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Daniel Roebuck Interview (Ep 21-40)
Dec 2 2021
Daniel Roebuck Interview (Ep 21-40)
Daniel Roebuck stars as the voice of "Frankie" in our audio drama adaptation of Mark Wheatley’s acclaimed graphic novel FRANKENSTEIN MOBSTER. After a recording session at The Invisible Studios in Los Angeles, we found we had a little time left and started chatting about working together, filmmaker Larry Blamire, our careers in film, audio drama, and films and projects that we’re working on. Thanks to our LA audio engineer Charles Carroll for his great work on “Frankenstein Mobster”, and for rolling tape on our conversation! - Mark Redfield November 2021 ABOUT ACTOR DANIEL ROEBUCK Daniel Roebuck is a veteran actor who has worked in film and television since the 1980s, appearing on television shows such as "Matlock" (as Cliff Lewis) with Andy Griffith, "Nash Bridges" (as Rick Bettina), and "Lost" (as Dr. Arzt). He played Jay Leno in the acclaimed HBO movie "The Late Shift" and has guest starred on shows such as "Bones", "The King of Queens", "Glee" and "The Man in the High Castle". Film work includes a wide variety of roles, including US Marshal Bob Biggs in "The Fugitive" and "U.S. Marshals", with Tommy Lee Jones. Horror and fantasy films include "Bubba Ho-Tep", and five movies by Rob Zombie, including "The Devil's Rejects". I'm excited to be working with Dan again. We worked together in Larry Blamire's old dark house/murder mystery comedy movie "Dark and Stormy Night". And when I say "work together again", I don't just mean as a director. It's been all about monsters, mobsters, and....MUNSTERS for Dan recently! On Monday October 18th it was announced that Dan will play Grandpa Munster in Rob Zombie's upcoming film "The Munsters"! Congrats, Dan! You're going to be great! But meanwhile, let's clobber some gangsters and put-down some corrupt city officials in Monstros City in FRANKENSTEIN MOBSTER. To find out more about Dan’s current film work, please visit: more great audio, please visit:
MICKEY MOUSE THEATRE ON THE AIR! 1938 “Snow White Day” Radio Show! (Ep 21-38)
Nov 18 2021
MICKEY MOUSE THEATRE ON THE AIR! 1938 “Snow White Day” Radio Show! (Ep 21-38)
MICKEY MOUSE THEATRE ON THE AIR! 1938 “Snow White Day” Radio Show! November 18th marks the birthdays of Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse! November 18th was chosen as the anniversary date (by the late Disney historian and archivist Dave Smith) as that’s the date that “Steamboat Willie” (by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks) was released. It’s the first “talkie” Mickey Mouse cartoon from the Disney Brothers. But Minnie and Mickie made their actual screen debut in “Plane Crazy” on 15 May, 1928. After the success of the sound “Steamboat Willie”, “Plane Crazy” was scored and vocal and sound effects were added, and the short was re-released in 1929! And the first voice of Mickey Mouse in the films? Walt Disney! I always wondered why Mickey didn’t have his own radio show. He, and all the characters created by Disney and voiced by such wonderful voice talents would have been a natural. Particularly as music was so important to all of Disney’s films, and rapid fire dialogue, character voices, and verbal humor was king in the movies and radio of the 1930s, 40s and 50s. But Mickey and his friends were on the radio in the late 1930s. Perhaps radio, and Walt being primarily a visual storyteller, was just too much for the growing studio after they released their feature animated cartoon, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. Of course broadcasters we after Disney to do radio, and when the opportunity to help promote Snow White presented itself, Disney leapt at it, and put his all into it, like he did with everything. Mickey Mouse Theatre On the Air was a short lived variety radio program that debuted on NBC in January, 1938. Remarkably well produced and performed, it moves swiftly and packs the short program with great familiar characters and songs. It’s a shame that Mickey Mouse Theater on the Air only lasted until May of 1938, with only about 20 shows produced, broadcast every Sunday afternoon. There are so many wonderful possibilities for Mickey and friends on the radio…it could have been somewhat groundbreaking had it been given the chance, much like The Muppet Show was when it debuted on television in the 1970s… Here’s the second show, “Snow White Day”, originally broadcast on January 9th, 1938. With The Felix Mills Orchestra. Spike Jones conducting Donald Duck’s Swing Band. Clarence Nash as Donald Duck, Thelma Boardman as Minnie Mouse, Stuart Buchanan as Goofy, and the announcer is Joe Hiestand. Walt Disney appears as himself, and as Mickey Mouse! DON'T FORGET TO SUBSCRIBE! For more great audio visit:
Poe's Poetic Principle - Three Poems On The Death Of A Beautiful Woman (Ep 21-34)
Sep 22 2021
Poe's Poetic Principle - Three Poems On The Death Of A Beautiful Woman (Ep 21-34)
Poe's Poetic Principle - Three Poems On The Death Of A Beautiful Woman Find more great audio at www.RedfieldArtsAudio.com ______________ In “The Philosophy of Composition" , an 1846 essay written by Edgar Allan Poe , he gives his theory about how good writers write, when they write well. He concludes that length, "unity of effect" and a logical method are important considerations for good writing. He also states that "the death... of a beautiful woman is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world". Ulalume is a poem written by Poe in 1847. Much like Poe's poems The Raven and Annabel Lee, Ulalume focuses on the narrator's loss of his beloved due to her death. Poe originally wrote the poem as an elocution piece and, as such, the poem is known for its focus on sound. It makes many allusions, especially to mythology. The three central elements of Poe's philosophy of composition are: Length. Poe believed that all literary works should be short. They should be read in a single sitting. Method. Poe dismissed the notion of artistic intuition and argued that writing is methodical and analytical, not spontaneous. Unity of effect. The essay states Poe's conviction that a work of fiction should be written only after the author has decided how it is to end and which emotional response, or "effect", he wishes to create, commonly known as the "unity of effect". In this essay, Poe logically decides on "the death... of a beautiful woman" as it "is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world, and equally is it beyond doubt that the lips best suited for such topic are those of a bereaved lover." Biographers and critics have suggested that Poe's obsession with this theme stems from the repeated loss of women throughout his life, including his mother Eliza Poe, Jane Stanard, his foster mother Frances Allan and, later, his wife Virginia. In the essay, Poe traces the logical progression of his creation of "The Raven" as an attempt to compose "a poem that should suit at once the popular and the critical taste." Even the term "Nevermore," he says, is based on logic following the "unity of effect." The sounds in the vowels in particular, he writes, have more meaning than the definition of the word itself. He had previously used words like "Lenore" for the same effect. The Raven itself, Poe says, is meant to symbolize Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. This may imply an autobiographical significance to the poem, alluding to the many people in Poe's life who had died.
Drawing in the Dark at Baltimore Theatre Project (Ep 21-33)
Sep 8 2021
Drawing in the Dark at Baltimore Theatre Project (Ep 21-33)
Drawing in the Dark at Baltimore Theatre Project. On artist Micheal Iampieri, with John C. Wilson, Anne Cantler-Fulwiler, and Philip Arnoult. Artist Michael Iampieri drew during live performances of theatre, dance, and music for more than 30 years. John C. Wilson’s book, “Drawing in the Dark: The Art of Michael Iampieri” celebrates the legacy of Baltimore Theatre Project’s visual historian, and showcases nearly 300 of Michael’s drawings. Paired with essays by former Theatre Project Directors, “Drawing in the Dark” reveals the intimate relationship between performance and audience. With quick, mindful strokes of his pencil, Micheal captured the precision of movement, depth of emotion, and verve of dramatic performance. We present an audio recording of a panel discussion that was held at The Ivy Bookshop in Baltimore on Tuesday, August 10th, 2021. The speakers are author John C. Wilson, Theatre Project Board Member and Former Producing Director Anne Cantler-Fulwiler, and Theatre Project Founder Philip Arnoult. The moderator is Juanita Rockwell, writer and director, and founding director of Towson Univerity’s MFA in Theatre program. The event was held at the Ivy Bookshop’s spacious outdoor covered patio. A fierce thunder and rain storm moved in, but didn’t dissuade the large audience for attending the book-signing and panel discussion. The Baltimore Theatre Project is celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2021-2022. Founded in 1971 by Philip Arnoult, the theatre has been presenting theatre, music, dance, and performance art from around the world since its doors opened. Thank you for listening to our podcasts and for subscribing! To purchase a copy of “Drawing in the Dark: The Art of Micheal Iampieri” Visit: make a tax-deductible donation to Baltimore Theatre Project Visit: More Great Audio Visit: