of fire for warmth and cooking, the crafting of spears, clothing, and bows and arrows, and lastly more modern technologies designed to harness exosomatic energy sources often derived from fossil fuels.Outline00:00 - 02:59 — Episode introduction02:59 - 06:18 — Pedagogical benefits of deep time06:18 - 09:07 — Looking at human evolution and development through an energy lens09:07 - 16:52 — Early human development, stone tools, harnessing fire16:52 - 19:08 — The Great Escalation: spears, clothes, and the bow and arrow19:08 - 22:56 — Agriculture and the expansion of ecological debt22:56 - 31:05 — Modern energy innovations, and exosomatic energy31:05 - 32:03 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesQuillwood AcademyOvershoot Reading GroupOvershoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change, by William Catton Jr.Deep Time WalkWork that ReconnectsFat, Not Meat, May Have Led to Bigger Hominin Brains, by Richard Kemeny (Scientific American)Every human culture includes cooking—this is how it began, by Graham Lawton (New Scientist)The First Spears, by Zach Zorich (Archeology)The History of Clothing and Textiles (Wikipedia)Bow and Arrow Hunting, by K. Kris Hirst (Thought Co.)History of agriculture (Wikipedia)Marion King Hubbert Support the show
QP3: Looking Critically at Catastrophism, with Harlan Morehouse
Jan 17 2022
QP3: Looking Critically at Catastrophism, with Harlan Morehouse
In this episode of the Quillwood Podcast, host Eric Garza talks with Harlan Morehouse. Harlan teaches at the University of Vermont and has a keen interest in how people negotiate their futures with regard to 21st century social and environmental uncertainties. He talks with Eric about how catastrophism and apocalypticism show up in modern film and literature, how they tend to favor individualism over collectivism, and how he stays balanced while immersed in these narratives, among other things.Outline00:00 - 01:47 — Introduction01:47 - 14:19 — What intrigues Harlan and Eric about apocalypticism and catastrophism14:19 - 20:07 — Catastrophic roots of the modern environmental movement20:07 - 27:20 — Catastrophism as an opportunity for the accumulation of capital27:20 - 33:49 — Catastrophism as an object of desire for individualistic people33:49 - 39:14 — Individual versus collective survival39:14 - 52:03 — How Harlan remains well balanced in the face of his research52:03 - 63:54 — Reflecting critically on James Howard Kunstler’s writing63:54 - 64:13 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesQuillwood AcademyHarlan Morehouse’s faculty website at the University of VermontThe Population Bomb (Paul Ehrlich, Sierra Club/Ballantice Books)Silent Spring (Rachel Carson, Houghton Mifflin Company)The Great Insect Dying: Vanishing Act in Europe and North America (Jeremy Hance, Mongabay)Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor (Rob Nixon, Harvard University Press)The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (Naomi Klein, Random House)Chicago, New Orleans, and rebirth (the op-ed in which Kristen McQueary longs for Chicago’s version of Hurricane Katrina, which Harlan incorrectly attributed to Mayor Rahm Emanuel)The Road (Cormac McCarthy, Alfred A. Knopf)Learning to Die in the Anthropocene (Roy Scranton, The New York Times)Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene (Donna Haraway, Duke University Press)A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (Raj Patel & Jason Moore, University of California PressErik Swyngedouw’s website with a list of his research and writingBraiding Sweetgrass (Robin Wall Kimmerer, Milkweed Press)Zoe Todd’s website, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton CollegeSupport the show
QP2: Dancing with the Cannibal Giant, with Sherri Mitchell
Jan 2 2022
QP2: Dancing with the Cannibal Giant, with Sherri Mitchell
In this episode of the Quillwood Podcast, host Eric Garza talks with Sherri Mitchell, a Penobcsot attorney who speaks and teaches around the world on issues of indigenous rights, environmental justice, and spiritual change. She is the author of the book Sacred Instructions: Indigenous Wisdom for Living Spirit-Based Change, and talks with Eric about the Wabenaki legend of the Cannibal Giant, the connection between overconsumption and trauma, and waking up to the pervasive grief of patriarchal colonialism, among other things.Outline00:00 - 02:23 — Introduction02:23 - 07:50 — Origins of the Cannibal Giant story07:50 - 10:41 — Demonstrating the truths we see in our lives10:41 - 14:43 — Trauma and people’s susceptibility to consumerism14:43 - 20:24 — Helping people wake up to the impacts of consumerism20:24 - 25:11 — The connection between depression, anxiety and grief25:11 - 30:05 — How trauma is cumulative30:05 - 33:46 — Sherri’s approach to healing collective trauma33:46 - 39:18 — The wounds we carry from patriarchal colonialism39:18 - 48:56 — Amplifying emotional intelligence48:56 - 50:56 — Exploring our inner landscapes50:56 - 52:59 — Episode wrap-upLinks and ResourcesQuillwood AcademySacred Instructions: Indigenous Wisdom for Living Spirit-Based Change, by Sherri MitchellSacred Instructions (Sherri’s website)Columbus and Other Cannibals, by Jack D. ForbesReport: Murder and Extremism in the United States in 2018 (Anti-Defamation League)Sacred Instructions Facebook PageSupport the show