The Action Research Podcast

Adam Stieglitz & Joe Levitan

In the first podcast dedicated solely to Action Research, Adam and Joe do a deep dive into the lives, experiences, philosophies, and - of course - investigations of the most well respected action researchers in the field. Hear about their greatest successes and failures, and learn about what makes Action Research unique. If you are passionate about social change, engage in research, or are a budding scholar then this is the perfect podcast for you. Intended mostly for those interested in research and social change, The Action Research Podcast aims to offer unique and valuable insights for the field through accessible and engaging conversations about the “what” “why” and “how” of Action Research. The Action Research Team: Adam Stieglitz, Co-host Joe Levitan, Co-host Shikha Diwakar, Production Manager Vanessa Gold, Sound technician and voice-over specialist read less

Rethinking the Communication of Action Research with Patricia Canto and Miren Larrea
Dec 30 2022
Rethinking the Communication of Action Research with Patricia Canto and Miren Larrea
In this episode, we welcome two guests, Patricia Canto andMiren Larrea, who recently published a paper together titled “Rethinking the Communication of Action Research: Can we Make it Dialogic?” Adam and Joe bring you an enriching conversation with the authors. Patricia Canto is a researcher at Orkestra-Basque Institute of Competitiveness. She holds a PhD in Social Sciences from University of Deusto. She investigates the role that communication plays in articulating academic knowledge in territorial development processes and international knowledge networks. Her research areas include the social impact of research, scholarly publishing and communication, and universities’ role in regional socioeconomic development. Miren Larrea is a senior researcher at Orkestra. She began her professional career as a research assistant at the University of Deusto, where she wrote her doctoral thesis on the local production systems of the Basque Country. After a decade dedicated to teaching and research, she worked for six years at a local development agency, where she combined her experience as a regional development professional with her work as a university researcher.The episode starts with a “Lightning Round”, asking questions like, What is AR? What is the most important component of Action Research? What is a major consideration when communicating AR? What distinguishes AR from other forms of research? (4:15). Later in the episode, our guests share the story behind the collaboration that led to the article (6:46), along with discussion about some important themes highlighted in the paper such as: how do you hold true to AR principles like dialogue in the communication of your research findings (10:23)? Why do linear formats in AR communication reduce its potential to transform society (11:39)? How do we make action research dialogic and inclusive with all the stakeholders involved (21:01)? Tune in to listen! Links https://dgroups.org/groups/perfadtReferencesCanto-Farachala, P., & Larrea, M. (2022). Rethinking the communication of action research: Can we make it dialogic? Action Research, 20(2), 199–218**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research with Joe (Part-2)
Dec 1 2022
Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research with Joe (Part-2)
Welcome back to Part 2 of the episode; Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research with Joe. In this episode, we are continuing our conversation from last season on ethical relationship building based on an article that Joe published. If you haven’t heard that one, it is episode 10 of season 2. It’s great when friends of the podcast engage with our conversations, and in this episode, our good friend Alfredo Ortiz Aragon sent us some great insights about thinking through some of the implications of the ideas in the first episode and trying to find different ways to contextualize some points. Joe, Vanessa, & Adam start the conversation with responding to Ortiz’s comments (2:13). They then carefully articulate their thoughts on themes such as role of emotions in research (8:11), how emotions can manifest in the field (11:25), how relationship building through reflexivity is both internal and external process (22:57), and how we can build ethical relationships while navigating the complexities in the AR process (29:01). Tune in to listen to this wholesome episode with our trio Joe, Vanessa and Adam.  ReferencesLevitan, J.(2019). Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research: Getting Out ofWestern Norms to Foster Equitable Collaboration. The Canadian Journal of ActionResearch. 21 (1), 11-29.Levitan, J., & Johnson, K. M. (2020). Salir adelante: Collaboratively developing culturally grounded curriculum with marginalized communities. American Journal of Education, 126(2), 195-230.Levitan, J. (2018). The danger of a single theory: Understanding students’ voices and social justice in the Peruvian Andes. Teachers College Record, 120(2), 1-36.**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Special Episode! Book talk: Student Voice  Research: Theory, Methods, and Innovations From the Field with Marc & Joe
Oct 27 2022
Special Episode! Book talk: Student Voice Research: Theory, Methods, and Innovations From the Field with Marc & Joe
In this special episode, the AR Pod team discusses an amazing new book by our very own Joe Levitan and friend of the Podcast, Marc Brasof. The book, Student Voice Research: Theory, Methods, and Innovations from the Field, discusses the “how” of useful and quality student voice research to make schools better places to learn. The book has a lot of overlaps with Action Research.  This firsthand conversation by the editors of the book delves into why not only the theoretical understanding of student voice research is important but also practical knowledge from the field. Joe, Adam and Marc, bring highlights about the process of this collaboration, how this book came into existence, and some comments about the field. The book is not just relevant for students but also practitioners in action research who would like to include youth in change processes and research. Many of these paradigms, methodologies, or ways of thinking about information and decision-making need more of procedural knowledge which this book offers. Alright, no more spoilers, listen to the episode to know more about the book from editors themselves!Also, a special shout out to Vanessa Gold, co-producer of this podcast, who co-authored one of the chapters in this book!Here’s the link to the book:https://www.amazon.com/Student-Voice-Research-Methods-Innovations/dp/0807767131**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Ethical Relationship building in Action Research with Joe Levitan (Part 1)
Jun 28 2022
Ethical Relationship building in Action Research with Joe Levitan (Part 1)
Welcome to our last episode of season two where the host becomes the guest!For this season finale, we put Joe on the hot seat to discuss his amazing article published in 2019 on Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research. Vanessa, Shikha, and Cory, the production team of the podcast (and Joe’s supervisees), take this opportunity to ask Joe some hard-hitting questions. The discussion opens with the lightning round (2:14): What is ethical relationship building? Why is ethical relationship building in action research important? What’s the number one thing researchers can do to support ethical relationship building in their work? What’s theoretical orthodoxy? Why is interrogating theoretical orthodoxy important in Action Research?Later in the episode, we start to dig deeper into Joe’s responses to the lightning round questions. We ask: what are the major turns in the relationship building in the AR process? (5:22), how might Action Researchers build an ethical relationship with the diversity within a community? (15:10) how might an Action Researcher create a meaningful space for communicating difficult emotions? (20:29)? Tune in to listen more! Then, stay tuned for Season 3 of the Action Research Podcast coming out in September 2022! You will hear more about building ethical relationships in action research (Part 2 of this series), and hear more voices from the field! ReferencesLevitan, J. (2019). Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research: Getting Out of Western Norms to Foster Equitable Collaboration. The Canadian Journal of Action Research. 21 (1), 11-29.Levitan, J., & Johnson, K. M. (2020). Salir adelante: Collaboratively developing culturally grounded curriculum with marginalized communities. American Journal of Education, 126(2), 195-230.Levitan, J. (2018). The danger of a single theory: Understanding students’ voices and social justice in the Peruvian Andes. Teachers College Record, 120(2), 1-36.**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Action Research with Ernie Stringer
May 31 2022
Action Research with Ernie Stringer
This episode brings you stories of action research from one of the most renowned authors in the field, Ernest T Stringer. He is the author of Action Research (Sage, 2007), Action Research in Education (Pearson, 2008), Action Research in Health (with Bill Genat; Pearson, 2004), and Action Research in Human Services (with Rosalie Dwyer; Pearson, 2005). Starting his career as a primary teacher and school principal, Ernie was a lecturer in education at the Curtin University of Technology in Australia. From the mid-1980s, based at Curtin’s Centre for Aboriginal Studies, he worked collaboratively with Aboriginal staff and community people to develop a wide variety of innovative and highly successful education and community development programs and services. This episode consists of a rich discussion around the story of Ernie Stringer and how he got involved with action research (3:33), as well as two of his more recent projects: the Breakfast Club, and the center for Aboriginal studies at Curtin University (13:02). The group then moves on to and the road ahead for action research (38:28). Later in the lightning round segment, Joe and Adam raised our all-time favorite questions around the what, how, and why of the action research (43:30). Tune in to listen to the full episode!  ReferencesStringer, E. T., & Aragón, A. O. (2020). Action research. Sage publications. 5thed.Stringer, E. T. (2014). Action research (4th edition). SAGE.Stringer, E. T. (2007). Action research (3rd edition). Sage Publications.Stringer, E. T. (2008). Action research in education. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Teaching Inquiry and Action Research with Dr. Meghan McGlinn Manfra
Apr 28 2022
Teaching Inquiry and Action Research with Dr. Meghan McGlinn Manfra
In this episode, our team welcomes Dr. Meghan McGlinn Manfra (Ph.D.). She is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at North Carolina State University. She is the author of Action Research for Classroom, Schools, and Communities (Sage) and editor of the Handbook of Social Studies Research (Wiley Press).Joe and Adam open up the conversation with a lightning round (2:54) aiming to ask-what is action research? What does action research look like in education? What has been the greatest challenge for you using AR in your research? Why is it important for teacher professional development? Based on Meghan’s response to some of the lightning round questions, Adam and Joe continue the conversation with Dr. Manfra to understand the process of integrating with the teacher community (8:48), building relationships and developing socially just power dynamics with teachers (10:21), and incorporating student voices in action research (17:39)? Tune in to listen more! ReferencesManfra, M.M. (2021). Action research for classrooms, schools, and communities. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Reviewed in Teacher’s College Record here {https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Jj6dJKGLnaukNrfBwCKsolW3EhAzV4w6/view}Manfra, M. M. (2019). Action Research and Systematic, Intentional Change in Teaching Practice. Review of Research in Education, 43(1), 163–196. https://doi.org/10.3102/0091732X18821132 **If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**CHECK THIS OUT- https://www.tcpress.com/student-voice-research-9780807767122Are you looking for an insightful resource to understand how to emphasize youth voice, specific conceptual tools to reflect on research bias, power dynamics, and relationship building in the meaning-making process? Marc Brasof and Joseph Levitan have developed a comprehensive must-have volume for anyone doing research about and with youth.
Action Research and Transformation with Dr, Davin Carr-Chellman
Feb 28 2022
Action Research and Transformation with Dr, Davin Carr-Chellman
In this episode, our AR Pod team is excited to host Dr. Davin Carr-Chellman, Associate Professor of Education at the University of Dayton, as well as a third-generation watchmaker, a philosopher, and carpenter. This episode covers a range of topics that we reflect on in our daily lives as action researchers. For example, how do we build good relationships? How do we navigate our transformation from an outsider to an insider during an action research project? In navigating our role as a researcher/community participant, how do we reflect on our positionality in order to foster transformation? These topics are hard and time-consuming processes. In this episode, Adam, Davin and Joe reflect on some of these profound topics such as the researchers’ positionality (5:10), the role of trust within AR (5:23), transformation (of insider and outsider) (5:54), the idea of empowerment in AR (6:37), ecologies and systems of relationships in AR (19:54), and relationship building (26:26). To learn more, tune in!ReferencesDelgado-Gaitan, C. (1993). Researching Change and Changing the Researcher. Harvard Educational Review, 63(4), 389–412. https://doi.org/10.17763/haer.63.4.b336053463h71081Davin's work:Wargo, E., Budge, K., Carr-Chellman D., & Canfield-Davis, K. (2021). Leadership for rural school district improvement: The case of one statewide research practice partnership. Journal of Research in Rural Education, 37(1). https://doi.org/10.26209/jrre3701Levitan, J. & Carr-Chellman, D.J. (2018). Learning, selfhood, and pragmatic identity theory: Towards a practical and comprehensive framework of identity development in education. Journal of educational thought, 51(2).Levitan, J., Carr-Chellman, D., & Carr-Chellman, A. (2017). Accidental ethnography: A method for practitioner-based education research. Action Research, 1476750317709078.Carr-Chellman, D.J. & Kroth, M. (2017). The Spiritual disciplines as practices of transformation. International Journal of Adult Vocational Education and Technology. V.8, Issue 1Carr-Chellman, D.J. (2016). Freirean principles for e-learning. eLearn Magazine. vol. 2016, Issue 12. Doi: 10.1145/3022733.3026475**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Introducing a New Segment: Voices from the field- Café Orígenes
Jan 31 2022
Introducing a New Segment: Voices from the field- Café Orígenes
We are excited to introduce you all, our listeners, to a new segment in the Action Research Podcast: Voices from the Field! In this segment we bring you “behind the scenes” of action research projects to demonstrate what action research looks like, in action. The aim of this series is to bring voices from the field to rethink the existence of knowledge in academia.In this trailer episode, Adam and Joe discuss the first of our Voices from the Field Projects. Co-led by our very own Adam Stieglitz, Café Orígenes in Calca Peru is an economic justice action research project with the goal of collaborating with farmers in the Andean highlands to earn a better income for their products. Adam and Joe introduce the first voice from the field, Aaron Ebner, who is the executive director and a co-founder of Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development, a social change organization. Tune in to learn more! Links for relevant episodesEpisode 1-https://player.captivate.fm/episode/a3d61857-58c5-4bb8-bbcb-123361922b54Episode 2- https://player.captivate.fm/episode/c235a206-9a43-4191-b3f0-c7b72bc73c07Episode 3- https://player.captivate.fm/episode/1f8a6e3f-6e36-495a-ad7b-924c0f0804e0Open-source music retrieved from pixabay:"Inspiring Epic Dubstep" and "Documentary" by Coma-Media https://pixabay.com/users/coma-media-24399569/**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Systemic Action Research with Dr. Danny Burns and Dr. Marina Apgar
Dec 23 2021
Systemic Action Research with Dr. Danny Burns and Dr. Marina Apgar
In this episode, our team has an insightful conversation with Dr. Danny Burns and Dr. Marina Apgar. Danny Burns is a Professorial Research Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies (IDS) a think tank affiliated with the University of Sussex in England. He has directed more than 25 action research projects and programmes. His work focuses on participatory learning for social change with a strong emphasis on systems thinking and complexity. Marina Apgar is Research Fellow in the Participation, Inclusion and Social Change cluster at IDS. She is a human ecologist with 20 years experience working in the research-practice divide with marginalised communities in international development supporting learning and change in complex systems.Danny and Marina are working on a large-scale system-changing project called Child Labour: Action-Research-Innovation in South and South-Eastern Asia [CLARISSA]. Started in 2016, CLARISSA has a team of more than 150 members. In this episode, Adam and Joe discuss what AR looks like on the ground, and specifically in a large-scale project. What does the creation process look like? How does this huge collaborative team work reflexively in this AR framework? This conversation starts with our classic lightning round where we dive into questions such as: what is systemic AR? (5:17) what does collaboration look like in systemic AR? (6:34) what is IDS? what makes IDS a fertile ground for this sort of AR? (7:40) And, what is your greatest critique of AR? (12:20).In the later segment, we dive deeper to learn more about CLARISSA, which is built on three core values (but not limited to them): 1. child-centred, 2. participation, and 3. being truly integrated (16:55). This is a really big project that involves a lot of stakeholders, participants, and organizations who work collaboratively in variety of different ways (26:57). How does the creation of processes look in this space? To understand this, Adam and Joe ask questions about how the planning process, facilitation and relationship building looks (36:11). Our team wraps up the conversation by raising one of the classic and significant question that we are trying to explore layer by layer in our podcast-Reflexivity! One of the core components of PAR is reflexivity. Find out how Marina and Danny engage reflexively in such a huge collaborative team in CLARISSA (48:00), by tuning in! ReferencesApgar, J. M., Allen, W., Albert, J., Douthwaite, B., Paz Ybarnegaray, R., & Lunda, J. (2017). Getting beneath the surface in program planning, monitoring and evaluation: Learning from use of participatory action research and theory of change in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems. Action Research, 15(1), 15–34. https://doi.org/10.1177/1476750316673879Zimowski, P. F., Perry, D., Bales, D. K., Davis, D. T., Mattar, D. M. Y., Burrows, H., Moore, H., Ochen, V., Christopher, E., Jewell, S., Smiragina-Ingelström, P., Cockayne, D. J., Setter, C., Ariyo, D., Kumar, V., Otiende, S., Trodd, D. Z., McQuade, D. A., Greer, B. T., … Liwanga, R.-C. (2021). Child Labour Special Edition: JOURNAL OF MODERN SLAVERY A multidisciplinary exploration of human trafficking solutions. Publisher: SlaveFree Today. 6(4), 152.Other linkshttps://clarissa.global/https://clarissa.global/resource/designing-a-participatory-programme-at-scale/
Student Voice and Action Research with Marc I. Brasof
Nov 22 2021
Student Voice and Action Research with Marc I. Brasof
In this episode, we invited Dr. Marc Brasof, an Associate Professor at the School of Education, Arcadia University to talk about student voice research and how this paradigm may interweave (or not) with Action Research. Dr. Brasof was a founding faculty member and history/social studies teacher at Constitution High School—Pennsylvania's only history- and civic-themed public school. We also have a special guest co-host, our very own Vanessa Gold, whose dissertation research focuses specifically on Student Voice and Action Research!We cover a range of themes centering student voice and action research in this episode, such as reflexivity, power dynamics, intersubjectivity, and contextualizing methods to the environment. The conversation starts with Vanessa asking hard hitting questions in our lightening round (5:11). She asks about Student Voice Research, some misconceptions about student voice, the importance of adults collaborating with youth in research, what high quality research with students looks like/does, and how student voice and action research may be aligned. Later in the episode, our hosts and Marc discuss four pillars of student voice research-reflexivity, power dynamics, intersubjectivity, and context/method selection; what is Reflexivity and how it evolves in student voice research(10:32), how does power dynamics look like considering researchers’ positionality (13:50), how researcher go about method selection with students? (37:16). Tune in to listen more!ReferencesBrasof, M. (2015). Student voice and school governance: Distributing leadership to youth and adults. Routledge. Brasof, M. (2018).Using Linkage Theory to Address the Student Voice Organizational Improvement Paradox. Journal of Ethical Educational Leadership, 1(Special Issue), 44–64. Brasof, M. (2011). Student Input Improves Behavior, Fosters Leadership. Phi Delta Kappan, 93(2), 20–24. https://doi.org/10.1177/003172171109300205Lareau, A. (2018). Journeys through ethnography: Realistic accounts of fieldwork. Routledge.To get in touch with Marc:Twitter handles:@brasof Twitter, @stereotytans IG and TwitterLink- http://stereotytans.com/the-band.html, https://www.facebook.com/brasof **If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Collaboration in Action Research with Dr. Kayla Johnson
Oct 19 2021
Collaboration in Action Research with Dr. Kayla Johnson
In this episode, our AR Pod team is thrilled to host Dr. Kayla Johnson, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation, and the Program Chair of International Education at the University of Kentucky. We invited Dr. Johnson to talk about one of the trickiest topics in the field of Action Research, collaboration!  What is Collaboration in Action Research? It is hard to define the term, but our trio tries to uncover some of the characteristics of collaboration in this episode. Adam and Joe start the discussion by thinking through collaboration using two lenses—top-down and bottom-up (3:46). Kayla and Joe further elaborate on what bottom-up collaboration looks like in the field (6:52), highlighting six traits: communication, humility, patience, socially just power dynamics, making sure people's voices are heard, and identifying people's strengths and ways to contribute in equitable ways, by bringing insights from their projects in Peru (find links to their work below!). Later in the episode, Adam and Joe ask some hard-hitting questions in our lightning round (19:02). Some of the topics discussed are communication in bottom-up collaboration, a sense of humility in the field, patience as an action researcher, and power dynamics in collaboration. Tune in to find out Kayla’s responses! ReferencesJohnson, K. M., & Levitan, J. (2021). Rural indigenous students in Peruvian Urban higher education: interweaving ecological systems of coloniality, community, barriers, and opportunities. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education, 1-22. Johnson, K. M., & Levitan, J. (2021). Exploring the Identities and Experiences of Rural First-Generation Indigenous Students Using Photo-Cued Interviewing. SAGE Publications Ltd.Levitan, J., & Johnson, K. M. (2020). Salir adelante: Collaboratively developing culturally grounded curriculum with marginalized communities. American Journal of Education, 126(2), 195-230.Levitan, J., & Johnson, K. M. (2020). Collaboratively developing culturally-grounded curriculum to foster social justice American Journal of Education, Forum. http://www.ajeforum.com/aje-featurecollaboratively-developing-culturally-grounded-curriculum-to-foster-social-justice-by-joseph-levitan-and-kayla-m-johnson/Johnson, K. M. (2020). Hotdog as metaphor: (Co)Developing stories of learning through photo-cued interviewing. Teachers College Record, 122(9), 1-38.Johnson, K. M., & Levitan, J. (2020). Identity, culture, and iterative curriculum development: Collaborating with girls from Indigenous communities to improve education. International Journal of Student Voice, 7, 1-30. Levitan, J. (2019). Ethical Relationship Building in Action Research: Getting out of Western Norms to Foster Equitable Collaboration. The Canadian Journal of Action Research, 20(1), 10-29.Johnson, K. M. (2018). “Deliberate (Mis) Representations: A Case Study of Teacher Influence on Student Authenticity and Voice in Study Abroad Assessment. International Journal of Student Voice, 3(4), 1-58.**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us a ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Community Based Participatory Research with Dr. Rajesh Tandon
Sep 23 2021
Community Based Participatory Research with Dr. Rajesh Tandon
In this episode, the Ar Pod team welcomes Dr. Rajesh Tandon, an internationally acclaimed leader and practitioner of participatory research and development. In 1982 Dr. Tandon founded the Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA), a voluntary organisation providing support to grassroots initiatives in South Asia and continues to be its Chief Functionary. He also holds a UNESCO Chair on Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education since 2012. He is a prolific writer and scholar and is highly decorated.The conversation opens with an introduction of Dr. Tandon and the story behind PRIA (2:02), followed by a lightening round of questions (8:29), where Joe and Adam ask about the mission and vision of PRIA, a recent project with domestic workers, definitions of community based participatory research and, how is participatory research different from community-based participatory action research. Later in the episode, Adam asks what have been some of the more effective mechanisms or processes that you have used to catalyze participation in the field as it relates to participatory research (19:16). Dr. Tandon responds by placing emphasis on building trust among the stakeholders, facilitating conversation with the community and finding a local trusted organisation. How might a budding scholar identify those local organisations? How can these local organisations be trusted? (26:28). To find out, tune in!ReferencesPRIA. (2019). Knowledge, Voice, Participation Participatory Settlement Enumeration for Sanitation Services in AJMER. Participatory Research in Asia. Retrieved September 9, 2021, from https://pria.org/knowledge_resources.php?id=24&pid=54&start=150&pageuurrll=&cid=&mkey=&field_name=&asc_desc=.PRIA. (2021, February). Participatory Research and Gender in PRIA’s Projects: An Exploration. Retrieved from https://www.pria.org/knowledge_resource/1613564340_Participatory%20Research%20and%20Gender%20in%20PRIAs%20Projects%20An%20Exploration.pdf.Tandon, R., & Hall, B. L. (n.d.). The Power of Collaboration, Creativity and Art in Knowledge Mobilization: Reflections from International Work. Retrieved from https://www.unescochair-cbrsr.org/wp content/uploads/2020/08/Tandon_CCU_SSHRC_KMb.pdf. **To know more about PRIA, visit https://www.pria.org/****If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to shareany feedback, contact us on Twitter@The_ARpod or write to us atActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Episode 20- Rethinking Rigor in Action Research, With Dr. Alfredo Ortiz Aragón
Jun 7 2021
Episode 20- Rethinking Rigor in Action Research, With Dr. Alfredo Ortiz Aragón
In this episode, the AR Pod Team welcomes Dr. Alfredo Ortiz Aragón, an Action-Researcher and Associate Professor in the Graduate Program at the Dreeben School of Education, University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio, Texas, and co-author of Action Research (Fifth Edition) with Ernie Stringer. What does rigor mean in Action Research? Is this term even appropriate for what action researchers do? To discuss these important questions the AR Pod team has a “critically casual” conversation with Alfredo about issues of rigor, quality and what makes good action research. The conversation starts with a quote by Alfredo about the problem with using the term rigor in action research (2:00), which raises a lot of hard-hitting questions, such as: “How might narrow understandings of rigor negatively affect Action Research practice?” and “Should action research be rigorous, or should it simply be responsible? (18:34) Our trio gets critical on the rigid nature of the term rigor to make the point that one needs to be mindful of the moments in action research processes where they should be rigorous and when they should not. Join us in this conversation!  SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are interested in Action Research, be sure to sign up for the 2021 Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) Annual Conference to be held (Virtually) on the 3, 10 and 17 of June. For more details you can go to their website: https://arnawebsite.org/Also, if you are interested in learning more about Community-Based Participatory Action Research, check out this mini-course at the University of Kentucky that will be co-facilitated by Joe! https://education.uky.edu/learning-series/ ReferencesCHECKLAND, P. & HOLWELL, S. 1998. Action Research: Its Nature and Validity Systemic Practice and Action Research, 11, 12.Ortiz Aragón, A., & Giles Macedo, J. C. (2015). Radical epistemology as caffeine for social change. In H. Bradbury (Ed.), The SAGE handbook of action research (3rd ed. pp. 681–690). SAGE.Melrose, M. J. (2001). Maximizing the Rigor of Action Research: Why Would You Want To? How Could You? Field Methods, 13(2), 160–180. https://doi.org/10.1177/1525822X0101300203 **If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter @The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Episode 19- Feminisms and Action Research with Dr. Patricia Maguire
May 17 2021
Episode 19- Feminisms and Action Research with Dr. Patricia Maguire
In this episode, the AR Pod Team welcomes Dr. Patricia Maguire, Professor Emeritus of Education and Counselling at Western New Mexico University’s Gallup Graduate Studies Center, and author of the seminal book Doing Participatory Research: A Feminist Approach. Hear about the role and influence of feminisms on action research, and hear about Pat’s experiences engaging in feminist activism, teaching, and researching for social justice.The conversation starts with Patricia’s intro (3:20) followed by our classic lightning round (6:30). Then, Adam and Joe get deeper into the conversation discussing tricky questions like the absence and marginalization of women and feminisms in AR and its implications for the social construction of knowledge (14:03), the role of reflexivity (16:23), the constructive critiques feminist theories offer in AR paradigms (18:48), how feminist themes can inform research for social change (30:03). Is reflexivity enough to ensure that Action Researchers are doing good work (32:11)? Find out the answers to these questions and more by tuning in!If you are interested in learning more about Dr. Patricia Maguire’s work, her website is an excellent resource, you can find more resources at https://www.patriciamaguire.net/!SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are interested in Action Research, be sure to sign up for the 2021 Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) Annual Conference to be held (Virtually) on the 3, 10 and 17 of June. For more details you can go to their website: https://arnawebsite.org/ ReferencesMaguire, P. (2003). Kinsey Dialogue Series #5: Radicalizing the Everyday. 32.Maguire, P., & Berge, B.-M. (2009). Elbows Out, Arms Linked: Claiming Spaces for Feminisms and Gender Equity in Educational Action Research. In S. Noffke & B. Somekh, The SAGE Handbook of Educational Action Research (pp. 399–408). SAGE Publications Ltd. https://doi.org/10.4135/9780857021021.n37Maguire, P. (1996). Proposing a more Feminist Participatory Research: Knowing and Being Embraced Openly. (p 27-39). In Korrie de Koning & M. Martin (Eds). Participatory research in health: Issues and experiences. London: Zed Books. Also published in Southern Africa by National Progressive Primary Health Care Network (NPPHCN) Johannesburg, South Africa. Maguire, P. (2001) Uneven ground: Feminisms and action research. In P. Reason & H. Bradbury (EDs). Handbook of Action Research (p 59-69) London: SageMaguire, P. (1987). Doing Participatory Research: A Feminist Approach. UMass Center for Int'l Education/School of Education. **If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter @The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**
Episode 18- What is Community-Based Participatory Action Research? with Adam and Joe
Apr 26 2021
Episode 18- What is Community-Based Participatory Action Research? with Adam and Joe
Sometimes, it’s just important to define ideas. In this episode, Adam, and Joe talk about some of the key definitions, principles, and differences between Community Based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR) and other types of Action Research. The conversation opens with a “mini-lecture” from Joe where he talks about action research, participatory action research and CBPAR (1:55). Talking about these concepts theoretically shows some interesting and important differences between these different kinds of action research. However, when Adam and Joe start talking about the practicality of these paradigms they uncover the messiness that action researchers face. The conversation gets deeper as Adam and Joe discuss their experiences in the field and how to overcome the complexity of Action Research in action (and CBPAR in particular) (14:52). The conversation wraps up with some hard-hitting questions such as, what makes for quality action research or participatory action research or community-based participatory action research? (44:56). Who is that knowledge being disseminated to and why? (49:32). These are just the highlights, tune-in to know more!SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are interested in Action Research, be sure to sign up for the 2021 Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) Annual Conference to be held (Virtually) on the 3, 10 and 17 of June. For more details you can go to their website: https://arnawebsite.org/ ReferencesBrydon‐Miller, M. (1997). Participatory action research: Psychology and social change. Journal of Social Issues, 53(4), 657-666.Collins, S. E., Clifasefi, S. L., Stanton, J., Straits, K. J., Gil-Kashiwabara, E., Rodriguez Espinosa, P., ... & Wallerstein, N. (2018). Community-based participatory research (CBPR): Towards equitable involvement of community in psychology research. American Psychologist, 73(7), 884.Gullion, J. S., & Tilton, A. (2020). Researching with: A decolonizing approach to community-based action research. Brill Sense.Israel, B. A., Schulz, A. J., Parker, E. A., & Becker, A. B. (1998). Review of community-based research: assessing partnership approaches to improve public health. Annual review of public health, 19(1), 173-202.Johnson, K. M., & Levitan, J. (2020). Identity, culture, and iterative curriculum development: Collaborating with girls from Indigenous communities to Improve education. International Journal of Student Voice, 7.Kelly, P. J. (2005). Practical suggestions for community interventions using participatory action research. Public Health Nursing, 22(1), 65-73.Levitan, J., Carr-Chellman, D., & Carr-Chellman, A. (2020). Accidental ethnography: A method for practitioner-based education research. Action Research, 18(3), 336-352.Levitan, J., & Johnson, K. M. (2020). Salir adelante: Collaboratively developing culturally grounded curriculum with marginalized communities. American Journal of Education, 126(2), 195-230.MacDonald, C. (2012). Understanding participatory action research: A qualitative research methodology option. The Canadian Journal of Action Research, 13(2), 34-50.Maguire, P. (2006). Uneven ground: Feminisms and action research. Handbook of action research: Concise paperback edition, 60-70.McIntyre, J. (2002). Critical systemic praxis for social and environmental justice: a case study of management, governance, and policy. Systemic Practice and Action Research, 15(1), 3-35.McTaggart, R., Nixon, R., & Kemmis, S. (2017). Critical participatory action research. In The Palgrave international handbook of action research (pp. 21-35). Palgrave Macmillan, New York.Stanton, C. R. (2014). Crossing methodological borders:...
Episode 17- Ethics in Action Research with Dr. Mary Brydon-Miller
Apr 5 2021
Episode 17- Ethics in Action Research with Dr. Mary Brydon-Miller
In this episode, we invited Dr. Mary Brydon-Miller, professor in the Educational Leadership, Evaluation and Organizational Development program at the University of Louisville, to come on the podcast and talk with Joe and Adam about ethics in action research. Her current research focuses on research ethics in educational and community settings, and transforming higher education institutions through action research. The conversation opens with introductions and getting to know who Mary Brydon-Miller is as an action researcher. (4:36) SPOILER ALERT: Hear how spending time with Paulo Freire influenced Mary’s identity as an action researcher! Then, the conversation gets deeper as Adam, Joe, and Mary discuss the tricky issues of ethics and quality within action research. (10:48). Here, topics of discussion include navigating power differentials as an action researcher; conventional versus covenantal ethics; challenges within IRB and the human subject review system; ethical imperialism; and why we need a new system to evaluate ethics in action research. The conversation wraps up with a practical discussion about ways an action researcher can establish their own ethical approach in the field (39:18), such as using the structured ethical reflection process and aligning with one’s own moral compass. This episode is a must listen for anybody interested in action research or participatory methodology! SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are interested in Action Research, be sure to sign up for the 2021 Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) Annual Conference to be held (Virtually) on the 3, 10 and 17th of June. For more details, you can go to their website: https://arnawebsite.org/ ReferencesBrydon-Miller, M. (2007). Ethics and Action Research: Deepening our Commitment to Principles of Social Justice and Redefining Systems of Democratic Practice. 12.Brydon-Miller, M. (2009). Covenantal Ethics and Action Research: Exploring a Common Foundation for Social Research. In D. Mertens & P. Ginsberg, The Handbook of Social Research Ethics (pp. 243–258). SAGE Publications, Inc. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781483348971.n16Brydon-Miller, M., Greenwood, D., & Maguire, P. (2003). Why Action Research? Action Research, 1(1), 9–28. https://doi.org/10.1177/14767503030011002**If you have your own questions about Action Research or want to share any feedback, contact us on Twitter @The_ARpod or write to us at ActionResearchPod@gmail.com.**