PodcastDX

PodcastDX

PodcastDX is an interview based podcast series in a “peer-to-peer supportive format." We have found that many people are looking for a platform, a way to share their voice and the story that their health journey has created. Each one is unique since even with the same diagnosis, symptoms and the way each person will react to a diagnosis, is different. Sharing what they have experienced and overcome is a powerful way our guests can teach others with similar ailments. Many of our guests are engaging in self-advocacy while navigating a health condition, many are complex and without a road-map to guide them along their journey they have developed their own. Sharing stories may help others avoid delays in diagnosis or treatment or just give hope to others that are listening. Sharing is empowering and has a healing quality of its own. Our podcast provides tips, hints, and support for common healthcare conditions. Our guests and our listeners are just like you- navigating the complex medical world. We hope to ease some tension we all face when confronted with a new diagnosis. We encourage anyone wanting to share their story with our listeners to email us at PodcastDX@yahoo.com . ​

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Monkeypox part 2 with Dr Tiffany
3d ago
Monkeypox part 2 with Dr Tiffany
This week we will discuss Monkeypox with Dr. Tiffany Najberg.  Dr. Tiffany Alexis Najberg Pronouns: She/her Physician licensed in the state of Louisiana Dr. Tiffany is a Board Certified Emergency Physician who has served in busy emergency departments and provided prehospital care as well as remote care since 2007. A transwoman currently transitioning herself, she is the first open trans woman Emergency Physician in Louisiana. She is a business owner who co owns her clinic, UrgentEMS, in Shreveport Louisiana. She practices urgent care, some primary care, and gender affirming care there and via telehealth throughout the state. Her experience in remote medical direction led her to begin practicing transgender medicine via telemedicine, as making it accessible to all, even in isolated locations, is something she cares deeply about. She received her medical degree at the University of North Texas in Fort Worth, completed her emergency medicine residency at LSU New Orleans (Charity Hospital), and her EMS fellowship with New Orleans EMS. She has been a teaching staff at Ochsner in New Orleans and St. Francis in Monroe, and has a passion for medical education. She still actively instructs medical students at her clinic. Her non medical interests include amateur storm chasing, writing, all things social, and she is a fierce advocate for public health, trans rights, women’s rights, and lgbtq+ issues through her sizable online platforms. Dr. Tiffany goes more in depth about this new form of pox quickly spreading around the world.   Symptoms of monkeypox can include Fever Headache Muscle aches and backache Swollen lymph nodes Chills Exhaustion Respiratory symptoms (e.g. sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough) A rash that may be located on or near the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) but could also be on other areas like the hands, feet, chest, face, or mouth. The rash will go through several stages, including scabs, before healing. The rash can look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy.   You may experience all or only a few symptoms Sometimes, people get a rash first, followed by other symptoms. Others only experience a rash. Most people with monkeypox will get a rash. Some people have developed a rash before (or without) other symptoms. ​ Monkeypox symptoms usually start within 3 weeks of exposure to the virus. If someone has flu-like symptoms, they will usually develop a rash 1-4 days later. Monkeypox can be spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has healed, all scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. If You Have a New or Unexplained Rash or Other Symptoms... Avoid close contact, including sex or being intimate with anyone, until you have been checked out by a healthcare provider. If you don’t have a provider or health insurance, visit a public health clinic near you. When you see a healthcare provider, wear a mask, and remind them that this virus is circulating in the area. Monkeypox spreads in a few ways. Monkeypox can spread to anyone through close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact, including: Direct contact with monkeypox rash, scabs, or body fluids from a person with monkeypox. Touching objects, fabrics (clothing, bedding, or towels), and surfaces that have been used by someone with monkeypox. Contact with respiratory secretions. This direct contact can happen during intimate contact, including: Oral, anal, and vaginal sex or touching the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) of a person with monkeypox. Hugging, massage, and kissing. Prolonged face-to-face contact. Touching fabrics and objects during sex that were used by a person with monkeypox and that have not been disinfected, such as bedding, towels, fetish gear, and sex toys. A pregnant person can spread the virus to their fetus through the placenta. It’s also possible for people to get monkeypox from infected animals, either by being scratched or bitten by the animal or by preparing or eating meat or using products from an infected animal. A person with monkeypox can spread it to others from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. ​Scientists are still researching: If the virus can be spread when someone has no symptoms How often monkeypox is spread through respiratory secretions, or when a person with monkeypox symptoms might be more likely to spread the virus through respiratory secretions. Whether monkeypox can be spread through semen, vaginal fluids, urine, or feces. ​Protect Yourself and Others Following the recommended prevention steps and getting vaccinated if you were exposed to monkeypox or are at higher risk of being exposed to monkeypox can help protect you and your community. Take the following steps to prevent getting monkeypox: Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox. Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox. Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone with monkeypox. Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used. Do not share eating utensils or cups with a person with monkeypox. Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of a person with monkeypox. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom. ​In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread monkeypox virus, usually rodents and primates. Also, avoid sick or dead animals, as well as bedding or other materials they have touched. CDC recommends vaccination for people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who may be more likely to get monkeypox. ​People more likely to get monkeypox include: People who have been identified by public health officials as a contact of someone with monkeypox People who are aware that one of their sexual partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with monkeypox People who had multiple sexual partners in the past 2 weeks in an area with known monkeypox People whose jobs may expose them to orthopoxviruses, such as: Laboratory workers who perform testing for orthopoxviruses Laboratory workers who handle cultures or animals with orthopoxviruses Some designated healthcare or public health workers Treatment There are no treatments specifically for monkeypox virus infections. However, monkeypox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, which means that antiviral drugs and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox may be used to prevent and treat monkeypox virus infections. Antivirals, such as tecovirimat (TPOXX), may be recommended for people who are more likely to get severely ill, like patients with weakened immune systems. If you have symptoms of monkeypox, you should talk to your healthcare provider, even if you don’t think you had contact with someone who has monkeypox. ​(Credits: CDC)
Monkeypox part 2 with Dr Tiffany
3d ago
Monkeypox part 2 with Dr Tiffany
This week we will discuss Monkeypox with Dr. Tiffany Najberg.  Dr. Tiffany Alexis Najberg Pronouns: She/her Physician licensed in the state of Louisiana Dr. Tiffany is a Board Certified Emergency Physician who has served in busy emergency departments and provided prehospital care as well as remote care since 2007. A transwoman currently transitioning herself, she is the first open trans woman Emergency Physician in Louisiana. She is a business owner who co owns her clinic, UrgentEMS, in Shreveport Louisiana. She practices urgent care, some primary care, and gender affirming care there and via telehealth throughout the state. Her experience in remote medical direction led her to begin practicing transgender medicine via telemedicine, as making it accessible to all, even in isolated locations, is something she cares deeply about. She received her medical degree at the University of North Texas in Fort Worth, completed her emergency medicine residency at LSU New Orleans (Charity Hospital), and her EMS fellowship with New Orleans EMS. She has been a teaching staff at Ochsner in New Orleans and St. Francis in Monroe, and has a passion for medical education. She still actively instructs medical students at her clinic. Her non medical interests include amateur storm chasing, writing, all things social, and she is a fierce advocate for public health, trans rights, women’s rights, and lgbtq+ issues through her sizable online platforms. Dr. Tiffany goes more in depth about this new form of pox quickly spreading around the world.   Symptoms of monkeypox can include Fever Headache Muscle aches and backache Swollen lymph nodes Chills Exhaustion Respiratory symptoms (e.g. sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough) A rash that may be located on or near the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) but could also be on other areas like the hands, feet, chest, face, or mouth. The rash will go through several stages, including scabs, before healing. The rash can look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy.   You may experience all or only a few symptoms Sometimes, people get a rash first, followed by other symptoms. Others only experience a rash. Most people with monkeypox will get a rash. Some people have developed a rash before (or without) other symptoms. ​ Monkeypox symptoms usually start within 3 weeks of exposure to the virus. If someone has flu-like symptoms, they will usually develop a rash 1-4 days later. Monkeypox can be spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has healed, all scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. If You Have a New or Unexplained Rash or Other Symptoms... Avoid close contact, including sex or being intimate with anyone, until you have been checked out by a healthcare provider. If you don’t have a provider or health insurance, visit a public health clinic near you. When you see a healthcare provider, wear a mask, and remind them that this virus is circulating in the area. Monkeypox spreads in a few ways. Monkeypox can spread to anyone through close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact, including: Direct contact with monkeypox rash, scabs, or body fluids from a person with monkeypox. Touching objects, fabrics (clothing, bedding, or towels), and surfaces that have been used by someone with monkeypox. Contact with respiratory secretions. This direct contact can happen during intimate contact, including: Oral, anal, and vaginal sex or touching the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) of a person with monkeypox. Hugging, massage, and kissing. Prolonged face-to-face contact. Touching fabrics and objects during sex that were used by a person with monkeypox and that have not been disinfected, such as bedding, towels, fetish gear, and sex toys. A pregnant person can spread the virus to their fetus through the placenta. It’s also possible for people to get monkeypox from infected animals, either by being scratched or bitten by the animal or by preparing or eating meat or using products from an infected animal. A person with monkeypox can spread it to others from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. ​Scientists are still researching: If the virus can be spread when someone has no symptoms How often monkeypox is spread through respiratory secretions, or when a person with monkeypox symptoms might be more likely to spread the virus through respiratory secretions. Whether monkeypox can be spread through semen, vaginal fluids, urine, or feces. ​Protect Yourself and Others Following the recommended prevention steps and getting vaccinated if you were exposed to monkeypox or are at higher risk of being exposed to monkeypox can help protect you and your community. Take the following steps to prevent getting monkeypox: Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox. Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox. Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone with monkeypox. Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used. Do not share eating utensils or cups with a person with monkeypox. Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of a person with monkeypox. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom. ​In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread monkeypox virus, usually rodents and primates. Also, avoid sick or dead animals, as well as bedding or other materials they have touched. CDC recommends vaccination for people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who may be more likely to get monkeypox. ​People more likely to get monkeypox include: People who have been identified by public health officials as a contact of someone with monkeypox People who are aware that one of their sexual partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with monkeypox People who had multiple sexual partners in the past 2 weeks in an area with known monkeypox People whose jobs may expose them to orthopoxviruses, such as: Laboratory workers who perform testing for orthopoxviruses Laboratory workers who handle cultures or animals with orthopoxviruses Some designated healthcare or public health workers Treatment There are no treatments specifically for monkeypox virus infections. However, monkeypox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, which means that antiviral drugs and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox may be used to prevent and treat monkeypox virus infections. Antivirals, such as tecovirimat (TPOXX), may be recommended for people who are more likely to get severely ill, like patients with weakened immune systems. If you have symptoms of monkeypox, you should talk to your healthcare provider, even if you don’t think you had contact with someone who has monkeypox. ​(Credits: CDC)
Monkeypox Part 1
Aug 2 2022
Monkeypox Part 1
This week we will discuss the basics about Monkeypox.  We will have Dr. Tiffany Najberg on the show in two weeks to go more in depth about this new form of pox quickly spreading around the world.     Symptoms of monkeypox can include: FeverHeadacheMuscle aches and backacheSwollen lymph nodesChillsExhaustionRespiratory symptoms (e.g. sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough)A rash that may be located on or near the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) but could also be on other areas like the hands, feet, chest, face, or mouth. The rash will go through several stages, including scabs, before healing.The rash can look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy.   You may experience all or only a few symptoms Sometimes, people get a rash first, followed by other symptoms. Others only experience a rash.Most people with monkeypox will get a rash.Some people have developed a rash before (or without) other symptoms. Monkeypox symptoms usually start within 3 weeks of exposure to the virus. If someone has flu-like symptoms, they will usually develop a rash 1-4 days later. Monkeypox can be spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has healed, all scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks.   If You Have a New or Unexplained Rash or Other Symptoms... Avoid close contact, including sex or being intimate with anyone, until you have been checked out by a healthcare provider.If you don’t have a provider or health insurance, visit a public health clinic near you.When you see a healthcare provider, wear a mask, and remind them that this virus is circulating in the area. Monkeypox spreads in a few ways. Monkeypox can spread to anyone through close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact, including: Direct contact with monkeypox rash, scabs, or body fluids from a person with monkeypox.Touching objects, fabrics (clothing, bedding, or towels), and surfaces that have been used by someone with monkeypox.Contact with respiratory secretions. This direct contact can happen during intimate contact, including: Oral, anal, and vaginal sex or touching the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus (butthole) of a person with monkeypox.Hugging, massage, and kissing.Prolonged face-to-face contact.Touching fabrics and objects during sex that were used by a person with monkeypox and that have not been disinfected, such as bedding, towels, fetish gear, and sex toys. A pregnant person can spread the virus to their fetus through the placenta. It’s also possible for people to get monkeypox from infected animals, either by being scratched or bitten by the animal or by preparing or eating meat or using products from an infected animal. A person with monkeypox can spread it to others from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. Scientists are still researching: If the virus can be spread when someone has no symptomsHow often monkeypox is spread through respiratory secretions, or when a person with monkeypox symptoms might be more likely to spread the virus through respiratory secretions.Whether monkeypox can be spread through semen, vaginal fluids, urine, or feces. Protect Yourself and Others Following the recommended prevention steps and getting vaccinated if you were exposed to monkeypox or are at higher risk of being exposed to monkeypox can help protect you and your community. Take the following steps to prevent getting monkeypox: Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox. Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone with monkeypox. Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used. Do not share eating utensils or cups with a person with monkeypox.Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of a person with monkeypox. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom. In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread monkeypox virus, usually rodents and primates. Also, avoid sick or dead animals, as well as bedding or other materials they have touched. CDC recommends vaccination for people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who may be more likely to get monkeypox. People more likely to get monkeypox include: People who have been identified by public health officials as a contact of someone with monkeypoxPeople who are aware that one of their sexual partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with monkeypoxPeople who had multiple sexual partners in the past 2 weeks in an area with known monkeypox People whose jobs may expose them to orthopoxviruses, such as: Laboratory workers who perform testing for orthopoxvirusesLaboratory workers who handle cultures or animals with orthopoxvirusesSome designated healthcare or public health workers Treatment There are no treatments specifically for monkeypox virus infections. However, monkeypox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, which means that antiviral drugs and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox may be used to prevent and treat monkeypox virus infections. Antivirals, such as tecovirimat (TPOXX), may be recommended for people who are more likely to get severely ill, like patients with weakened immune systems. If you have symptoms of monkeypox, you should talk to your healthcare provider, even if you don’t think you had contact with someone who has monkeypox. (Credits: CDC)
Magic Mushrooms Treating Depression
Jun 28 2022
Magic Mushrooms Treating Depression
In this episode we will discuss "Magic Mushrooms" with our guest, Del Jolly.   ​Del Jolly, Co-Founder of Umbo, Unlimited Sciences and expert in functional mushrooms, states the research at Unlimited Sciences collects real-world data on psychedelic use so that we can more quickly understand how to use these drugs safely and effectively for our health and overall wellbeing.  Advocate & Educator. Focused on shifting the cultural narrative, Del worked as part of Decriminalize Denver and Charlotte’s Web CBD before co-founding Unlimited Sciences, a psychedelic research nonprofit partnered with the likes of Johns Hopkins University. He believes functional mushrooms have just as much, if not more, potential than psychedelics and is committed to exploring and unearthing everything we can. “With a focus on mental health becoming an important topic, the ways in which we address these issues are changing. Decriminalizing psychedelics, before legalization, is the most equitable solution we currently have under our system. And allowing humans to take their health and well-being into their own hands, without the fear of criminal repercussions isn't only the right thing to do, but the moral thing. Decriminalization and then the legalization of psychedelics is long overdue,” says Jolly. ​Magic mushrooms are wild or cultivated mushrooms that contain psilocybin, a naturally-occurring psychoactive and hallucinogenic compound. Psilocybin is considered one of the most well-known psychedelics, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administrations (SAMHSA).1 Psilocybin is classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning that it has a high potential for misuse and has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. (Credits: Verywell Health)
Crohn's and Gastroparesis With Anna
May 10 2022
Crohn's and Gastroparesis With Anna
This week we are talking once again with Anna, this time about Crohn's Disease and Gastroparesis.  Anna is a 35 year old female who has an independent spirit inside of a body that holds an alphabet of health conditions. Anna worked as a case manager for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities where she loved to advocate for her clients. When her health forced her to take a step back from working things have been rough as she looks for a new way to advocate for herself and for others. She has struggled with different health issues most of her life but the battle that lead to her to become disabled started in July of 2018. Currently she has been diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Gastroparesis, POTS, MS, Addisons, Crohn's, Hypoglycemia, MCAS, TPN dependent, Failure to thrive and more.  Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It causes inflammation of your digestive tract, which can lead to abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition. Inflammation caused by Crohn's disease can involve different areas of the digestive tract in different people. This inflammation often spreads into the deeper layers of the bowel. Crohn's disease can be both painful and debilitating, and sometimes may lead to life-threatening complications. While there's no known cure for Crohn's disease, therapies can greatly reduce its signs and symptoms and even bring about long-term remission and healing of inflammation. With treatment, many people with Crohn's disease are able to function well (CREDITS: Mayo Clinic).   Gastroparesis is a chronic disorder which means delayed stomach emptying without a blockage. In healthy people, when the stomach is functioning normally, contractions of the stomach help to crush ingested food and then propel the pulverized food into the small intestine where further digestion and absorption of nutrients occurs. (CREDITS: Am. College of Gastroenterology)