Hygiene & infection prevention network

Dr. Marco Bo Hansen

The global effort of the Hygiene & infection prevention network links clinical expertise and resources, aiding hygiene improvement efforts in your healthcare communities. The podcast provides cutting-edge research conducted with integrity as a way to reduce infections worldwide.

Kelly Schmidtke on behavioural activation for positive change (United Kingdom)
Mar 15 2022
Kelly Schmidtke on behavioural activation for positive change (United Kingdom)
On the episode is Kelly Schmidtke.Dr. Kelly Schmidtke is a psychologist and a PhD in experimental psychology. She is currently an assistant professor at Warwick Medical School in England. She is the author of several book chapters and research papers. On decision making"Our brain doesn't make decisions, we make decisions, as people. And we have to own our decisions, not cast them off to our brain did all the hard work for us [...] You're the holistic thing."On population behaviour"My research drifts more towards population problems, how can we influence population behaviour to drift one direction we deem desirable and stop drifting the other direction we deem undesirable."On MINDSPACE"MINDSPACE is an acronym used to describe nine different ways you can nudge people: 1) Messenger, 2) Incentives, 3) Norms, 4) default, 5) salience, 6) priming, 7) Affects, 8) Commitments, 9) Ego these are nine different tools.On nudging"A nudge isn't an aspect of our choice environment that exists out there and influences us one way or another. I think a nudge has to be intentionally put there to drift your behaviour in one way or another" "Fun nudges: "small plates are often recommended to people who try to lose weight. These can work on two levels. 1) perception - visually triggering your mind, 2) practical - you can only get the amount of food (that can be) on the small plate unless you stand up again and refill the plate. This is an example of nudging as long as you're in control of the amount of food. Remember, nudges are supposed to be about your free choice." "My favourite example of a nudge is like Shore Drive, which is a road in Chicago that has BIG turns that people often miss if they don't pay attention. [...] When you drive, you use the lines as an indicator for how fast you drive, so what they did was shorten the lines, so people would think they drove faster when approaching a turn. Now perceptually, as you drive, it looks for you like you're driving faster, and you'd hit the brakes and drive the appropriate speed through the turn."
Cindie Maagaard on narrative medicine to improve clinical outcomes (Denmark)
Dec 30 2021
Cindie Maagaard on narrative medicine to improve clinical outcomes (Denmark)
On the podcast is Cindie MaagaardToday's guest is Dr. Cindie Maagaard, an associate professor at the Department of Language and Communication at the University of Southern Denmark. She holds a Ph.D. in postmodern English literature. Since 2010, her passion for narratives has turned to investigate organizational communication. Since 2016 her research has increasingly focused on how narratives are used in contexts of health and medicine to help health professionals and patients understand and communicate about illness - and she is one of the leading experts in the field. Cindie has published research articles and book chapters on narrative medicine and is the co-editor of a brand new anthology of Danish and international literature written by and about patients and doctors. On narrative medicineA starting point for narrative medicine is that any medical perspective includes a patient's life experiences and relationships, worries, hopes, desires, and more. These perspectives are integrated into a medical perspective. On communicating more empathetically through narrativesGive the patient time in the beginning to talk, maybe beginning with a question. Tell me what I need to know about your situation and why you are here? And give the patient time to unfold that. Practice attention by reading.  Show notes: Recommendations from CindieThe Principles and Practice of Narrative MedicineThe Wounded StorytellerIllness as Metaphor and AIDS and its Metaphors
Seven Aghdassi on promoting novel approaches in infection prevention (Germany)
Nov 16 2021
Seven Aghdassi on promoting novel approaches in infection prevention (Germany)
On the podcast is Seven Aghdassi. Seven works at the Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine at the recognized Charité University Hospital in Berlin. Seven has a particular interest and specialized knowledge in automated cluster detection and automated surveillance systems. He has worked with the World Health Organization to develop the Infection Prevention and Control Assessment Framework (IPACF). Additionally, Seven recently won 3rd place in the German award for patient safety for the cluster detection system “CLAR” alongside his colleagues from Charité. He participates in the Charité Digital Clinician Scientist Program funded by the DFG, Charité, and the Berlin Institute of Health.On digitalization"The ultimate goal with the automation and digitalization should be to spend less time in front of a computer and more time doing actual patient care."On surveillance"Automated surveillance is certainly a target for optimization." On infection control"Good advice in life in general but specifically in healthcare and infection control is to be resilient and to see problems as not only problems but as the first step towards a solution."Seven Aghdassi on ResearchGate Affiliations1) Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Berlin, Germany2) National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, Berlin, Germany3) Berlin Institute of Health at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, BIH Biomedical Innovation Academy, BIH Charité Digital Clinician Scientist Program, Berlin, Germany
Brett Mitchell on the price of patient safety (Australia)
Oct 13 2021
Brett Mitchell on the price of patient safety (Australia)
On the podcast is Brett Mitchell. Brett is a professor of nursing at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He is an internationally recognized researcher in the field of infection prevention and control. Professor Mitchell has extensive clinical experience and strong academic skills with 150 peer-reviewed publications and oral conference presentations. He has authored several books and has been a speaker at numerous conferences in Australia and internationally. Brett is also Editor-in-Chief of the international peer-reviewed journal called Infection, Disease, and Health. In this episode, you will learn about the newest research in the area, the price of patient safety, and how you can work with the industry for impact. This is an episode you don’t want to miss. On  infection prevention“What we found in the point-prevalence study is that essentially 1 in 10 people in hospitals had an infection acquired in hospital.”“For many things in infection-prevention control, the guidelines were generally relying on poor evidence.”On the price of patient safety“You can turn the study around and say that it is cost-effective to invest in improving the routine cleaning of hospitals because the investment is worth it in terms of reduction in infections and things like the length of stay.”On working with industry for impact“Ultimately, if we continually invest in one area, it is to the detriment of others. We need to be careful to invest in the right things – in this case, prevention of hospital-acquired infections – but we don’t want to invest in things that won’t be effective in the future. Therefore, we must look into things like cost-effectiveness to allow decision-makers to make reasonable decisions.”On the single most crucial advice for improving patient safety“Follow the data, follow the evidence.”
Seif Salem Al-Abri on a proficient commitment to disease surveillance and control (Oman)
Jul 19 2021
Seif Salem Al-Abri on a proficient commitment to disease surveillance and control (Oman)
On the podcast is Dr. Seif Salem Al-Abri, the Director-General for Disease Surveillance and Control at the Ministry of Health of Oman. Seif is a practicing consultant in Infectious Diseases at the Royal hospital of Oman, and he has been the head of the infectious diseases department and head of medicine.He has done his training at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. He is an accredited Royal College of Physicians educator, an international advisor for the Royal College of Physicians of London, and a member of the Governing Council of the National University for Science and technology. Finally, he is an associate editor to Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal, Journal of Infection and Public Health, and Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials.A few key takeaways: On overcoming Antimicrobial ResistanceWe know what should be done; unfortunately, still, to this day,  I  get calls from hospitals, from colleagues. They think it's a business of the infection, professional control. And the infectious diseases or microbiology, it's not. It’s the business of everybody. It starts from the decision-makers, down to the community, down to the general population, because they will go to, they will go to a health center insisting on antibiotics. On getting publishedResearch and published papers are one of the best career investments and boosters, career posters, so do your best to study and write.On changes in Healthcare-Associated Infections over timeI think it's too soon to find this because you need to measure it if you want to manage it.