Upon Reflection

Nick Byrd

A podcast about what we think as well as how and why we think it.

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Ep. 11 - Testing Implicit Bias (with Morgan Thompson)
Jun 1 2022
Ep. 11 - Testing Implicit Bias (with Morgan Thompson)
In this episode, I read my short paper with Morgan Thompson in WIRES Cognitive Science titled, "Testing for Implicit Bias: Values, Psychometrics, and Science Communication". You may have heard about implicit bias. It is measured by indirect rather than direct measures of bias. We reconstruct arguments from debates about these measures, reveal some instances of talking past one another, highlight how debate has changed, and highlight how the debate is laden with value judgments about psychometrics and science communication. As always, free preprints of my papers are available on my CV under "Publications". This podcast is sponsored by Homer. Homer is a learning program for kids delivered through devices like tablets. It covers reading, math, creativity, critical thinking, and even socio-emotional learning. Try a free trial or just learn more at the link in the podcast description (homer.i8epma.net/byrd). You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts Upon Reflection Podcast Ep. 1: What We Can Infer About Implicit Bias Implicit Bias & Philosophy Debiasing in Administration, Advising, & Teaching Implicit Bias | Part 3: Workplace Bias Implicit Bias | Part 4: Ten Debiasing Strategies
Ep. 11 - Testing Implicit Bias (with Morgan Thompson)
Jun 1 2022
Ep. 11 - Testing Implicit Bias (with Morgan Thompson)
In this episode, I read my short paper with Morgan Thompson in WIRES Cognitive Science titled, "Testing for Implicit Bias: Values, Psychometrics, and Science Communication". You may have heard about implicit bias. It is measured by indirect rather than direct measures of bias. We reconstruct arguments from debates about these measures, reveal some instances of talking past one another, highlight how debate has changed, and highlight how the debate is laden with value judgments about psychometrics and science communication. As always, free preprints of my papers are available on my CV under "Publications". This podcast is sponsored by Homer. Homer is a learning program for kids delivered through devices like tablets. It covers reading, math, creativity, critical thinking, and even socio-emotional learning. Try a free trial or just learn more at the link in the podcast description (homer.i8epma.net/byrd). You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts Upon Reflection Podcast Ep. 1: What We Can Infer About Implicit Bias Implicit Bias & Philosophy Debiasing in Administration, Advising, & Teaching Implicit Bias | Part 3: Workplace Bias Implicit Bias | Part 4: Ten Debiasing Strategies
Ep. 10 - Great Minds Do Not Think Alike
May 4 2022
Ep. 10 - Great Minds Do Not Think Alike
This time I read my 2022 paper in Review of Philosophy and Psychology titled, "Great Minds Do Not Think Alike: Philosophers' Views Predicted by Reflection, Education, Personality, and Other Demographic Differences". As the title suggests, various psychological factors predicted variance in philosophers' answers to classic philosophical questions. This raises questions about how psychological and demographic differences can explain philosophical differences. There are also implications for scientific psychologists as well as academic philosophers. As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This episode was sponsored by Pimsluer. Pimsleur claims to help you become conversational in another language quickly and effectively so that you can understand and be understood when speaking to someone in another language. Find out more at imp.i271380.net/byrd. You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts Domain-familiarity & The Cognitive Reflection TestPhilosophy As Proto-PsychologyMulti-disciplinary Philosophy PhD Programs9 Facts About People Who Study PhilosophyHow To Prepare For A Thesis Defense
Ep. 9 - Bounded Reflectivism & Epistemic Identity
Apr 6 2022
Ep. 9 - Bounded Reflectivism & Epistemic Identity
In this episode, I read one of my 2022 articles in Metaphilosophy titled, "Bounded Reflectivism & Epistemic Identity". Does reflective reasoning help or hinder our judgment? In this paper, I take a middle view between reflectivism and anti-reflectivism that I call bounded reflectivism. The idea is that reflection is a tool that can be used to improve our judgment or for other purposes (such as to defend the beliefs that we consider essential to our identity—a.k.a., our "epistemic identity"). As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This podcast was sponsored by Paying Green's Carbon Easy. Carbon Easy™ makes it easy for small and medium-sized businesses worldwide to reduce their carbon footprint in a measurable and publicly recognizable way. Find out how your company can meet its carbon goals at carboneasy.sjv.io/byrd. You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts What Is Reflective Reasoning?What good is reflective reasoning?On Whether Reflection Is A SkillOn Whether Reflection Is A VirtueUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 8: Reflective Reasoning & Philosophy
Ep. 6 - Your Health vs. My Liberty (Pandemic Psychology Research)
Jul 18 2021
Ep. 6 - Your Health vs. My Liberty (Pandemic Psychology Research)
Welcome to the latest episode of Upon Reflection. This time, I read my paper with Michał Białek, "Your health vs. my liberty: Philosophical beliefs dominated reflection and identifiable victim effects when predicting public health recommendation compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic" (Total N = 998). As the title suggests we found that complying with public health recommendations didn't depend on whether people received messaging about identifiable COVID-19 victims or statistical victims in flatten the curve graphs. Rather compliance increased the more that people endorsed an effective altruist principle about reducing harm and the more that they endorsed the truth of scientific theories, but compliance decreased as people valued liberty more than equality. Importantly, we also found that people were less likely to prevent the spread of disease by wearing masks and staying at home if the pandemic was equally deadly, but labeled as a "flu" pandemic—-mostly because they perceived this as less threatening to society. We think this suggests that people's life-threatening decisions to flout public health recommendations like mask-wearing and staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic was not just about ineffective messaging, but also about their prior philosophical commitments. As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This episode was sponsored by Pluralsight's courses in coding, design, cloud-based solutions, and more. You can find out more about Pluralsight and sign up for a free trial at pluralsight.pxf.io/byrd. You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts New paper: “Your Health vs. My Liberty”4 Free DIY Data Analysis & Statistics ToolsThe meaning of 'statistical significance' and of p-values15+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about Philosophy
Ep. 5 - Reflective Reasoning For Real People (Dissertation Defense Overview)
Aug 10 2020
Ep. 5 - Reflective Reasoning For Real People (Dissertation Defense Overview)
Welcome to Upon Reflection. In this episode, I review the major take-aways and findings from my dissertation titled, "Reflective Reasoning For Real People". I explain what cognitive scientists mean by terms like "reflective reasoning", how reflection is measured empirically, how reflection can either help or hinder our reasoning, how more reflective philosophers tend toward certain philosophical beliefs, and how reflection may help us retrain our implicit biases. The recording is from my remote dissertation defense on May 29, 2020. You can find video of this dissertation overview (complete with the slideshow) below or on my YouTube Channel. the chapters of the dissertation are accepted for publication in academic journals, the free preprints will become available on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This podcast is brought to you by the scientists who put up with philosophers like me and the philosophers who put up with scientists like me. Long live natural philosophy. More seriously, if you want to support the podcast, my ongoing research, or my other projects, then you can do so at byrdnick.com/support. You can subscribe wherever you find podcasts and you can find out more about me at byrdnick.com, on Twitter (@byrd_nick), or on Facebook (@byrdnick). Comments and questions can be submitted at byrdnick.com/contact. And, of course, if you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your review. Related A Dissertation About Reflective Reasoning in Philosophy, Morality, & BiasDebiasing in Administration, Advising, & TeachingIs post-fact reasoning redeemable?Fact-checking is not enough: We need argument-checkingThe Base Rate Fallacy