PODCAST

Tales from Aztlantis

Kurly Tlapoyawa & Ruben Arellano Tlakatekatl

Join us every week as we explore Mesoamerican pseudohistory, new-age nonsense, archaeological misconceptions, and other tales of adventure! In each episode, we investigate how these very topics have helped inform Chicano/Chicana/Chicanx identity, and have resulted in a distorted view of our collective Indigenous past. Your hosts Kurly Tlapoyawa and Ruben Arellano Tlakatekatl invite you to join them on a fascinating journey through Mesoamerica's past, present, and future!

Premium Episode 6: Moorish Nationals and Indigenous erasure! (SAMPLE)Dispatches From Aztlantis: STOP erasing Chicanos and Mexican Americans!Episode 30: Cinco de Mayo!
For today's episode, we wanted to revisit one of our earlier episodes from the first season. Every year we see the return of hateful, anti-Mexican comments made in response to Cinco de Mayo, so we thought that it would be a topic worth coming back to. Enjoy!On a dark, rainy Monday afternoon on May 5th, 1862, Mexican soldiers led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, and bolstered by Indigenous fighters from Xochiapulco, sierra de Tetela, and other Nawa communities, defeated the French army of Napolean III at the Battle of Puebla. Today, Cinco de Mayo, the day of this battle, is generally viewed as a “drinking Holiday” by its American participants. Something that is welcome with open arms by brewing companies who capitalize on the day by encouraging white people to don sombreros, serapes, and tacky fake mustaches as they revel in their drunken debauchery. By the way, if this Is you – knock it off. Your embarrassing yourself.But, what is the actual history of Cinco de Mayo, what importance does it hold for Chicana/Chicano/Chicanx communities, and most importantly why is it celebrated in the United States?Well dear listener, If you have ever asked yourself any of those questions, you're in luck. Because on today's episode we explore:Cinco De Mayo: Why We CelebrateYour hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy) Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
May 3 2022
26 mins
Episode 29: Acequias - a Forgotten History!
The Acequia is a communal irrigation ditch, and its continued use is a testament to the cultural resiliency of the New Mexican people. But where does this tradition come from? Sadly, most New Mexicans have a distorted understanding of Acequia history and credit its creation solely to Moors and Spaniards. In this episode we dig a little deeper, and explore the Mesoamerican contributions to the Acequias of Mexico and New Mexico!"Tlalok San Ysidro" Available for download here: raquelzrivera.hearnow.comUsed with permission by the artists:Raquel Z. RiveraArnaldo AcostaFidel GonzálezCover Art: Artist’s impression of part of the canal network linking chinampas around Tenochtitlan by  Alberto Beltrán, found at Mexicolore.co.uk.Uppsala Map can be found at the World Digital Library https://www.wdl.org/en/item/503/Your hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy) Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Apr 27 2022
49 mins
Premium Episode 5 (SAMPLE)Episode 28: Aztlan Libre Press w/ Juan Tejeda
In this episode we are joined by Juan Tejeda, co-owner and publisher of Aztlan Libre Press. Aztlan Libre Press is an independent publishing company based out of Yanawana/San Antonio, Texas that is dedicated to the publication, promotion and free expression of XicanX literature and art. Established in 2009 by Juan Tejeda and Anisa Onofre, Aztlan Libre Press has published a dozen books and a line of XicanX Art Notecards. Purchase their books at https://squareup.com/store/aztlanlibrepress/. Juan Tejeda retired in 2016 as a professor of Mexican American Studies and Music from Palo Alto College in San Antonio, Texas. A musician, writer, arts administrator and Xicano activist, from 1976 to 1985 he was the jefe segundo of Xinachtli, the first traditional Mexica-Azteca Conchero dance group in Texas; and from 1980 to 1998 he was the Xicano Music Program Director at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center in San Antonio. He is the button accordionist and vocalist with the Conjunto Aztlan, and along with his wife, Anisa Onofre, is the co-owner and publisher of Aztlan Libre Press.Your hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Apr 12 2022
1 hr 9 mins
Premium Episode 4: Defending the Ancestors w/ Dr. Mario Garza!
A week ago, your hosts embarked on a trip to Central Texas to assist in the important work of repatriating ancestors and to conduct several interviews. In this special FREE Premium Episode, we are joined by Coahuiltecan elder Dr. Mario Garza to discuss Indigenous identity, Coahuiltecan history, and the vital importance of repatriation work.Dr. Mario Garza currently serves as board of elder’s chair and is the principal founder of the Indigenous Cultures Institute. He is also the Cultural Preservation Officer of the Miakan-Garza Band.  He earned a multi-disciplinary Ph.D. from Michigan State University in Social Science, with areas of concentration in Sociology, Political Science and Social Work. He has been active in graves protection and repatriation since 1991 participating in reburial ceremonies at the Comanche Cemetery in Fort Hood, Texas including two Coahuiltecan reburials. Dr. Garza served two tours of duty in Vietnam with the 1/616th Medical Clearing Company, 44th Medical Brigade, U. S. Army. He currently lives in San Marcos, Texas near the sacred springs that archeologists believe to be the oldest, continuously inhabited site in North America.Your Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Apr 5 2022
1 hr 14 mins
Episode 27: The Immaculate Deception Part 2!Episode 26: The Immaculate Deception Part 1
When Spanish forces under the command of Hernando Cortes first set foot on the eastern coast of Mexico on April 22, 1519, they christened the site of their landing Veracruz, “the true cross.”. Within five years of Cortes’ arrival, a group of Franciscan missionaries arrived in Mexico, tasked with converting the previously unknown indigenous people to Christianity. These missionaries brought with them a worldview forged in the apocalyptic and millenarian ideas that had become characteristic of Spanish Franciscanism. Driving this project of missionization was what J. L. Phelan described as “the millennial kingdom of the Franciscans in the New World.” In this episode, we explore the millennialist roots of these early Franciscan missionaries and argue that their apocalyptic beliefs not only influenced the emergent Mexican identity but directly resulted in what is easily Mexico’s most recognizable national symbol: the Virgin of Guadalupe.Your Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Mar 22 2022
42 mins
Episode 25: Peopling the Americas w/ Dr. Jennifer Raff!
Today we are joined by geneticist Dr. Jennifer Raff to talk about genetic research, what it can tell us about the peopling of the Americas, and how it can be misused by pseudohistorians and psudoarchaeologists to promote dangerous misinterpretations of the past!About our guest:Jennifer Raff is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Affiliate Faculty member of the Indigenous Studies Program at the University of Kansas. She has a PhD in Anthropology and Biology (double major) from Indiana University, and has been studying the genomes of ancient and contemporary Indigenous peoples from North America since 2001. Her book “Origin: A Genetic History of the Americas” is a New York Times Best seller.You can order her book here: Origin: A Genetic History of the AmericasYour Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Mar 15 2022
1 hr 30 mins
Premium Episode 3: The Mexika Calendar w/ Ruben Ochoa (Full Episode!)Episode 24: Forging Aztecness, Danza Azteca history with Kristina Nielsen
In this episode we are joined by Dr. Kristina Nielsen to discuss the history of the Danza Azteca and Mexikayotl traditions! About our guest:Kristina Nielsen received her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2017. Her research focuses on how music and dance in Aztec revitalization movements shape community histories and identities. Nielsen’s research is highly interdisciplinary and draws on ethnographic research methods, anthropology and area studies, particularly Indigenous and Latin American studies. Her current project examines Indigenous agency in the Mexican Folkloric Ballet’s staging of the Indigenous past. In addition to her ethnographic research, Nielsen has conducted interdisciplinary archaeomusicological research on Mesoamerican ceramic whistles and ocarinas with Christophe Helmke of the University of Copenhagen. She is currently in the process of writing a book that explores how Aztec dancers in Los Angeles navigate tradition, histories, and identities through music and dance.You can follow Dr. Nielsen's and other music scholars' work here: @music_textbookWorks Cited:Nielsen, Kristina F. “Composing Histories: The Transmission and Creation of Historicity, Music and Dance in the Los Angeles Danza Community.” PhD Diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 2017.———. “Forging Aztecness: Twentieth-Century Mexican Musical Nationalism in Twenty-First Century Los Angeles.” Yearbook for Traditional Music 52 (November 2020): 127–46. https://doi.org/10.1017/ytm.2020.18.———. “The Role of Interpretation in Determining Continuity in Danza Azteca History.” Ethnomusicology Review, May 17, 2014. https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/role-interpretation-determining-continuity-danza-azteca-history. Your Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Mar 1 2022
1 hr 31 mins
Premium Episode 2: Cesar Chavez & the Cult of Synanon (Sample)
Synanon was a drug rehabilitation program that morphed into a violent cult (and tax exempt church!) in the 1970s. Much of the violence by Synanon had been carried out by a group within Synanon called the "Imperial Marines". Over 80 violent acts were committed, including mass beatings that hospitalized teenagers and ranchers who were beaten in front of their families. So, what does the Synanon cult have to do with noted union organizer Cesar Chavez? Find out in this week's premium episode!Your Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Feb 22 2022
21 mins
Episode 23: Learning Nawatl w/ Yan Garcia
In this episode, Kurly is joined by Nawatl (Nahuatl) language educator Yan Garcia. Yan is the author of the book "Learn Nahuatl: Language of the Aztecs and Modern Nahuas" and a founding member of the organization Tlahtoltapazolli. Yan discusses how he got into Nawatl language education, the need for language preservation and revitalization, and how the Chicano community can learn Indigenous languages.Your Hosts:Kurly Tlapoyawa is an archaeologist, ethnohistorian, and filmmaker. His research covers Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and the historical connections between the two regions. He is the author of numerous books and has presented lectures at the University of New Mexico, Yale University, San Diego State University, and numerous others. He is currently a professor of Chicano Studies at the Colegio Chicano del Pueblo, a free online educational institution.@kurlytlapoyawaRuben Arellano Tlakatekatl is a scholar, activist, and professor of history. His research explores Chicana/Chicano indigeneity, Mexican indigenist nationalism, and Coahuiltecan identity resurgence. Other areas of research include Aztlan (US Southwest), Anawak (Mesoamerica), and Native North America. He has presented and published widely on these topics and has taught courses at various institutions. He currently teaches history at Dallas College – Mountain View Campus.@TlakatekatlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)Merch/ Premium Content / Join the Discord server: talesfromaztlantis.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hcarchy)
Feb 15 2022
54 mins
Premium Episode 1: Atlantis and Graham Hancock (Sample)Episode 22: The Four DisagreementsEpisode 21: Believe Native Women!Episode 12: The lost Episode of Aztlan!Bonus Mini-Cast #1: The Hispanic Population Myth!Episode 20: Nawatl Language Mistranslations!