Policy in Plainer English

Helen Labun

A project of the Bi-State Primary Care Association and the Vermont Food Access & Health Care Consortium. The current season connects the skills of food professionals and health professionals to look for ways to help shape our diet. Background music "Too Fly" by FesliyanStudios.com.

Season Four Finale
Feb 23 2022
Season Four Finale
A season finale. . . with special guests! Edward Phillips, MD, and Juna Gjata, creators of the podcast Food, We Need to Talk, join us to comment on common themes between the two series, and suggest what should be next in your food & health podcast listening line up. The  first season of Food, We Need to Talk is available online. Two episodes cited specifically in this conversation were: This Is Your Brain on Cheesecake and Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders. We also talked about what makes a "fad" diet and common characteristics of popular diets that don't support sustainable healthy eating strategies, covered in Doomed If You Diet, Doomed If You Don't. The problems with the good food / bad food mindset are explored in Good Food, Bad Food and also What the Heck Should We Eat? In this first season they do not go deep into diets tailored for treating or managing specific health conditions. But what will happen in the next season? We'll have to tune in March 21st to find out. . .  The podcast mentioned when I steal Steven Levitt's interview structure is People I Mostly Admire from Freakonomics Radio, which also has a health care podcast in its portfolio, Freakonomics, MD (Steve interviews the host on this 2021 episode).   You were promised links to microbiome-focused podcast episodes. There are a lot. It is literally a category of podcast unto itself.  A few options that are clear about both the interesting questions before us & the limits of the current science:BBC Good Food Health Podcast - Dr. Megan RossiStuff You Should Know - Your Gut Is Also a BrainWhat Went Wrong at uBiome Part 1 and Part 2 - The Journal (also a cautionary tale in what fraudulent medical billing looks like) Find easy links to this season's episodes in order here. And an extended playlist here. This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.
Building a Team
Feb 9 2022
Building a Team
This episode brings back previous guests and features a new interview with Christine Hamann, Director of the Teaching Kitchen Collaborative, to talk about cross training and collaboration. It continues our series of episodes that consider how to effectively introduce the food knowledge outlined in the first half of the season into a health care context. Christine references two conferences in this episode:Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives (next event is in February 2023)Teaching Kitchen Research Conference (next event is in October 2022)We feature clips from these previous episodes:Telehealth and Provider Consultations (Season Two)Food Access and Health Care Season Finale (Season Three)How to Cook (Season Four)Bonus Intro: Designing Better Health Systems (Season Four)Putting Appreciation Into Practice (Season Four)The podcast narrative also draws on background conversations I had with:The Maven Project (see also the VPQHC telehealth office hours they participated in last year for discussion of their work)Cara Feldman-Hunt - Integrative Health and Wellness Coaching CertificateStephanie Gall -  Vermont Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and UVM HN clinical nutritionFinally, if you want to learn more about the questions around nutrition education as part of medical training, the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation published a report in 2019, Doctoring Our Diet, and the proposed resolution referenced from Rep. McGovern is found here. Full season archive here. This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.  This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
Food as We Age
Jan 28 2022
Food as We Age
We talk with Chris Moldovan, RD, CD, FAND, and Director of Nutrition and Wellness at Age Well, an Area Agency on Aging in northwestern Vermont. Chris is also part of the Older Vermonters Nutrition Coalition. She provides examples of how our relationship with food and diet shifts with age, and explains how organizations like hers help people navigate changing requirements for nutrition.Some of the resources referenced in this episode:Medically Tailored Meals (episode from Season 3)National Meals on Wheels Organization - Health Care ConnectionsFood Is Medicine for Older Adults - December, 2021, Symposium SessionProfile of Hospital / Meals on Wheels Partnership for MTMsNutrition Requirements of Older Americans ActMore Details on Requirements of Older Americans Act2020 Report on Funding Adequacy for Older Americans Act Meals in Vermont Plus two book references:Ministry for the Future - and a New Yorker podcast interview with the authorThe Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith JonesFull season archive here. This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.  This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
How to Cook
Jan 11 2022
How to Cook
Professor Amy Trubek, and instructors John Corliss and Emily Barbour, join us to talk about core principles of the courses they are developing in the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont. Their curriculum combines sensory analysis with basic cooking skills to increase food agency. Some resources referenced in this episode:Food Agency Website - including a course in Culinary Nutrition that is offered to interested health professionals through UVM Continuing Education. The Google project on learning to make vegetables delicious. See also the Plant Forward Kitchen from the Culinary Institute of America. Careful listeners may have noticed that the oven frying Amy references sounds a lot like what an air fryer does. Episode Three of the last season of Nice Try, which explores the history of the crock-pot, is an interesting take on kitchen appliances that fits in well with our food agency conversation.  Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin Nosrat Children and Health Eating from Season Three. See also Vermont Food Education Every Day (VT FEED). Full season archive here. This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.  This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
Food Journals
Jan 5 2022
Food Journals
Writer Alexandra Johnson helps us get the new year off to a strong start. Among the things she writes about is the practice of journaling to support creativity. You know what we'll all need to put into practice food appreciation as a tool to become adaptable in our diets? Creativity. It's time to redefine how we think about food journals - these aren't the standard food logs of calories and serving sizes,  Alex is helping us define a different tool entirely.  No surprise, we referenced a lot of writing over the course of this conversation. Here are some links for additional reading:The Hidden Writer, Alexandra JohnsonLeaving a Trace, Alexandra JohnsonOn Keeping a Notebook by Joan Didion appears in Slouching Towards Bethlehem. Here is an article about the essay, with excerpts, from The Marginalian. 2022 Food Trends - with the coffee & climate change reference (see also a longer piece from October, here)Why I Switched to Eating Grandma's Food, Geeta Pandey in BBC NewsMelissa Clark on Wine-Braised Chicken in the New York TimesFor examples of prompting questions for finding flavor details, peruse this handout from my "Describing Flavor" craft seminar. It's from the Lesley University MFA program that I mentioned at the top of the episode. Sadly, the food samples that went with it were only available in-person. Do look for Alex's other work - we focused on only one aspect of it in this episode. Her essays, reviews, and travel pieces appear in national publications and anthologies, and her book in progress set in southern Italy is The Saint's Laundry.   Full season archive here. This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.  This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
A Pause to Think Bigger
Dec 27 2021
A Pause to Think Bigger
In a special year-end episode, we reverse directions. This season is about bringing skills from food professionals to bear on how we shape our individual diet, but what about moving the other way - from individuals to commercial scale production? The main lesson from this episode is to listen to the Mission ImPASTAble podcast series (thank you to the Sporkful for permission to use the clips we play).  You can find the series online.We also reference several previous Policy in Plainer English episodes, including Medically Tailored Meals and the Health Care Systems introduction to season four. For some of the reports also referenced in this episode:CDC statistics on eating patterns can be found in their Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys. The GAO report on federal efforts to address diet-related chronic health conditions. Editorial on the structure for supporting nutrition incentive programs. USDA overview of federal nutrition programs.Full season archive here. This podcast is part of the Food Access in Health Care program at Bi-State Primary Care Association.  This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.