Precinct 444: The National Law Enforcement Museum Podcast

National Law Enforcement Museum

Over a decade of planning and persistence in the making, the National Law Enforcement Museum has opened its doors to the public. Finally, citizens and law enforcement professionals from diverse perspectives and backgrounds will have a place to share in the vibrant story of American law enforcement. Within the walls of the Museum’s strikingly contemporary exterior, artifacts from our collection of more than 25,000 objects tell the story of American law enforcement – past, present, and future – and engage visitors of all ages in memorable, immersive and experiential exhibits. More importantly, we’re proud that the Museum will serve as a platform for constructive dialogue to help strengthen relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve. We invite all listeners to follow us and submit questions for upcoming episodes!

For questions or inquiries about the show: Precinct444@nleomf.org

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Season 7

Season 6

Encore | Operation Shadow Game: How the DEA Broke the Tijuana Cartel, Part 2
Dec 6 2023
Encore | Operation Shadow Game: How the DEA Broke the Tijuana Cartel, Part 2
For over 14 months, the DEA tracked a fishing boat belonging to the kingpin of the Tijuana Cartel. The boat, named the “Dock Holiday,” was often sailed off the Mexican coast until finally, in August of 2006, the boat sailed into international waters and was intercepted by the United States Coast Guard. The kingpin was captured and DEA agents were able to take down one of Mexico’s most notorious drug cartels. The surveillance of the boat was part of an investigation of the Tijuana Cartel known as “Operation Shadow Game.”  On display at the museum, you can see a life ring from the Dock Holiday, which is on loan from the DEA’s collection, in the History Time Capsule exhibit. Originally hosted in 2016, the National Law Enforcement Museum hosted a program titled “Operation Shadow Game” which discussed the investigation of the Tijuana Cartel with DEA Agents and members of the California Department of Justice who collaborated on the investigation.Part 2 of this series starts with a look into the local gangs of San Diego and how they were central to the Tijuana Cartel's movements and success. One agent also talks about the importance of developing a relationship with Mexican law enforcement officials, since the United States had no jurisdiction and could not make arrests without their assistance. Lastly, the agents cover one of the biggest hurdles of the investigation: corruption in Mexico and difficult it was to overcome and out maneuver. The third and final part will air next Wednesday, December 13th. Featuring:Opening RemarksCraig Floyd, Former CEO of the NLEOMF ModeratorDr. Nathan Jones, Associate Professor, Sam Houston State UniversityPanelists:Juan Martinez, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationAl Hargrove, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationManuel Castañón, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationSteve Duncan, California Department of Justicehttps://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Encore | Operation Shadow Game: How the DEA Broke the Tijuana Cartel, Part 3
Dec 13 2023
Encore | Operation Shadow Game: How the DEA Broke the Tijuana Cartel, Part 3
For over 14 months, the DEA tracked a fishing boat belonging to the kingpin of the Tijuana Cartel. The boat, named the “Dock Holiday,” was often sailed off the Mexican coast until finally, in August of 2006, the boat sailed into international waters and was intercepted by the United States Coast Guard. The kingpin was captured and DEA agents were able to take down one of Mexico’s most notorious drug cartels. The surveillance of the boat was part of an investigation of the Tijuana Cartel known as “Operation Shadow Game.”  On display at the museum, you can see a life ring from the Dock Holiday, which is on loan from the DEA’s collection, in the History Time Capsule exhibit. Originally hosted in 2016, the National Law Enforcement Museum hosted a program titled “Operation Shadow Game” which discussed the investigation of the Tijuana Cartel with DEA Agents and members of the California Department of Justice who collaborated on the investigation.Part 3 concludes this series and begins with the background of an earlier investigation called “Operation United Eagles”, which focused on specific targets designated as Consolidated Priority Organization Targets or CPOT, a multi-agency list of some of the most prolific individuals involved in drug smuggling organizations. Following this discussion, is a Q&A with the live audience from the program.Next Wednesday, December 20th, we have special guest, Andrew Whiting, the Senior Vice President and Chief Sales Officer with MissionSquare Financial, the exclusive sponsor of the Memorial Fund’s Ambassador programs, sits down to talk about the importance of financial planning as it pertains to those in public service. Featuring:Opening RemarksCraig Floyd, Former CEO of the NLEOMF ModeratorDr. Nathan Jones, Associate Professor, Sam Houston State UniversityPanelists:Juan Martinez, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationAl Hargrove, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationManuel Castañón, Special Agent, Drug Enforcement AdministrationSteve Duncan, California Department of Justicehttps://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Encore | Eye on Policing: How Body Cameras Change Law Enforcement
Jan 3 2024
Encore | Eye on Policing: How Body Cameras Change Law Enforcement
The National Law Enforcement Museum hosted a panel discussion concerning the implementation of body warn cameras by law enforcement. Each panelist began by sharing their involvement with body worn cameras, touching on issues of pilot program implementation, getting community input, and creating and analyzing policies for body camera programs. Panelists also explained how they worked to get communities on board with the idea of body cameras. Lt. Grenon shared how, in Seattle, they provided room in their policy for officers to be able to flag certain elements of video in the metadata that might not be appropriate for public disclosure. Commander Jones told of a debate that came up in Montgomery County about whether or not it was appropriate for School Resource Officers to use cameras when engaging with students, and that privacy concerns of domestic violence and sexual assault victims was a common concern. The question of disclosure emerged as one of the primary concerns and challenges of body camera programs. Mr. Stanley explained what the ACLU sees as the ideal: “We don’t want to see extremes on either end of the spectrum…we don’t think that’s the right balance between transparency and disclosure.” According to Mr. Stanley, certain types of videos should be flagged and made publicly available, but routine video need not be held in perpetuity.Tune into this revisit in its entirety and see how a program from several years is still very much relevant to today's law enforcement.Thanks for listening!Featuring:ModeratorLindsay Miller Goodison, Senior Research Associate, Police Executive Research ForumPanelistsMarcus Jones, Third District Commander for the Montgomery County (MD) Police DepartmentJay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union’s (ACLU) Speech, Privacy, and Technology ProjectBryan Grenon of the Seattle (WA) Police DepartmentMichael White, Professor of the Arizona State University (ASU) School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and Associate Director of ASU’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safetyhttps://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Law & Disorder | A Conversation About "A Fallen Star"
Jan 17 2024
Law & Disorder | A Conversation About "A Fallen Star"
Law and Disorder features true crime stories, investigative techniques, forensics, and the people responsible for solving difficult crimes. On this special episode, Anna Muckenfuss sits down with Lori-Suzanne Dell, the author of "A Fallen Star", and Sheriff Kevin Joyce, of the Cumberland County (ME) Sheriff's Office, to discuss the case of Deputy Ebenezer Parker.Deputy Parker served with the Cumberland County Sheriff's Office in the early 19th century and performed many of the same duties that sheriffs do today. On the evening of January 11, 1808, Deputy Parker was tasked with enforcing an outstanding debt to a person who publicly refused to go quietly. As a result of doing his duty, he was brutally assaulted and remained in a coma for a week before succumbing to his injuries on January 18th.The significance of this case is that Deputy Parker is known to be the first officer to die in the line of duty in the New England area, yet his final resting place has not been determined. In addition to telling his life story and family genealogy, Lori-Suzanne and Sheriff Joyce discuss the difficulties of this 200-year-old case and all the nuances involved.We hope in addition to listening to the results of all their hard work, that you'll consider purchasing "A Fallen Star" to learn even more about all the fascinating results Lori-Suzanne discovered over many years of research."A Fallen Star" by Lori-Suzanne Dell is available for purchase at most major bookstores and online retailers. From "A Fallen Star":"On April 25th of 2002, Maine Department of Public Safety Deputy Commissioner John Rogers wrote a memorandum to then Cumberland County Sheriff Mark Dion requesting that his department locate the graves of any of the department’s fallen officers for recognition in the Maine Law Enforcement Memorial annual remembrance, as required by Maine law. This seemingly simple request unwittingly sparked a nearly two-decades-long search for the final resting place of Maine’s first fallen law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty, Cumberland County Deputy Sheriff Ebenezer Parker."An update from Sheriff Joyce:"Last fall we received information that in the area described by Lori-Suzanne Dell as the "lost Parker lot" of the cemetery, there is indication of items that resemble buried headstones about 6 inches underground. In fact, there are several pieces of artifact, which yield credibility to the fact that Lori-Suzanne Dell could not account for 9 members of the Parker family for that era.I am now working with a retired Maine Game Warden, who is now an archaeologist, to possibly probe and excavate the potential headstones in hopes of finding the inscription of Ebenezers name and date of birth on the stones. We hope to do that in early spring. That will give us 100% certainty of Deputy Parker being buried in the cemetery. If we don't find an inscribed headstone in that area, then we will be back to not being 100% sure of the area being Ebenezer's gravesite."Stay tuned for a follow-up of this episode, as Sheriff Joyce awaits the results of ground penetrating radar in spring 2024!Featuring:Lori-Suzanne Dell, Historian and Author, "A Fallen Star"Sheriff Kevin Joyce, Cumberland County Sheriff's Officehttps://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Encore | The Female Force: Empowering Women in Law Enforcement
Mar 13 2024
Encore | The Female Force: Empowering Women in Law Enforcement
The National Law Enforcement Museum and the National Organization of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE) worked together to provide this live virtual discussion focusing on empowering women in law enforcement.Women constitute less than 13% of total officers in this country—with an even smaller proportion of leadership positions—despite comprising over 50% of the total US population. Despite recent efforts to increase representation, the percentage of women in law enforcement has remained stagnant for the past few decades.How do women contribute in ways that differ from their male colleagues? What strengths do women bring to the field? How do they impact the safety of officers and the communities they serve? These questions and others were discussed during this live program, moderated by Kathy O’Toole.Museum Public Programs - www.nleomf.org/museum/public-programs/Upcoming Women's History Month Program on March 22nd- Walking the Same Beat: The First Patrol of Women OfficersResources:National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives – https://nawlee.org/Women in Policing Resources, IACP https://www.theiacp.org/women-in-policing-resources#:~:text=The%20Women’s%20Leadership%20Institute%20(WLI,groups%2C%20and%20achieve%20organizational%20goals.International Association of Women Police https://www.iawp.org/Featuring:WelcomePaula Balafas, President, National Association of Women Law Enforcement ExecutivesModeratorKathy O’Toole, First female commissioner of the Boston (MA) Police Department, first Chief Inspector of the Garda Inspectorate, and Chief of the Seattle (WA) Police Department from 2014 to 2017.Panelists:Chief Gina Hawkins, Fayetteville (NC) Police DepartmentChief Roxana Kennedy, Chula Vista (CA) Police DepartmentSheriff Rosie Rivera, Salt Lake County (UT) Sheriff’s OfficeSonya K. Chavez, U.S. Marshals Service (NM)Chief Jill Lees, IUPD-Bloomington (IN)https://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/

Season 5

Encore | Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Part 1
Oct 4 2023
Encore | Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Part 1
In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the role of police has expanded to include the enforcement of public-health safety regulations in congruence with local, state, and federal law. With citizens of their jurisdictions eager to escape quarantine and return to normal life, this has been a challenge.The tragedy and scope of COVID-19 has shown its face in astronomical death tolls and extreme personal sacrifice, with the weight of the pandemic falling hardest on minority communities – specifically on those of Black and Latino Americans. While members of these communities are becoming infected and dying of COVID-19 at higher rates than others, they are also finding themselves in more contact with local law enforcement because of social distancing and additional pandemic-related regulations.This panel will discuss the challenges of enforcing coronavirus regulations, the impact it has had across different communities, and how that has affected initiatives focused on more equitable policing.Part 1 of this series begins with opening remarks from former CEO Marcia Ferranto and keynote speaker, former Boston (MA) Police Department Commissioner, Ed Davis. Following their remarks, Ganesha Martin, the program’s moderator, poses the first question and topic that arose during the earlier days of the Coronavirus pandemic: Defunding the police. Listen in to this three-part series, as we revisit Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic program from September 2020.Moderator:Ms. Ganesha Martin, President, G.M.M. ConsultingKeynote Speaker:Ed Davis, Former Boston (MA) Police Department CommissionerPanelists:·       Judge Ernest F. Hart, Deputy Commissioner of Legal Matters, New York (NY) Police Department·       Eric Adams, President, Brooklyn (NY) Borough·       Wendy Calaway, Professor, University of Cincinnati, OH·       Officer James Sobota, Houston (TX) Police Department·       Chief Brad Wells, Wood River (IL) Police Departmenthttps://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Encore | Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Part 2
Oct 11 2023
Encore | Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Part 2
In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the role of police has expanded to include the enforcement of public-health safety regulations in congruence with local, state, and federal law. With citizens of their jurisdictions eager to escape quarantine and return to normal life, this has been a challenge.The tragedy and scope of COVID-19 has shown its face in astronomical death tolls and extreme personal sacrifice, with the weight of the pandemic falling hardest on minority communities – specifically on those of Black and Latino Americans. While members of these communities are becoming infected and dying of COVID-19 at higher rates than others, they are also finding themselves in more contact with local law enforcement because of social distancing and additional pandemic-related regulations.This panel will discuss the challenges of enforcing coronavirus regulations, the impact it has had across different communities, and how that has affected initiatives focused on more equitable policing.Part 2 of this series begins with a question posed from the program moderator, Ganesha Martin, about community policing, the importance of engaging with the public and building relationships, and how should law enforcement attempt to improve already strained relationships within certain communities.Listen in to this three-part series as we revisit Equitable Policing During the Coronavirus Pandemic program from September 2020.Moderator:Ms. Ganesha Martin, President, G.M.M. ConsultingKeynote Speaker:Ed Davis, Former Boston (MA) Police Department CommissionerPanelists:Judge Ernest F. Hart, Deputy Commissioner of Legal Matters, New York (NY) Police DepartmentEric Adams, President, Brooklyn (NY) BoroughWendy Calaway, Professor, University of Cincinnati, OHOfficer James Sobota, Houston (TX) Police DepartmentChief Brad Wells, Wood River (IL) Police Department https://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/
Lifeline | Tom Weitzel: Surviving and Thriving After an Armed Encounter
Oct 18 2023
Lifeline | Tom Weitzel: Surviving and Thriving After an Armed Encounter
On today's episode of Lifeline, we welcomed retired chief of police Tom Weitzel into the studio to share his law enforcement story. His passion for the field led him down a career path of more than 30 years. In 1987 Tom was awarded the Kevlar/DuPont Survivor’s Club Award for having survived an armed encounter. He returned to work and with the support of his wife had a thriving career. He would rise through the ranks and attain the position of Chief of Police for Riverside, Illinois, a position he would hold for thirteen years before retiring in 2020. He spent some his time pushing for laws that would invoke positive change in not only his community but throughout the country. Tom has graciously provided the original dispatch recording the night of that fateful incident, which has never before been released to the public. Read a little about that incident below:Officer Tom Weitzel had just three years on with the Riverside Police Department, and by some standards could still be considered a rookie. At 3 AM that morning he found himself riding in a “single” patrol car. While patrolling the 2 square mile community Tom noticed a vehicle parked along the curb outside a residential home. Pulling behind the vehicle, he used his spotlight to light the inside of the car. The tinted windows were so dark, he recalls, that the spotlight could not penetrate the car’s interior. Stepping from his police car, Tom was unaware that a decision made three years earlier was about to save his life.He had made it as far as his front bumper when a figure, in the backseat of the car, rolled out the door. Two popped up from the bushes. Tom heard the unmistakable sound of a shotgun round being chambered.Listen to this week's episode, hosted by Matt Garcia, Project Manager for the Officer Safety and Wellness department at the NLEOMF, for the full harrowing experience and what kind of support was and still is, absolutely necessary following a critical incident in law enforcement. Tom Weitzel is a proud member of the Ambassador Program, which is a year-round commitment to serving as a local NLEOMF liaison to law enforcement agencies by providing training and technical assistance to officers as well as attending events as a representative of the organization.All active and retired law enforcement officers are encouraged to apply. Learn more about the program and register here.The National Law Enforcement Officers Ambassador Program would not be possible without the generous support of MissionSquare Retirement.https://nleomf.org/museum/precinct-444/