PODCAST

Let's Talk Surgery: The RCSEd Podcast

RCSEd

Let’s Talk Surgery: The RCSEd Podcast brings you the latest news from the College, providing informative, educational and entertaining content covering a range of healthcare topics and hosting a variety of expert speakers from the RCSEd membership and beyond.
FST International Series – Insight into Trainers; Professor Steven WexnerFST International Series – Insight into Trainers; Professor Phillip CarsonFST International Series – Insight into Trainers; Chris PykeCelebrating Black History Month with Miss Samantha Tross and Professor Frank ChinegwundohLet's Talk Surgery: Global Surgery 3 – An audience with Devi Shetty, Cardiac Surgeon and revolutionaryLet's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Rural episode
This episode we focus on rural surgery and meet  two somewhat unusual surgeons – people who do things a bit differently in a very unique setting.Gordon McFarlane is a Consultant Surgeon in Lerwick, Shetland Islands.  He graduated from Aberdeen University and continued training in general surgery in Aberdeen and Inverness. He worked for 9 years as a surgeon in Chogoria, Kenya, at a 300-bed rural church hospital. On returning to the UK, he spent 4 years on the West of Scotland Training Rotation in General Surgery, the last year of which was as a Rural Surgical Trainee with the North of Scotland Deanery. He was appointed to Gilbert Bain Hospital, Shetland in 2004. He is a Fellow of the College of Surgeons of East Central and Southern Africa, and a member of the Viking Surgeons Association. He maintains an interest in rural surgical training and surgery in Africa. Stuart Fergusson (@sj_fergusson) is a Rural Surgical Fellow at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary. He graduated MBChB from the University of Glasgow in 2006 and subsequently trained in colorectal and general surgery in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Following completion of training, he spent 5 months volunteering in a remote and rural Zambia mission hospital, and will spend August 2021 – August 2023 in a Rural Surgical Fellowship prior to taking up an appointment as a consultant surgeon with NHS Shetland. Stuart describes himself as unusual in that he has always aspired to work in a rural hospital. During his training he enjoyed every specialty he encountered, and is fascinated by the huge range of pathology he has experienced during his clinical work so far in Zambia and Shetland.Rural surgeons work solely within Scotland in the six rural general hospitals and perform a wide range of surgery – essentially treating anything that comes to their door or stabilising for transfer if necessary. The skill set is clearly huge, and the variety of cases can be intimidating, as well as exciting. As our guests explain, their job is to provide the best solution available in that moment; it’s about being practical rather than a perfectionist, which both find very satisfying. They are also passionate about the unique opportunity to advocate for their local communities – shaping their patients’ journey in a very personal way. And of course, a huge attraction is living in some of the most beautiful parts of the world.Rural surgery is clearly unconventional in terms of career path, and both Gordon and Stuart describe how they essentially carved out their own training programmes. Those already in the specialty have been working hard to raise its profile among general surgeons and at government level. For trainees whose interest has been piqued by today’s episode, our guests' advice is to seek out a broad range of surgical and wider life experience. In particular look into taster weeks and travelling fellowships and explore the opportunities on offer from the Viking Surgeons Association and the Royal College of Surgeons.If you would like to find out more about remote, rural and humanitarian healthcare then please have a look at RCSEd’s Faculty of Remote, Rural and Humanitarian Healthcare (FRRHH). Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and " rel="nofollow">
Oct 18 2021
44 mins
Let's Talk Surgery: Liz O’Riordan - On the other side of the Knife #1Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Paediatrics  episode
Welcome to the Paediatrics episode of the RCSEd’s Careers podcast. Our panel today are Consultant Paediatric Surgeons Christopher Driver and Robin Garrett-Cox, and our very own Sesi Hotonu, who has gone from being a host of the podcast to a guest.Christopher Driver has been a paediatric surgeon and paediatric urologist since 2000. He is currently based in the Children's Hospital in Aberdeen and is the clinical lead for the internationally regarded Scottish Paediatric Patient Safety Programme . He is a strong advocate for delivery of healthcare as close to home as possible and provides outreach services in Inverness, Dundee and Shetland. He loves the variety of paediatrics, explaining how the benefit of being a smaller specialty is that you get to do a lot of different things and describes himself as a jack of all trades, and relishes having the confidence to carry out a wide variety of procedures.Robin Garrett-Cox has been consulting at Bristol Children's Hospital for just over 13 years in paediatric surgery neurology and oncology. He spent two months working with a paediatric surgeon during his training and found it ticked all the boxes for him. He likes the practical aspect of being a surgeon and was attracted to paediatrics because of the smaller, neater surgery involved. Sesi Hotonu is a paediatric surgery registrar for NHS Education Scotland, based in Edinburgh. She is also past Scottish Clinical Leadership Fellow (RCS(Ed) for NHS Grampian. While at medical school she wanted to do obstetrics and gynaecology, in particular foetal medicine. However, during a paediatrics rotation she followed the journey of a 2-3 day old baby who was transferred to a larger centre, and it was there she ‘found her tribe’. She found the pathology interesting and loved the delicate, elegant and intricate nature of the surgery. While describing the day-to-day nature of their work, our panel share their thoughts on the unique challenges and rewards of their specialty, such as the importance of empathetic communication with patients and parents, and the emotional challenges inherent in the job.Aside from the obvious pleasure and rewards that come from working with children, our guests put forward an array of reasons to pursue a career in paediatrics – from the joy and interest in the variety of procedures; the life changing outcomes of a simple operation; to coming across something new every day. It’s also a small, supportive specialty and a real community of colleagues who are there for each other to provide help and advice.If you think paediatrics might be the specialty for you, our panel advise a strong CV with audit and research experience and an excellent working knowledge of paediatric surgery. Courses are available from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. It is a competitive specialty, but as a result, most people who get into paediatric surgery have real passion and  drive to do it and do it well.Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Oct 11 2021
1 hr 5 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Maxillofacial surgery episode
In today's episode of our careers series we focus on oral and maxillofacial surgery with a panel of Manchester-based guests.Sajid Sainuddin is a consultant maxillofacial surgeon with a special interest in oncology and reconstruction. He began his career by training to be a dentist, before joining a craniofacial centre in his home country of India. After moving to the UK, he worked in Oxford and the support he received from consultants there was pivotal in his decision to pursue maxillofacial surgery as a career. He moved to Cardiff on a 4-year graduate entry programme, however as an international student funding his own tuition fees, he continued working in Oxford and travelled between the 2 cities to study and work. Most of Sajid’s job involves operating on head and neck cancer patients, including reconstructive work, with operations taking 10-16 hours. He describes the importance of teamwork during these long procedures and the fantastic learning opportunities they provide.We also speak to Mary Coleman, an ST6 in OMFS. She completed her dental degree at Trinity College Dublin in 2007 and worked as a house officer at the Dublin Dental Hospital and in general dental practice in Ireland and Australia. She then worked in Oxford in a LAS Dental foundation job before covering maternity leave as an OMFS SpRs. She was inspired by the challenges of working in the hospital with a big team around her and the chance to learn something new every day, so she returned to Dublin to do a 3-year medical degree. Like Sajid, she commuted between there and Oxford for on-calls, as well as supplementing her income with OMFS locums in Dublin and a small amount of dental practice. After qualifying in medicine, she completed her intern year and core training in Dublin, before taking up an SpR training position in Manchester, where she still remains. Our medical student this episode is Aysha Nijamudeen. Aysha’s personal experience of maxillofacial surgery as an orthognathic surgery patient played a key part in her choice of career. She is currently in her final year at the University of Manchester, on the 3-year course specifically for dentists pursuing a career in OMFS. Prior to medical school, she obtained degrees in medical science from the University of Leeds, and dentistry from Newcastle University. She then worked in OMFS as a senior house officer at Sunderland Royal Hospital. She works part- time in OMFS to fund her studies and maintain her portfolio for a future speciality training application. Aysha is enjoying gaining experience in the various sub-specialities and learning more about the different surgical techniques and technology involved in treating OMFS patients.Pursuing a career in maxillofacial surgery is a long process which requires dedication and commitment. Our panel are passionate about the variety of sub-specialisation and learning opportunities on offer, and they emphasise the unique family feel of the specialty, which they describe as key to their continued commitment and success. Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Oct 3 2021
49 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Neurosurgery episode
Welcome back to our Surgical Crossroads series. For this episode we’re at the top of the human body – let's see what neurosurgery is all about. It's is an exciting specialty, with the human brain, for many of us, representing a frontier into the unknown. It involves high stakes surgery with cutting edge technology and fast-paced developments, requiring truly committed individuals who are willing to be flexible in terms of job opportunities. Our consultant this episode is Mr William Taylor, who was born and brought up in the West of Scotland, attended medical school at the University of Glasgow and qualified in 1984. He was appointed as a consultant neurosurgeon at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow in 1994, with an interest in spinal surgery, but has subsequently developed a subspecialty interest in skull base surgery. He has been the Scottish Neurosurgical Training Programme director, Neurosurgical National Selection lead, JCIE board chairman and is the lead for the JCFSE and JSF international exams in neurosurgery. He describes how he picked up neurosurgery somewhat by accident during his training, and was attracted to the specialty by the ability to make a straightforward diagnosis and the challenge of managing life threatening and life altering pathologies. Bill has seen significant changes in the specialty, the way training is delivered and the day-to-day job of a consultant neurosurgeon over a 35-year period.Aditaya Kumar is a post-FRCS ST7 neurosurgery trainee in Glasgow. He was born and raised in Yorkshire and attended university in Cambridge then London. His sub-speciality interests are skull base pathologies and their approaches from transcranial and endoscopic corridors. Addy also has a Master’s degree in philosophy and enjoys reading widely, making connections between neurosurgical practice and disparate fields of interest.  Sanskrithi Sravanam (@SanskrithiS) is an FY1 academic foundation doctor in clinical neurosciences at Cambridge University Hospitals. She became interested in neurosurgery after spending five weeks experiencing the specialty in Malaysia, and during her fifth-year neurology rotation, which gave her a good insight into working in the specialty in the UK. She is passionate about diversity and medical education and is the lead for the RCSEd Cambridge foundation trainee surgical society.  Neurosurgery is a competitive specialty which tends to attract driven individuals. Our panel share their tips for gaining the edge and getting those all-important points on your CV, including pursuing outside interests which show dexterity such as sports and playing a musical instrument, which have the added benefits to work-life balance and overall wellbeing.  They also point out the importance of choosing a specialty you are passionate about and enjoy if you are going to sustain a career in surgery.Contact InformationVisit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Sep 27 2021
40 mins
Let’s Talk Surgery – Patient Safety, Lifebox and WHO Surgical Checklist with Tom WeiserLet's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Orthopaedics episode
Today we are joined by two orthopaedic surgeons and one budding orthopaedic surgeon to help us explore this unique specialty.Mr Sanjay Anand is a knee surgeon with a clinical practice centred around knee and sports injuries. As has been the case with many of our guests, Sanjay was inspired to pursue a career in orthopaedics by a senior colleague early in his career. He undertook specialist training on the NW rotation, completed the BASK knee fellowship in Knee and Sports Surgery, and achieved a MSc with distinction in Orthopaedic Engineering. In addition to his clinical role, Sanjay holds an honorary senior lecturer position at both the University of Manchester and the University of Salford where he pursues a combination of basic science and mechanical research. He is also part of a group in Manchester (Orthteam) who look after amateur and professional athletes from a wide variety of sports.  Sanjay has always enjoyed teaching and training and regularly participates in national and international courses. In his day-to-day routine, he particularly enjoys the learning opportunity presented by his morning meetings with the on-call team, including trainees and junior doctors of all levels. He sees it as a chance to test their knowledge, as well as a great way of getting to know your team and your patients.Mr Haroon Rehman is the Trainee Committee Representative on the RCSEd Council and a specialty registrar (ST8) in trauma and orthopaedic surgery based at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary where he sits on the department’s clinical governance and training committees. Haroon has a special interest in patient safety, teaching and training, and is a trainee lead for NHS Grampian. He has a subspecialist interest in lower limb trauma and arthroplasty, and recently started a fellowship at Wrightington Hospital. He was attracted to a career in orthopaedics by the ability to really make a difference in patients’ lives and see your patients getting better, and he takes a great deal of job satisfaction from this.Representing medical students and junior doctors this episode is Dr Dillon Vyas, an FY1 doctor working in Paediatric Medicine at Sheffield Children's Hospital. After initially pursuing a career in neurosurgery he became interested in orthopaedics.  Dillon is committed to medical education and founded a charity with colleagues to run a revision course in neuroanatomy, the profits from which are donated to Sheffield Children's Hospital. He won a national award for his work in this area. Our guests share their passion for orthopaedics, from the varied spectrum of treatment options to the fundamental role of teamwork. The panel’s advice for trainees is to maintain your enthusiasm and demonstrate your commitment by going for the less obvious opportunities for professional development and clinical experience. Our medical student this episode leaves us with this heartening message, “do what you're interested in, do what you find interesting, exciting, and you'll end up in the right specialty at the end of it”.Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Sep 20 2021
40 mins
Expert Witness Training with Aidan Fitzgerald and Isabel LitherlandLet's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Urology episode
Welcome to the Urology episode of the Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads series. Neil Fenn is a Consultant Urologist at Morriston Hospital Swansea and Chair of the Surgical Specialty Board (SSB) in Urology at the RCSEd. He always wanted to be a surgeon, and after qualifying from the University of Wales he completed his basic surgical and urology training in South Wales. He developed his sub-specialist interest in the management of urological malignancy and its treatment during fellowships at Flinders University, Adelaide and the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.  During the last 20 years as a consultant, he has developed a minimally invasive service for patients in South West Wales including laparoscopic nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy and pyeloplasty. In co-operation with colleagues from Cardiff and Newport he is developing the first robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy service in Wales. He has enjoyed seeing the development of this type of surgery over the last 20 years with better outcomes for patients. Neil is an active trainer. He is an assigned educational and clinical supervisor to all grades of junior surgical trainee doctors. From 2007-2011 he was the program director for urological training in Wales and oversaw the introduction of a new national curriculum. He is currently involved in putting together an online modular urology curriculum and teaching aids that can be used for all medical students with the SSB in Urology. Our registrar for this episode is Kamran Hag, currently working in the northeast of England. Kamran completed his foundation year training in Derriford hospital, Plymouth where he had his first exposure to surgery and subsequently chose this as his career path. During his core training post in the Kent Surrey and Sussex deanery he undertook a four-month placement in urology and soon decided it was the specialty for him. After six more months of urology and a frantic few weeks polishing his portfolio, he was able to secure a registrar post. Kamran is currently entering his final year of training, after which he hopes to undertake a post CCT fellowship in renal cancer.  Our panel give us a comprehensive overview of urology as a specialty, including the busy nature of on-call, urology emergencies and the key role of robotics. They emphasise the importance of getting hands-on experience and explain that there are elements of urology that trainees can get involved with at a junior stage. Urology incorporates a huge spectrum of procedures and sub-specialties, “there's something for everyone”, and those working in urology are known for being supportive and friendly mentors and teachers. For trainees interested in urology there are numerous routes into the specialty to suit a variety of skillsets. You are encouraged to get involved with societies, including the British Association of Urological Surgeons, which has a medical students branch, and the SSB in urology for the Royal College of Edinburgh. Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Sep 13 2021
50 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the General Surgery episode
Welcome to the Surgical Crossroads series with hosts Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja. This episode looks at General Surgery with another fantastic panel of guests.Jane Macaskill is a consultant oncoplastic breast surgeon in NHS Tayside. She is from Scotland and completed her training in Dundee and Edinburgh. Jane decided to pursue a career in surgery after an inspiring surgical placement with an ‘old-fashioned’ general surgeon who did everything. She enjoyed the exposure to a real mix of surgery and met some inspiring patients, and from that point she was hooked. She moved into breast surgery when a job opportunity arose at the Breast Clinic in Edinburgh.Jane finds that breast surgery patients are particularly well informed about the treatments available to them and enjoys the challenge of keeping up to date with all the latest developments in her area. Jane also has an interest in global health and volunteers with the charity, Medical Aid for Palestinians, going out to the West Bank and helping surgeons there to develop their breast cancer services. Kellie Bateman is a general surgery registrar in Wales. She was drawn to general surgery during her training rotation by the supportive team, the pace of the ward rounds and the logical steps involved. After originally considering urology, she decided she liked the variety of general surgery so made the commitment to this career path last year. Kellie is currently taking a year out to be a Welsh clinical leadership fellow with Improvement Cymru, and she finds the specialty are very supportive of pursuing such other areas of interest. Kellie is is also a member of the RCSEd trainees committee and is passionate about wellbeing and improving training.Syed Zaidi is an academic foundation year one trainee with a keen interest in general surgery. He considers himself a hands-on person and has always been inclined towards a career in surgery. He describes the steep learning curve from being a medical student to taking responsibility for your patients,  but he finds this is the most rewarding part of the job. Syed describes the difficulty of choosing a specialty when all senior colleagues talk about their disciplines with such passion. He strongly recommends going to theatres, getting to know consultants and getting a feel for the different specialties. We also speak to our own ‘Let’s Talk Surgery’ host, Greg Ekatah about his pathway through general surgery to sub-specialising as a colorectal surgeon. He enjoys the breadth of the biology and patient groups and is excited by the development of robotic surgery and technological advances in the specialty. Greg gives us a really helpful overview of the training pathway to becoming a general surgeon. He heartily recommends giving general surgery a go, and says you need to experience it hands-on to understand why it is so enjoyable. The panel’s advice for trainees who are interested in a career in general surgery is to be proactive and make your own opportunities. Work hard, take your time, and enjoy the journey. Contact InformationVisit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Sep 6 2021
1 hr 3 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Cardiothoracic episode
Welcome to another special Careers episode of the Let's talk surgery podcast for the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. Today, we're speaking to some cardiothoracic surgeons: Edward Caruana (cardiothoracic trainee), Gill Hardman (cardiothoracic ST7), and Sridhar Rathinam (consultant thoracic surgeon).Sridhar Rathinam is a consultant thoracic surgeon and senior lecturer in the University Hospitals of Leicester. He is the education secretary for Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery for Great Britain and Ireland (SCTS) and chair of the Cardiothoracic Surgical specialty Board, for the RCSEd. He has a special interest in emphysema and volume production and sarcoma and is passionate about training and education. He was inspired to become a doctor as a child by his uncle, who was also a surgeon. He is passionate about performing surgery and working closely with patients through their often difficult journeys. Gill Hardman is a cardiac registrar based in Health Education England Northwest, and is currently taking three years out of programme working on her PhD in cardiothoracic transplantation. Her main interests are medical education, training, human factors, non-technical skills and psychology, especially how surgeons think and behave. Gill is a member of the RCSEd Trainees Committee and recently joined the Women in Surgery subcommittee of the Society of Cardiothoracic Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. Like Sridhar, Gill has wanted to be a surgeon since she was a child. For Gill, the beauty of cardiac surgery is in the repeated achievement of this highly skilled, complex surgery. Edward Caruana is a trainee from the Southeast Midlands nearing completion of training in thoracic surgery. He is a keen advocate for maximising training opportunities across the spectrum of practice, and has served as a member of the Regional Training Committee for Cardiothoracic Surgery at Health Education East Midlands, and on the Cardiothoracic Surgical Specialty Board at the RCSEd. Unlike our other guests he got into cardiothoracic surgery “by accident and through a little bit of luck”, following a chance meeting with an inspirational cardiac surgeon at a conference in Croatia. In this frank discussion the panel openly discuss some of the challenges of cardiothoracics, including the historic lack of diversity, its sometimes difficult relationship with other specialties, the high-powered perception of cardiothoracic surgeons and the difficulties of balancing home and work commitments. However, all of our guests share a passion for their specialty, their teams and their patients, describing their work as an integral part of their life. It’s very apparent that theirs is a vocation and their determination and dedication is inspirational.The advice from our panel to those who wish to pursue a career in cardiothoracic surgery is to start preparing early, focus on any opportunities for exposure to the specialty and reach out directly to colleagues in cardiothoracic surgery.Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Aug 30 2021
54 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Vascular episode
Welcome to another exciting instalment of our Surgical Crossroads series. Today we have some vascular surgeons joining hosts Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja to tell us all about their chosen specialty. Andy Garnham works in the Black Country and chairs the vascular board at Edinburgh. He is also the training programme director in the West Midlands. He believes that choice of specialty often comes down to opportunity, particularly in terms of who you work with and their enthusiasm for their specialty. He became a consultant vascular surgeon in 2000, and in his day-to-day practice he enjoys the combination of general medicine and surgery and the wide variety of surgical procedures. He notes the importance of the doctor-patient relationship in vascular surgery, where patients often have ongoing health issues and vascular disease in more than one area of the body. As President and Treasurer of the Rouleaux Club, the association for vascular trainees, Andy was involved in registering vascular surgery as a new specialty. He shares what a great opportunity and privilege it has been to instigate a new training programme and highlights the new techniques and changes in practice he has seen during his 20-year career.Lauren Shelmerdine is a vascular registrar in Newcastle who is currently taking some time out of training to do research. Lauren knew from the start of medical school that she wanted to do surgery, and used the opportunity of SSCs to try out different specialties, before deciding that vascular surgery was the one for her. She likes the fact it is one of the newer specialties, and the support and enthusiasm of her vascular colleagues played a large part in her decision. Like Andy, she enjoys getting to know her patients and working with them over a long period of time. Tricia Tay is a final year medical student in the Northwest about to start her academic foundation training. Once again, she has been inspired to explore vascular surgery as a career by those she has come into contact with during her training, notably a supportive supervisor and an inspirational registrar. She attended the ‘So You Want to be a Vascular Surgeon’ course at the RCSEd and enjoyed the well-organized hands-on sessions.Andy and Lauren’s tips for getting that first vascular post include: building your portfolio early, looking over the vascular specialty portfolio checklist, joining the college and attending vascular-specific courses and joining the Rouleaux Club, which has great free resources such as webinars and podcasts. In particular they advise attending the upcoming VSASM conference (VSASM 2021 - Vascular Society) which has an essay prize of free entry for students and foundation doctors.As a vascular surgeon you need good hand-eye coordination, a bit of courage, quick thinking and the ability to stay calm under pressure. “Be brave, be courageous, ask questions, be curious. Join the vascular fold.” Contact InformationVisit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Aug 23 2021
49 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the Plastic Surgery episode
Welcome to another episode of our Surgical Crossroads series with hosts Gregory Ekatah and Sadie Khwaja. Today we explore a career in plastic surgery. Jeremy Rodriguez is a consultant plastic surgeon at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Buckinghamshire and an Associate Professor at Warwick Clinical Trials Unit. He describes how he “stumbled across” plastics as a specialty and is fascinated by the diversity and complexity of procedures. During his training he travelled and worked extensively, which enriched and challenged his clinical practice. His role is split between clinical work and his research on psychometrics: improving and using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). He reflects on the potential for conflict between these two roles and stresses the importance of having a system in place in order to deliver on research commitments.  Sarah Chadwick is a plastics specialty trainee in the North West deanery. She trained at Sheffield University School of Medicine and qualified in 2004. She originally wanted to be a paediatric surgeon, but preferred the variety of plastics and having the option to treat patients from ‘cradle to grave’. Sarah took a slightly longer training pathway after taking time out to have children and undertake a PhD, however she has found plastics as a specialty to be flexible and supportive of less than full time training. Sarah is hoping to complete her training towards the end of 2022 and is currently applying for fellowships. She is interested in pursuing a career in microsurgery, particularly breast and lower limb reconstruction.  Our medical student is Sakiinah Mungroo, a recent graduate from the University of Manchester. She is originally from Mauritius and came to the UK to study Medicine on a full scholarship. Her passion for plastic surgery stemmed from her own personal experiences; in 2013, she had severe burn injuries that required grafting. This inspired her to undertake a career in that specialty, with a particular interest in burns care, to make a difference in the lives of burns patients. Sakina is an active junior member of BAPRAS and attends the conferences every year. She has also presented at national and international conferences and founded the Plastic Surgery Society at the University of Manchester.  She will be starting her foundation year training at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital.  Plastics is a particularly competitive specialty so taking a similar approach to Sakina is recommended to boost your CV. You can find a wealth of trainee resources by joining the Plastic Surgery Trainees Association (PLASTA), https://www.plasta.org Our guests all display the typical characteristics of successful plastic surgeons – tenacity, resilience, motivation and enthusiasm. They also highlight the diverse thinking that is key in a field that often has new bespoke problems and patients that need bespoke solutions. Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member. Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes. This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Aug 16 2021
50 mins
Let's Talk Surgery Podcast, Surgical Crossroads: Choosing your specialty - the ENT episode
We begin our new series focusing on careers and career aspirations with co-host, Sadie Khwaja’s own specialty, Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery. Our guests are Consultant Otolaryngologist Emma Stapleton, ENT Registrar Todd Kanzara and medical student Eman Hasan.  Emma Stapleton is a Consultant Otolaryngologist at Manchester Royal Infirmary where she is also Clinical Lead for the Manchester Cochlear Implant Programme and academic and educational supervisor for Foundation and ENT Trainees.  Among her many other roles within surgery and ENT, she is Regional Surgical Adviser for RCSEd, Honorary Secretary of the North of England Otolaryngology Society and Vice President of WENTS . She is is married with two sons.  Emma tells us what led her to choose ENT as a specialty and the importance of selecting a specialty which fits with your lifestyle. She highlights the pleasure of transitioning through one’s career to becoming a consultant - embracing challenges and having the freedom to pursue further interests within your specialty. Emma also shares her positive view on being a woman, a mother and a surgeon, pointing out the flexibility within the infrastructure of work and training in the NHS.  Todd Kanzara is a final year Otolaryngology Specialty Trainee with a special interest in laryngology, thyroid and parathyroid  surgery. He has recently been appointed as a Consultant ENT surgeon at the Countess of Chester Hospital. Todd tells us how he switched from a career in law to medicine, after realising he wanted a profession with a real sense of purpose where he could help others. As a fifth-year medical student he had committed to becoming a urologist, but a chance meeting with an ENT surgeon while volunteering in a soup kitchen led him to consider ENT.Our medical student this episode is Eman Hasan, in the fifth year of her medicine degree at the University of Liverpool. She became interested in ENT following a week’s work experience, after which she became actively involved in ENT trainee events and completed an eight-week placement with the ENT Department at Aintree Hospital in Liverpool. She is attracted to the specialty by how friendly and welcoming those working in ENT are. Our consultant and registrar discuss the key steps towards a career in ENT, emphasising that gaining recognition by being brave and putting yourself out there as a medical student will almost certainly benefit your future career. We look at what makes a good ENT surgeon, including communication skills with patients and the broad nature of the specialty, meaning you can find your own niche. We talk about life outside of ENT surgery and how our guests find ways of linking their profession to the issues that matter to them. Lastly we look to the future and embracing technology to enable collaborative working.  The take home message from this episode’s medical student is the importance of reinforcing equality and diversity in your future career, and speaking up when you can. Contact InformationVisit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khwaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Aug 9 2021
56 mins
Introducing Surgical Crossroads: Choosing Your Specialty - the careers series from the Let's Talk Surgery podcast
The Let's Talk Surgery podcast from the Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh (RCSEd) introduces a new surgical career's series, 'Surgical Crossroads: Choosing Your Specialty'.  In this series, podcast hosts Greg Ekatah and Sesi Hotonu are joined by ENT surgeon Sadie Khwaja, bringing the Health Education England North West Career's Fair, which traditionally takes place each November, to a broader audience via the podcast platform. With 11 episodes, this podcast series focuses on careers and career aspirations. We'll be talking about how to choose the career you want in surgery and giving you a flavour of our guests' chosen specialty, as well as hints, tips and advice from those established in their career to their colleagues who are just beginning to find their career pathways.In each episode, we will look at a different specialty and speak with three guests at different stages in their career path – a consultant, a registrar and a medical student. We wish to thank our guests for giving an amazing insight into their career journey - who and what inspired them, and the real reasons behind their choice of speciality. By sharing their story so openly we are given a very real and honest impression of the day to day lives of our guests. This series will enlighten, inspire and inform. For those who know what speciality they wish to choose, this may solidify your choice, while for those still considering their options, the stories of our guests cannot fail to inspire you. You will also be amazed at how many of our guests are working in a different specialty to the one they thought they would be! Sit back and enjoy the breadth of experience captured within this podcast series. Contact Information Visit https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/ for further information and details on becoming a member.Email: comms@rcsed.ac.uk for any questions or topic suggestions you may have for future episodes.This show is brought to you by the RCSEd. Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram. Hosted by Greg Ekatah, Sesi Hotonu and Sadie Khawaja produced and directed by Heather Pownall of Heather's Media Hub Ltd.
Aug 4 2021
14 mins

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