Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson

Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson

Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson discusses every working person's work in progress, namely, our quest to be fully human in a working world that all too often makes us feel like machines, in which we often don't even have time to think and that, in the words of Studs Terkel, too often feels like "a Monday through Friday sort of dying."

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Episodes

In Search of Careers for the Common Good Part Four: A conversation with John Sullivan, J.D.
Feb 20 2024
In Search of Careers for the Common Good Part Four: A conversation with John Sullivan, J.D.
In Search of Careers for the Common Good is a four-part series of candid conversations with professionals across three different career stages – early, middle and encore – discussing the ways in which reality and one’s ideals about careers intersect in the search and struggle to find careers for the common good.  In part four of this series, Christopher Wong Michaelson has a discussion with John Sullivan, who recently retired from a long and distinguished career as a corporate lawyer but who remains active in volunteer engagement with organizations such as the Minneapolis Foundation and the Matthew Shepard Foundation. Sullivan shares his story about following his interests rather than a pre-set plan in his search for a career for the common good. He says, “I doubt that my legal work will be remembered for long, but I believe that I have helped local nonprofits become more effective and I have created significant change for the lives of LGBTQ+ people and my hope is that those changes will inspire additional changes by future leaders.” This series is co-sponsored by the following enterprises at the University of St. Thomas: The Center for the Common Good The Alumni, Career & Corporate Engagement Center The Selim Center for Lifelong Learning  The Melrose & The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
A Raisin in the Sun Panel Discussion at the Guthrie Theater
Feb 23 2023
A Raisin in the Sun Panel Discussion at the Guthrie Theater
In this episode, host, Christopher Michaelson, intermixes his commentary with a recording of a panel discussion taken during an in-person event at the Guthrie Theater in May 2022. The special event titled, A Raisin in the Sun: Panel Discussion and Performance, was an experiential opportunity aimed at helping shape the role of business in cultivating racial justice and social equity in the Twin Cities community. Esteemed panelists included Austene Van, director of A Raisin in the Sun, founder of the New Dawn Theater Company, and producing artistic director of the Yellow Tree Theater; Dr. Yohuru Williams, founding director of the Racial Justice Initiative at the University of St. Thomas; and panel moderator, Tina Burnside, cofounder and curator of the Minnesota African American Heritage Museum and Gallery (MAAHMG).A Raisin in the Sun overview:"What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?"In 1951, poet Langston Hughes posed these questions, and Lorraine Hansberry answered with a theatrical masterpiece that broke down racial barriers both on and off stage. The play follows the three-generation Younger family as they grapple with different definitions of the American dream and how to achieve it. When the matriarch, Lena, buys a home in an all-white neighborhood, the Youngers are greeted by thinly veiled racism and financial pitfalls that threaten to pull the family apart and push their dream out of reach.  With special thanks to the generous sponsors for the evenings' events: Guthrie Theater, Robins Kaplan, Ryan Companies, SPS Commerce, Sunrise Banks, Target, US Bank, Verizon, the Racial Justice Initiative, and the Melrose & The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership.Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
Klara and the Sun: A conversation about of the nature of intelligence and the cost (and benefits) of progress.
Nov 14 2022
Klara and the Sun: A conversation about of the nature of intelligence and the cost (and benefits) of progress.
Work in Progress with Christopher Michaelson, discusses every working person’s work in progress, namely, our quest to be fully human in a working world that all too often makes us feel like machines, in which we often don’t even have time to think, and that, in the words of Studs Terkel, too often feels like “a Monday through Friday sort of dying.”In this episode, host Michaelson and two guests: The book reviewer, Fordham University Gabelli School of Business Assistant Professor, Santiago Meija, and University of St. Thomas Associate Professor of Marketing & Academic Director of Business in a Digital World, Lisa Abendroth discuss the book Klara and the Sun written by Nobel Prize-winning author Kazuo Ishiguro. Klara and the Sun is the story of Klara, an Artificial Friend (AF), with incredible observational qualities of humans and humanity; designed to learn and subsequently imitate human behavior, Klara is bought, sold, and tossed into serving as a friend for a girl. While discussing the book's plot, Michaelson, Meija and Abendroth examine its underlying themes including the nature of intelligence, the cost of progress, and the identification and value of "real" relationships.   This book review was also published in The Journal of Business Ethics (JBE) to answer two questions: "Is this book worth reading?" and "What ideas or questions will this book illuminate for anyone with interest in business ethics?"With special thanks for the support of the University of St. Thomas Opus College Business in a Digital World Initiative and the Melrose & The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership.Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
2021 Melrose Twin Cities Principled Leadership Awardees
Jan 14 2022
2021 Melrose Twin Cities Principled Leadership Awardees
The Melrose Twin Cities Principled Leadership Award was established in 2021 to honor Ken Melrose, namesake of the Melrose & The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership and fervent champion of ethics and servant leadership as well as promote an aspirational vision of responsible and responsive leadership in practice.The three inaugural awardees represent differing areas of ongoing service in a professional setting yet share a common commitment to purposefully and positively impacting the Twin Cities community. The awardees’ individual unique areas of focus help further illuminate business’s role in society not only as an economic driver but as a creator and enduring mechanism with the power to ensure a just, equitable, healthy society. Listen and learn more about each worthy awardee, their incredible passion and service to the common good.The inaugural awardees are (in no particular order, simply listed by order of their interviews on the podcast): Minnesota Frontline Healthcare Workers, accepting the award on behalf of the workers is Caroline Njau, Senior Vice President Patient Care Services & Chief Nursing Officer at Children's Minnesota.Omar Williams, Chair, 3M Employee Resource Network: Black Leadership Advancement Coalition (3M BLAC); 3M Area Business Leader: Precision Grinding & Finishing, US & Canada.Galon Miller, CEO of Cyber Intelligence Cyber Security, LLC; Founder and Executive Director of Cyber Warrior Foundation, Inc.; Consultant for Project Got Your Back; & Partnership with Eagle Group of Minnesota Veterans.Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
Twenty Years After 9/11 Part Three: A conversation with Jackie Zins & Stacy Pervall, former representatives of the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund
Aug 30 2021
Twenty Years After 9/11 Part Three: A conversation with Jackie Zins & Stacy Pervall, former representatives of the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund
As the nation approaches the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the podcast features a multipart series that includes interviews with survivors of the terrorist attacks exploring the question, ‘What can the lives that were tragically lost during the 9/11 attacks still teach us about living and working meaningfully?’”This series includes conversations with Fred Price, an executive from investment firm Piper Sandler, which lost 66 people on 9/11; representatives of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, Jackie Zins and Stacy Pervall; and, with Jennifer Tosti-Kharas of Babson College, with whom Michaelson has collaborated on research about meaningful work.In part three of this series, Christopher Michaelson and former representatives of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, attorneys Jackie Zins and Stacy Pervall, discuss the extremely difficult work of monetizing a human life.The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund (VCF) provides compensation to individuals (or a personal representative of a deceased individual) who were present at the World Trade Center or the surrounding New York City Exposure Area; the Pentagon crash site; and the Shanksville, Pennsylvania crash site, at some point between September 11, 2001, and May 30, 2002, and who have since been diagnosed with a 9/11-related illness.  The VCF is not limited to first responders.  Compensation is also available to those who worked or volunteered in construction, clean-up, and debris removal; as well as people who lived, worked, or went to school in the exposure zone.   Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
Twenty Years After 9/11 Part One: A conversation about meaningful work with Jen Tosti-Kharas
Aug 30 2021
Twenty Years After 9/11 Part One: A conversation about meaningful work with Jen Tosti-Kharas
As the nation approaches the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the podcast features a multipart series that includes interviews with survivors of the terrorist attacks exploring the question, ‘What can the lives that were tragically lost during the 9/11 attacks still teach us about living and working meaningfully?’”This series includes conversations with Fred Price, an executive from investment firm Piper Sandler, which lost 66 people on 9/11; representatives of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, Jackie Zins and Stacy Pervall; and, with Jennifer Tosti-Kharas of Babson College, with whom Michaelson has collaborated on research about meaningful work.In part one of this series, Christopher Michaelson has a discussion with academic colleague and research collaborator, Jennifer Tosti-Kharas. Tosti-Kharas is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Babson College. She teaches organizational behavior and leadership in the undergraduate, graduate, and executive programs. Prior to joining Babson, she was an Assistant Professor of Management at San Francisco State University. Jen earned her Ph.D. in Management with an emphasis on Organizational Behavior from New York University's Stern School of Business, and her B.S. in Economics with concentrations in Management and Finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Jen's research explores career development, with a focus on meaningful work and work as a calling.Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.
Who is Capitalism? A conversation about Homeland Elegies with Ayad Akhtar and Azish Filabi
Aug 5 2021
Who is Capitalism? A conversation about Homeland Elegies with Ayad Akhtar and Azish Filabi
Work in Progress with Christopher Michaelson, discusses every working person’s work in progress, namely, our quest to be fully human in a working world that all too often makes us feel like machines, in which we often don’t even have time to think, and that, in the words of Studs Terkel, too often feels like “a Monday through Friday sort of dying.”Our third podcast episode airs with host Michaelson and two guests: Playwright, novelist, screenwriter, Pulitzer Prize winner, and the author of Homeland Elegies, Ayad Akhtar as well as the reviewer of Homeland Elegies, Associate Professor of Ethics and Executive Director of the Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics in Financial Services at The American College of Financial Services, Azish Filabi, JD.  Michaelson, Akhtar and Filabi discuss Akhtar's recent book, Homeland Elegies, exploring the role capitalism played - and continues to play - in simultaneously building and crushing lives in the name of the American dream. This book review has also been published in The Journal of Business Ethics (JBE) to answer two questions: "Is this book worth reading?" and "What ideas or questions will this book illuminate for anyone with interest in business ethics?" To advance dialogue between scholars and the public about business ethics and society, this review will be free to access at JBE for a period of 8 weeks, ending September 30, 2021.With special thanks for the support of the Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics in Financial Services at the American College of Financial Services and the Melrose & The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership at the University of St. Thomas Opus College of Business.Thanks for listening to Work in Progress with Christopher Wong Michaelson.