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ANGLOPOD

Hi, I'm Dan, your English teacher online and ANGLOPOD is a podcast and a website for improving your English. Just choose what you want to practise, listen to the lessons and do the quizzes at ANGLOPOD.COM to help you learn. Want to learn more? Become a member of ANGLOPOD+ to stream hours of English video lessons whenever and wherever you want.

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Verbs that are never continuous
6d ago
Verbs that are never continuous
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to continue to learn about English tenses by taking a look at verbs in English that are never, or hardly ever, used in the continuous form.In the previous lesson, we learnt about the difference between the present simple and continuous tense and how the meaning can change when the form of the verb changes. However, there are some verbs that we just don’t use in the continuous form. For example, you say: “I LIKE these shoes”. You don’t say: “I AM LIKING these shoes”. That just sounds very strange.These verbs normally refer to how we feel, what we like and what we believe. Here are a few more examples. You would say: “I LIKE these shoes. They FIT me really well. But I KNOW I can’t afford them because they COST too much!” All these verbs are in the present simple. They would sound very strange in the continuous form, so you couldn’t say ‘liking’, ‘fitting’, ‘knowing’ and ‘costing’ here.Even though it might be possible to use these verbs in the present continuous in your language, it is not possible in English. Remember, verbs that refer to the way we feel, such as LIKE and LOVE, are normally just present simple. Also, verbs that describe belief, like BELIEVE or KNOW, and the senses, like SEE or HEAR, are normally just present simple.It is sometimes possible to use the continuous form for some of these verbs, but it changes the meaning. If you say: “I think I AM SEEING things” for example, it means ‘imagining something that’s not real’. If you say: “I AM SEEING someone”, it means ‘dating’.Do you LIKE learning English? I KNOW you do! So go to ANGLOPOD.COM to learn more! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Verbs that are never continuous
6d ago
Verbs that are never continuous
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to continue to learn about English tenses by taking a look at verbs in English that are never, or hardly ever, used in the continuous form.In the previous lesson, we learnt about the difference between the present simple and continuous tense and how the meaning can change when the form of the verb changes. However, there are some verbs that we just don’t use in the continuous form. For example, you say: “I LIKE these shoes”. You don’t say: “I AM LIKING these shoes”. That just sounds very strange.These verbs normally refer to how we feel, what we like and what we believe. Here are a few more examples. You would say: “I LIKE these shoes. They FIT me really well. But I KNOW I can’t afford them because they COST too much!” All these verbs are in the present simple. They would sound very strange in the continuous form, so you couldn’t say ‘liking’, ‘fitting’, ‘knowing’ and ‘costing’ here.Even though it might be possible to use these verbs in the present continuous in your language, it is not possible in English. Remember, verbs that refer to the way we feel, such as LIKE and LOVE, are normally just present simple. Also, verbs that describe belief, like BELIEVE or KNOW, and the senses, like SEE or HEAR, are normally just present simple.It is sometimes possible to use the continuous form for some of these verbs, but it changes the meaning. If you say: “I think I AM SEEING things” for example, it means ‘imagining something that’s not real’. If you say: “I AM SEEING someone”, it means ‘dating’.Do you LIKE learning English? I KNOW you do! So go to ANGLOPOD.COM to learn more! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Present simple and continuous
Jul 25 2022
Present simple and continuous
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about English tenses and in particular the difference between the simple and continuous form of the present tense. When do we use present simple and when do we use present continuous? Let’s find out more…We normally use the present simple in English to talk about things that usually happen or things that are generally true, so it’s useful to talk about habits or repeated actions. For example, “I HAVE eggs for breakfast every day”. So we don’t say: “I AM HAVING eggs every day”. That sounds strange.We use the present continuous to talk about a temporary situation, an action that is happening right now. So you could say: “I AM HAVING breakfast”. This means you are eating now, you are busy, you can’t do anything else. This action is in progress now.You could emphasise that by saying “I AM HAVING breakfast at the moment” or “I AM HAVING breakfast right now”, but it should be clear if you just use the present continuous on its own.So going from present simple to continuous normally changes the meaning of what we want to say. For example, if you say: “I LIVE in London”, this means London is your permanent home. However, if you say: “I AM LIVING in London”, this suggests that the situation is temporary and you will probably move or return home soon.You could develop that sentence by saying “I AM LIVING in London at the moment, but I LIVE in Paris”. London is your temporary home and Paris is your permanent home. So, you ARE LEARNING English right now of course, but DO you LEARN English every day? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM to make learning about English tenses your daily habit, a true and repeated action! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
USED TO and WOULD
Jul 18 2022
USED TO and WOULD
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at the difference between USED TO and WOULD in English. You might think these two words are very different but actually we use them both to talk about past habits. Let’s learn more…So, in the last lesson, we learnt that we use USED TO to talk about past habits. “I USED TO PLAY football” or “I USED TO GO swimming”. But there is another way to talk about past habits. You could use the modal verb WOULD.For example, “When I was a child, I WOULD PLAY football” or “I WOULD GO swimming”. It’s another great way to talk about your past habits. “When I was a student, I WOULD GET UP late, I WOULD GO to lots of parties, I WOULD have too much homework!”However, there is one main difference. We can use USED TO to talk about actions and states in the past, but we can only use WOULD to talk about actions in the past. So we can say “I USED TO PLAY football” or “I WOULD PLAY football” because they’re both actions, but you can’t use WOULD for a state. You could say “I USED TO BE shorter” but not “I WOULD BE shorter”, because the verb ‘be’ refers to a state, not an action.One final rule. When you write USED TO in a negative sentence or a question, you write USE TO (without ‘d’), so “I USED TO PLAY football”, “I DIDN’T USE TO PLAY football” and “DID you USE TO PLAY football?” But the good news is that the pronunciation is exactly the same. You can’t hear the difference. It always sounds like USED TO.So, I USED TO PLAY football a lot at school. I WOULD PLAY lots of different sports. How about you? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us about all the repeated actions in your past, the actions you did as a habit, but you don’t do now. See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
USED TO DO and USED TO DOING
Jul 11 2022
USED TO DO and USED TO DOING
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn the difference between USED TO DO and USED TO DOING in English. The first one is used for talking about past habits but the second one is quite different. We use it to talk about things we are accustomed to. Let’s learn more…Firstly, we use USED TO to talk about things we did again and again in the past but we don’t do now. So these are repeated habits. Think about things you did every day when you were a child. For example, “I USED TO PLAY football”. This is something I did every day at school. Unfortunately, I don’t have the time now, but I USED TO PLAY football”.But what does it mean if you say I AM USED TO PLAYING? I’M USED TO PLAYING? You could say “I’M USED TO PLAYING football”. The meaning here is very different. It means that playing football was strange or not normal for you at the beginning, but after lots of practice it now feels normal. You have improved, you like it. You ARE USED TO DOING it. You are accustomed to it.Here’s another example. “I’M USED TO SPEAKING English now”. This means that at the beginning it was strange or difficult for you, but now after lots of practice you feel more comfortable and it is much easier or normal for you.ARE you USED TO SPEAKING English now? Does it feel more normal for you now? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments. Also, you can tell us about your past habits with USED TO as well. For example, “I USED TO be bad at English but now I’m much better”! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE
Jul 4 2022
WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about the difference between using WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE. We use WOULD YOU LIKE to make offers or suggestions, but we use DO YOU LIKE to ask someone their opinion about something. Let’s find out more…Firstly, you could use WOULD YOU LIKE with a noun, so “WOULD YOU LIKE a glass of wine?” You’re making a specific offer here. You’re offering a glass of wine. However, you could also use DO YOU LIKE with a noun, like this: “DO YOU LIKE wine?” But in this case, you’re asking for an opinion. What does this person think about wine in general? You could say “DO YOU LIKE wine?” and then say “WOULD YOU LIKE some wine?” or “WOULD YOU LIKE a glass of wine?” but DO YOU LIKE and WOULD YOU LIKE have different purposes.You can also use WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE with a verb, but the structure is different. You could make a suggestion or invite someone by saying: “WOULD YOU LIKE to go dancing tonight?” or “WOULD YOU LIKE to dance with me?” This is a specific suggestion or invitation, so the verb after WOULD YOU LIKE is infinitive, ‘to dance’ or ‘to go dancing’.However, you could ask for a general opinion about dancing: “DO YOU LIKE dancing?” You’re asking if that person enjoys the activity of dancing, so in this case DO YOU LIKE is followed by the gerund form of the verb, meaning the -ing form. A gerund is just a noun made from a verb.So, I have a couple of questions for you. DO YOU LIKE learning English? WOULD YOU LIKE to learn more English? Then go to ANGLOPOD.COM and answer those questions in the comments! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
MUST BE and CAN'T BE
Jun 27 2022
MUST BE and CAN'T BE
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about the modal verb expressions MUST BE and CAN’T BE in English. We use them to discuss probability, how sure we feel about something. Let’s find out more…Imagine you are trying to solve a crime, like a detective. Think of Sherlock Holmes or even Batman! A detective needs to find clues, evidence, information to help them understand what happened. When the detective is sure what happened, they might say “He MUST BE guilty!” This means they are 100 percent sure or very close to 100 percent.However, another way to show how sure they feel is to use CAN’T BE, so for example “He CAN’T BE innocent!” As ‘innocent’ is the opposite of ‘guilty’ both phrases mean the same. “He MUST BE guilty” and “He CAN’T BE innocent”. I am 100 percent sure! In that case, “He MUST BE guilty” and “He CAN’T BE guilty” mean the opposite.If you’re not sure, you could say “He MIGHT BE guilty” or “He MAY BE guilty”. The modal verbs MIGHT and MAY express possibility, not probability, and so you’re saying that you are not sure. You are only 50 percent sure.So what are you sure about? What do you think MUST BE true or CAN’T BE true, based on what you know? English CAN’T BE the hardest language to learn, right? There MUST BE other languages that are harder? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments. See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
HAVE TO and MUST
Jun 13 2022
HAVE TO and MUST
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at the difference between HAVE TO and MUST in English. They are both very common modal verbs that we use to express obligation. But is there a difference? And what is the difference? Let’s find out…Let’s start with a simple example. You can say “I HAVE TO do my homework” or you can say “I MUST do my homework” and it is clear that this is something that needs to be completed. There is an obligation here. That’s why we use these two modal verbs, HAVE TO and MUST. But there is a difference.The difference is between external and internal obligation. If you say “I HAVE TO do my homework”, the obligation is external. This means it comes from outside, from someone else, not from you. “I HAVE TO do my homework” because my teacher told me to do it or my parents expect me to do it. Not because I want to do it. “I HAVE TO do my homework”.But if you say “I MUST do my homework”, this means the obligation is internal. It comes from inside, it comes from me. “I MUST do my homework” because it’s important to me. I want to do it because I want to learn or I want to pass my exams.One important note. There is no past form of MUST, so we just use HAVE TO in the past. HAD TO. “I MUST do it”, present; “I HAD TO do it”, past. The same with questions. You can’t use MUST with question words, so use HAVE TO again. Just say “Do you HAVE TO do it?”, which is present, or “Did you HAVE TO do it?”, which is past.OK, what would you say now? “I HAVE TO practise English” or “I MUST practise English”? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
MUST, SHOULD, OUGHT TO with present perfect
Jun 6 2022
MUST, SHOULD, OUGHT TO with present perfect
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to focus on using the modal verbs MUST, SHOULD and OUGHT TO with the present perfect. We use them together to talk about something we thought would happen but didn’t.This will be easier to understand if we look at an example together. If you’re waiting for someone, but they still haven’t arrived, you might feel worried or even angry. If they don’t have a long way to travel or they started their journey to meet you a long time ago, you could say “He SHOULD HAVE arrived by now!” You might feel frustrated or concerned. “He SHOULD HAVE arrived by now!”Notice that after the modal verb SHOULD we use HAVE without ‘to’. So don’t say “He SHOULD to HAVE arrived”. That’s wrong. So, “He SHOULD HAVE arrived”. It’s also important to note the pronunciation here. HAVE is a grammar word, so the pronunciation is weak. So really we say “He SHOULD’VE arrived”, “He SHOULD’VE”.You could also use OUGHT TO as it means the same thing. “He OUGHT TO HAVE arrived”. This is less common but you will hear people use it. If you are sure this thing has happened, you can say “He MUST HAVE arrived” or “He MUST’VE arrived”. So you are sure that this has now happened.So, remember. When you use the present perfect after these modal verbs to talk about something you think has happened by now, don’t use ‘to’. “He SHOULD’VE arrived by now”. OK, now go to ANGLOPOD.COM to learn more English online. You SHOULD’VE done this by now! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Modal verbs
May 30 2022
Modal verbs
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn how to use modal verbs with the bare infinitive in English. This means we’re going to focus on how we use modal verbs followed by another verb in a sentence.Firstly, what is a modal verb? Well, it is a type of auxiliary verb, a helping verb, which expresses some form of modality, such as ability, permission or possibility. For example, we can use the modal verb CAN to express ability: “I CAN play the piano”. I am able to do this, I have the skill or knowledge to do this. But we can also use CAN for permission: “CAN I go to the bathroom?” (although this is a more informal use of CAN here. Some people prefer to use the more formal modal verb MAY).However, when using modal verbs it is very important to remember that after the modal verb we don’t use the full infinitive (which just means the ‘to’ infinitive of the verb). So we say “I CAN play the piano” not “I CAN to play the piano”. This confuses many students because this rule does not exist in many other languages.Let’s see an example with a different modal verb. “You MUST do your homework”, not “You MUST to do your homework”. The modal verb MUST here is used to express obligation. Another example. “I MIGHT come to the party”, not “I MIGHT to come to the party”. The modal verb MIGHT here is being used to express possibility.So, remember that the main verb that follows a modal verb in English should be the ‘bare infinitive’, so no ‘to’. OK, now go to ANGLOPOD.COM to learn more English online. You MUST DO this! You MUSTN’T FORGET! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
HAVE something DONE
May 23 2022
HAVE something DONE
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to focus on the expression HAVE something DONE in English. This is a very common expression but it is often confusing for English students. It has a passive meaning and it means that someone does something for us, either because we can’t do it or we don’t know how to do it. Let’s find out more…Let’s start with a simple example to see what I mean. If I have a new haircut, my students often say to me: “You cut your hair!” But I have to say no, because this sentence is wrong in English. It doesn’t make much sense really!Firstly, I don’t know how to cut hair. I have never learnt how to cut hair, I’m not a barber or a hairdresser, right? I’m an English teacher! Secondly, have you ever tried to cut your own hair? I think it’s very difficult, right? I don’t think the result would be good!So the correct sentence is “I HAD my hair CUT”. “I HAD my hair CUT”. This means another person did it for me. So you say TO HAVE something DONE. You can use it for anything that another person does for you, because it’s difficult for you to do, you don’t want to do it, or you don’t have the necessary skills to do it.Here are some more examples. I HAD my car FIXED. I don’t know how to fix cars myself. I HAD my house PAINTED. It’s a difficult job and I don’t want to do it myself. And every month, I HAVE my hair CUT, because I can’t do it myself!There is another way you could say this. You could say GET something DONE. It means exactly the same thing. So I GOT my car FIXED, I GOT my house PAINTED, and every month, I GET my hair CUT.So what do you HAVE DONE? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments. Unfortunately, learning English is something you can’t HAVE DONE, right? You have to do it yourself! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Active and passive
May 16 2022
Active and passive
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at active and passive voice in English. This is a very important grammatical structure in English. We use it for different reasons, such as changing the focus of the sentence. Let’s look at some examples…Here’s a simple example: “The cat ATE the mouse”, active, “The mouse WAS EATEN by the cat”, passive. The passive form is really useful if we want to change the focus of the sentence. In this case, we want to focus on the mouse and not the cat.So how do we make the passive? It’s quite easy. Just use the auxiliary verb ‘to be’ and add the past participle form of the main verb. What’s the past participle? In this case, the present is EAT, the past is ATE, and the past participle is EATEN. EAT, ATE, EATEN. “The cat ATE the mouse”, “The mouse WAS EATEN (by the cat)”.There are different reasons why we use the passive voice in English. Sometimes we don’t know who did the action, like in a crime. So we could say “My car WAS STOLEN”. We don’t know who stole my car, so passive is really useful here. Note that it’s not necessary to say “My car WAS STOLEN (by a thief)”. That’s obvious, right? This is another reason why passive voice is so useful in English. Here’s another good example. “English IS SPOKEN all around the world”. This is good for talking about people in general. It sounds much better than “People speak English all around the world”. Again, obviously we’re talking about people. You might also see a sign in a hotel or a shop that says: “English IS SPOKEN here”. It sounds more formal than saying “We speak English here” or “Everyone speaks English here”. So passive can be more formal or less direct as well.OK, that’s a very brief overview of active and passive in English. It’s good to keep it simple. Can you think of any good examples using the passive voice in a natural way? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and write them in the comments. See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Linking verbs
May 9 2022
Linking verbs
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about linking verbs and how we use them in a sentence. These verbs do not describe an action. They are used to describe a state, a feeling or a result. Let’s look at some examples…The most common example of a linking verb is BE. For example, I AM a teacher, you ARE a student. In these examples, the verb BE is used to describe a state, not an action, and it is followed in both examples with a noun, not an adverb. In the examples here, ‘a teacher’ and ‘a student’.It’s also very common to use linking verbs with the senses, so you can say that some food TASTES GOOD or some music SOUNDS GOOD. Even though they are verbs, you are not describing an action, so you would not say TASTES or SOUNDS WELL. So, “this food TASTES GREAT” or “that music SOUNDS AMAZING”. Linking verb plus adjective, in these two examples, ‘great’ and ‘amazing’.Here are the five linking verbs for describing the senses: FEEL, LOOK, SMELL, SOUND and TASTE. For example, “You LOOK SAD” or “I FEEL SICK”.Here are some of the most common linking verbs to describe states of being: BECOME, APPEAR, SEEM, GET, REMAIN and GROW. For example, “This IS BECOMING A PROBLEM” or “Things are GETTING BETTER”.So go to ANGLOPOD.COM and practise using these linking verbs in the comments. Describe a state, feeling or result with these verbs. It LOOKS EASY, right? Show us that your English IS GETTING BETTER! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Reflexive verbs
May 2 2022
Reflexive verbs
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at reflexive verbs in English. What is a reflexive verb? This is a verb where the action has an effect on the person doing it. Let’s see some examples together…One of the most common reflexive verbs is ENJOY. You can ENJOY SOMETHING, for example, you can ENJOY A PARTY or ENJOY A MOVIE, but you can also ENJOY YOURSELF, which makes it a reflexive verb. The verb ENJOY describes the effect on you. You can ENJOY A PARTY or ENJOY YOURSELF AT A PARTY. The second example is reflexive, because this is the effect the experience has on you.Another good example is TEACH. Someone can TEACH you English or you can TEACH YOURSELF English, if you do this on your own, to yourself, so the second example is reflexive. Someone can TEACH you English, or you can TEACH YOURSELF English.However, reflexive verbs are not as common in English as some other languages, so for example, we don’t say I DRESSED MYSELF today, or I WASHED MYSELF today. That would sound strange. It is more natural to say I GOT DRESSED or I HAD A WASH.Some other common reflexive verbs in English are INTRODUCE YOURSELF, HELP YOURSELF, AMUSE YOURSELF, CONVINCE YOURSELF, BLAME YOURSELF, HURT YOURSELF, PREPARE YOURSELF, DRIVE YOURSELF and BEHAVE YOURSELF.So, when did you last ENJOY YOURSELF? Have you ever TAUGHT YOURSELF something? Did you TEACH YOURSELF English? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments. See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
I CAN'T AFFORD it
Apr 25 2022
I CAN'T AFFORD it
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to talk about the verb AFFORD and how we should use it. We normally use this verb to talk about money and how much money we have, although it can be used to refer to other things as well, such as time.The reason we’re going to focus on AFFORD is because it has a particular verb pattern so we can use it correctly. Let’s look at an example to see what we mean. You could say: I CAN’T AFFORD to go out tonight, I CAN’T AFFORD to go out tonight. In this example, we’re expressing an ability (or lack of ability, in this case) to do something because of cost. This suggests that I don’t have enough money, so I am not able to do this thing, go out tonight.So to use the verb AFFORD, we have to use the modal verb CAN before it. The verb AFFORD doesn’t make sense on its own. You can’t say: I afford it. You have to say: I CAN AFFORD it, or I CAN’T AFFORD it.Here are some more examples: I CAN AFFORD to travel by bus, but I CAN’T AFFORD to travel by taxi. I CAN AFFORD to buy a sandwich, but I CAN’T AFFORD to buy a meal. I CAN AFFORD to live in a flat, but I CAN’T AFFORD to live in a house.So remember, don’t use AFFORD on its own. It won’t make sense. Use it with CAN. That was a simple lesson. Now go to ANGLOPOD.COM and try the quiz. Then write your own example sentences in the comments. Good luck and see you in the next class!Get the FREE eBook: See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
I WISH I KNEW and I WISH I HAD KNOWN
Apr 18 2022
I WISH I KNEW and I WISH I HAD KNOWN
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and in the last lesson we talked about using the verb WISH to talk about unreal situations in the present. Things that we would like to change now, but we can’t. In this lesson, we’re going to look at the difference between a wish in the present and a wish in the past. What’s the difference? How does the sentence change?Let’s use the example I WISH I KNEW from the verb TO KNOW. So as you remember from the last lesson, to make a wish about the present, we need to use the verb in the past, because this is not a real situation. It’s what we call a hypothetical situation, which means unreal. We are imagining this situation. I WISH I KNEW. For example, I WISH I KNEW the answer, I WISH I KNEW the answer. This means I don’t know the answer now, but I really want to know now! Maybe I’m doing an exam and it’s very hard, so I think to myself I WISH I KNEW the answer! Unfortunately I don’t, and I can’t change this situation, because I’m doing the exam now and I can’t check!Now, imagine the exam is now finished and I’m worried that I did very badly. I think I probably failed the exam because I didn’t know the answer during the exam. I’m now making a wish about the past. So if we use the verb in the past to talk about a present wish, we use the verb in the past perfect to talk about a past wish, like this: I WISH I HAD KNOWN the answer, I WISH I HAD KNOWN the answer. This is now a wish about the past and the past is finished so there is nothing we can do to change the past (unless you have a time machine!) so I say to myself: I WISH I HAD KNOWN the answer. That’s WISH followed by the past perfect, in this case HAD KNOWN.So, I WISH I KNEW the answer (a wish about the present) and I WISH I HAD KNOWN the answer (a wish about the past). And just a quick point about pronunciation. To make it quicker and easier to pronounce, we often say: I WISH I’D KNOWN, I WISH I’D KNOWN, so HAD is a weak sound.I hope that’s clear. It’s really important to practise this to help you understand better, so go to ANGLOPOD.COM and try the quiz. Then write your own example sentences in the comments. Good luck and see you in the next class!Get the FREE eBook: See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
I WISH I WAS or I WISH I WERE?
Apr 11 2022
I WISH I WAS or I WISH I WERE?
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to focus on the verb WISH to talk about things we would like to be different but we cannot change. Why can we not change them? Well, either we don’t have the power to change them or they happened in the past, so it’s too late to change them!Let’s start with a simple example: I WISH I WERE taller. I WISH I WERE taller. Let’s look at this phrase carefully to understand it. I WISH I WERE taller. What does it mean? Firstly, this is a situation I would like to change. I’m not tall or I’m not tall enough. I want to be taller. Can I change this situation? No! I can’t stretch my body to be taller! I can’t eat special food to be taller. So this is a situation I can’t change.Secondly, am I talking about now, the present? Or am I talking about the past? Well, this is a wish about the present. I want to change this situation now. I’m not happy now, in the present. So, we use WISH followed by the verb in the past, in this case WERE, from the verb TO BE. So we don’t say I wish I am, we say I WISH I WERE. That is because this is not a real situation. So in English, we use the verb in the past to talk about an unreal situation in the present, in this case: I WISH I WERE.Now you might think, why do we use WERE and not WAS? I WISH I WAS? I WAS, YOU WERE, right? Well, the simple answer is that you could use either. They are both possible. You can say: I WISH I WERE or I WISH I WAS and everyone will understand you. In fact, it’s very common for people to say I WISH I WAS. It sounds more informal and you’ll hear people using it when they’re speaking all the time. So, I WISH I WERE taller, or I WISH I WAS taller. However, grammatically it is more correct to say I WISH I WERE, because this is not a real situation.OK, that’s how you talk about a wish or desire in the present, a situation you can’t change. Remember, use the verb WISH followed by the verb in the past, in this example I WISH I WERE or I WISH I WAS, if you want to sound a bit more informal. I WISH I WERE taller, I WISH I WERE smarter, I WISH I WERE richer, I WISH I WERE faster, I WISH I WERE stronger! What examples can you think of?So these are all examples of wishes about the present. How do we use it in the past? We’ll look at that in the next lesson. For now, go to ANGLOPOD.COM and try the quiz. Then write your own example sentences in the comments. Good luck and see you in the next class!Get the FREE eBook:  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
LIKE DOING or LIKE TO DO?
Mar 29 2022
LIKE DOING or LIKE TO DO?
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at the difference between LIKE DOING and LIKE TO DO. This often causes students lots of problems because the meaning changes between the two, but it’s not always obvious what the difference is. Don’t worry, in this lesson I’ll make it very clear for you. Let’s look at some examples to help us understand better. Firstly, you could say: I LIKE PLAYING football, I LIKE WATCHING movies.  I LIKE EATING pizza, I LIKE DRINKING wine, I LIKE SPENDING time with friends, I LIKE GOING to the beach.What do these examples sound like? That’s right. They’re all examples of things you enjoy. So if you want to talk about something you enjoy, something that is nice to do, use LIKE followed by a gerund, which is the ING form of the verb. You could change the verb and still express how much you like or dislike something: I LOVE EATING pizza, I DISLIKE EATING pizza, I HATE EATING pizza, I DETEST EATING pizza.How about these examples: I LIKE TO GO to bed early, I LIKE TO VISIT the dentist twice a year, I LIKE TO EAT vegetables every day, I LIKE TO DRINK lots of water, I LIKE TO DO my homework as soon as I get home. What do these examples sound like? Look at the context. Do they sound like things you enjoy? Not really, right? Visiting the dentist or doing homework are not normally things we enjoy. So, when we use LIKE followed by the full infinitive, which means the verb with TO, this means that I think it is a good idea. I LIKE TO VISIT the dentist twice a year. I don’t enjoy it, but I think it’s a good idea. I LIKE TO DO my homework as soon as I get home. I don’t enjoy it, but I think it’s a good idea.So, LIKE plus the gerund means you enjoy it, LIKE plus the full infinitive means you think it’s a good idea, easy! Do you LIKE PRACTISING English? Or maybe you LIKE TO PRACTISE English. Either way, go to ANGLOPOD.COM and try the quiz. Then you can write your own example sentences in the comments. I think that’s both enjoyable and a good idea! Good luck and see you in the next class!Get the FREE eBook: See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
I SUGGEST THAT you…
Mar 22 2022
I SUGGEST THAT you…
Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at a very common verb that is often confusing for students to use in a sentence. We’ll look at some examples to learn how to use it and we’ll also see how not to use it. The verb in today’s lesson is SUGGEST and how we use it when we want to SUGGEST an action.The reason why it causes problems is because it has a specific verb pattern. So when we use SUGGEST, we say: I SUGGEST THAT… followed by the rest of the phrase. Here are some examples:I SUGGEST THAT you practise your English. I SUGGEST THAT you do your homework on time. I SUGGEST THAT you study harder. I SUGGEST THAT you listen to English every day. After SUGGEST use THAT followed by the rest of the sentence.It’s also quite common to drop or leave out THAT if we’re speaking quickly or informally. So you can say: I SUGGEST you study harder. I SUGGEST you study harder.However, we don’t say: I SUGGEST YOU to study harder. Don’t use the full infinitive here. “I SUGGEST THAT you study harder” or “I SUGGEST you study harder. You could also say: I SUGGEST STUDYING harder, so SUGGEST plus a gerund. That’s possible. So, “I SUGGEST THAT you study harder”, “I SUGGEST you study harder” or “I SUGGEST STUDYING harder”.Here’s a different verb you could use. Instead of SUGGEST, you could use RECOMMEND. “I RECOMMEND THAT you study harder” or “I RECOMMEND you study harder” or “I RECOMMEND STUDYING harder”. But remember, don’t say: I RECOMMEND you to study harder.OK, I SUGGEST THAT you go to ANGLOPOD.COM and try the quiz. Also, I RECOMMEND WRITING your own example sentences in the comments. Good luck and see you in the next class!Get the FREE eBook: See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.