Movement Logic: Strong Opinions, Loosely Held

Dr. Sarah Court, PT, DPT and Laurel Beversdorf

Welcome to the Movement Logic Podcast, with yoga teacher and strength coach Laurel Beversdorf, and physical therapist Dr. Sarah Court. With over 30 years combined experience in the yoga, movement and physical therapy worlds, we believe in strong ideas, loosely held – which means we’re not hyping outdated movement concepts. Instead, we’re here with up-to-date and cutting-edge tools, evidence and ideas to help you as a mover and a teacher. Music: Makani by Scandinavianz & AXM read less
Health & FitnessHealth & Fitness

Episodes

Episode 69: Crack is Whack - Adam Meakins and A Modern Approach to Manual Therapy
Jun 12 2024
Episode 69: Crack is Whack - Adam Meakins and A Modern Approach to Manual Therapy
Welcome to Episode 69 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel and Sarah are joined by Adam Meakins, also known as The Sports Physio, to discuss his recent co-authored paper, “A modern way to teach and practice manual therapy.” Adam highlights the major issues in current manual therapy practice and education, as detailed in this extensively cited paper, which draws on decades of research. He also outlines what a modern, evidence-based approach to manual therapy could look like.In this episode you will learn:The distinction between clinician-centered and patient-centered care.How traditional manual therapy relies on pathoanatomical reasoning and what research reveals about its reliability and validity.The potential harms of traditional manual therapy, including the propagation of harmful, fragilizing, and disempowering narratives about the body.Why manual therapy treatments cannot precisely target individual joints and tissues, nor produce specific outcomes for those areas.How human biases, such as appeal to authority, sunk cost fallacies, cognitive dissonance, and big egos, hinder the evolution of beliefs and practices in manual therapy.Predictions for the future of manual therapy.And more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024! It’s the only place you’ll get a discount on the course plus fun free bonus content along the way.References:Laurel and Sarah’s interview on the Conspirituality Podcast - Episode 205: Dismantling Movement DogmaEpisode 62: Make McGill Make SenseEpisode 3: Massage MistruthsAdam Meakins’ publication - A modern way to teach and practice manual therapyAdam Meakins’ website
Episode 68: Promoting Movement Optimism
May 29 2024
Episode 68: Promoting Movement Optimism
Welcome to Episode 68 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Sarah is joined by soon to be Doctor of Physical Therapy Adam McAtee, founder of Evidence-Based Pilates, a continuing education platform for Pilates instructors. Sarah and Adam discuss long and lean, whether Pilates can contribute to bone density improvement, and why the hundred is Sarah’s least favorite one.In this episode you will learn:Common myths often heard from clients and instructors alike about Pilates, including using lighter springs to strengthen smaller musclesWhy Pilates instructors confuse aesthetics and functionality and how freeing it can be to let them goHow the variety of Pilates styles now available is a positive, not a negativeThe relationship of Contrology to modern day PilatesWhy it’s not that useful to your students and clients to name where all of your exercises come fromThe difference between instructor-centered care and client-centered careThe importance of meeting clients where they are, even if you’re uncomfortableWhat heavy load could look like on a reformer instead of the typical endurance based exercisesIf anyone can make accurate claims about what the Hundred is forHow any Pilates exercise might be useful for one particular populationAnd more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024! It’s the only place you’ll get a discount on the course plus fun free bonus content along the way.References:Evidence-Based PilatesEffectiveness of yoga and Pilates to improve bone density in adult women: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Episode 67: Popular Explanations for SI Joint Pain are Wrong, Says Science
May 15 2024
Episode 67: Popular Explanations for SI Joint Pain are Wrong, Says Science
Welcome to Episode 67 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel and Sarah discuss what current science, versus outdated advice and conventional wisdom, have to say about the causes and solutions for sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain. Learn what research says about whether or not the SIJ is an inherently robust or fragile structure, whether things like lots of stretching in yoga or joint laxity during pregnancy contribute to its instability, and what therapists can and cannot reliably know about the causes of SIJ pain.You will learn:The anatomy and biomechanics of the SIJ.How Sarah differentiates between low back pain and SIJ pain with her patients.What joint incongruency is and what therapists can and cannot know about joints through palpation.What amount of force is required to dislocate the SIJ.What SIJ form and force closure are, and how they are used to explain SIJ pain.Some common explanations, assessments, and treatments for SIJ pain that lack evidence.Why muscle testing is an unreliable way to assess muscle strength or weakness.The problem with muscle imbalance theories.How upper and lower cross syndrome theories —the idea that muscles can be “locked short” and “locked long”— has since been replaced by more contemporary research.What evidence-based tools we have to address SIJ pain.And more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024! It’s the only place you’ll get a discount on the course.Episode 21: Is the SI Joint Painful Due to Instability?Evidence-Based Diagnosis and Treatment of the Painful Sacroiliac JointThe sacroiliac joint – Victim or culpritA radiostereometric analysis of movements of the sacroiliac joints during the standingClinical tests of the sacroiliac joint.Effects of mobilization treatment on sacroiliac joint dysfunctionAssociation between the serum levels of relaxin and responses to the active straight leg raiseHigh-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation (HVLA) does not alter three-dimensional position of sacroiliac jointEffects of mobilization treatment on sacroiliac joint dysfunction syndrome
Episode 66: Dismantling Long and Lean Pt. 3
May 1 2024
Episode 66: Dismantling Long and Lean Pt. 3
Welcome to Episode 66 of the Movement Logic podcast! This episode is Part 3 of our Dismantling Long and Lean series. In this episode, Sarah and Laurel discuss the origins of Pilates, Barre, and yoga, and the connections between each movement method’s origins and the concept of a Pilates body, a Barre body, and a yoga body.In this episode you will learn:The Pilates origin story, including its clear cut relationship to ballet and the ‘dancer body’The problematic origin of the dancer body in the 1960s in New York and its influence on Pilates and barreThe Barre origin story and the Lotte Berk MethodHow Lotte Berk’s approach was sanitized for future iterationsWhether the teacher and the teachings can be separatedLaurel and Sarah’s experiences with the yoga body in their teacher trainingsSome essential differences between the yoga body and the Pilates or Barre bodyWhat we can all do going forward to dismantle this patriarchal dominance over womens’ bodiesAnd more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024! It’s the only place you’ll get a discount on the course plus fun free bonus content along the way.Reference Links:Maintenance Phase: Pilates episode1962 Sports Illustrated articleThe Predatory Genius: what do we do when great artists are also moral monstersPilates Anytime: What is a Pilates body?Lotte Berk WebsiteGX United: The down and dirty history of barre fitnessNY Times: From Shimmying to Standing on Your HeadThe Cut: The Secret Sexual History of the Barre WorkoutDance Magazine: The Cult of Thin
Episode 65: How to Exercise Safely When You're Injured
Apr 17 2024
Episode 65: How to Exercise Safely When You're Injured
Welcome to Episode 65 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Sarah is delving into the topic of exercising while injured. Should you? Shouldn’t you? How do you know when, how much, and what kind to do?She takes you through a decision making strategy that will make this an easier question to tackle next time you are injured. Sarah also made a PDF Injury Decision Tree that you will receive as bonus content if you sign up for the 2024 Bone Density Course Wait List!Caveat: This episode is not medical advice and should not be taken as such.In this episode you will learn:Acute vs Chronic injuries - what’s the difference when it comes to exerciseHow different types of injury will impact your movement choicesYour body’s mechanism of injury response at a tissue healing levelThe tissue healing timeline and what can speed it up or slow it downThe role pain plays in injury and how it’s not a 1:1 ratio of injury to painSituations where the best option actually is to restWhat types of exercise are best depending on your level of injuryRed flags to keep an eye out for that would require medical interventionAnd more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024! It’s the only place you’ll get a discount on the course. You’ll also get the PDF Injury Decision Tree in a future email to the list.Reference links:Episode 1: Movement vs Exercise vs SportEpisode 30: Mastering Physical Literacy with Dr. Chris Raynor, MDEpisode 62: Make McGill Make Sense
Episode 64: Non-Diet Coaching & Silly Certification Tests with Damali Fraiser
Apr 3 2024
Episode 64: Non-Diet Coaching & Silly Certification Tests with Damali Fraiser
Welcome to Episode 64 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel is joined by non-diet kettlebell coach Damali Fraiser to talk about what it means to be an inclusive kettlebell coach. We also discuss why a coach's life experience and skills (and not their body) are their real business card. Finally, we get into silly certification tests that limit diversity in an industry that desperately needs more of it.In this interview you will learn:Why kettlebells are excellent tools for cultivating strength, power, and endurance.How the shape of a kettlebell makes it uniquely effective for training stability and moving in multi-planar ways.What it means to be a non-diet kettlebell coach.What building body trust means, and how grasping at some ideal, future body can sabotage some people’s ability to relate to and trust the body they currently have.What intersectionality is, and how understanding this concept can help us teach and coach in a way that is inclusive so that more people feel welcome in fitness.A critical look at a popular kettlebell certification system, StrongFirst, and a test they impose as a barrier to entry for certifying coaches—the 100 kettlebell snatches in 5 minutes test.How the fitness industrial complex negatively impacts folks who don’t conform to societal ideals and what we can do about it.And more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024!Reference links:Damali Fraiser's website
Episode 63: Dismantling Long and Lean Part 2
Mar 20 2024
Episode 63: Dismantling Long and Lean Part 2
Welcome to Season 4 and Episode 63 of the Movement Logic podcast! This is part 2 of a much requested series titled Dismantling Long & Lean. In part 2, Laurel and Sarah discuss the phrase "long and lean" from a science-based, as well as sociological and racial perspective. They cover whether or not you can actually make anyone’s body “longer” and/or “leaner” through formats like Pilates and barre. Additionally, they unpack the harm that appealing to this narrowly, aesthetically-idealized body shape has on students and teachers. You will learn:Common code words used to show preference for thinness in exercise.Is there a way to make limbs or muscles longer?How do we change the shape of muscles?Can we make muscles tone without making them bulky?How hypertrophy   works and whether or not Pilates or barre are particularly effective for building muscle.What does it mean to be bulky versus lean?The constrained energy model for metabolism and how it explains why exercise is a poor tool for weight loss and why it’s more complex than calories in and calories out.How human metabolism is a product of evolution, not engineering and more like a business on a budget rather than a car that runs on fuel.How the science of metabolism explains why exercise is so important for long term health and longevity.Whether building muscle makes you burn more calories at rest.That fast and slow metabolism doesn’t mean what people think it does.Whether or not you can burn fat specifically from “problem areas” on your body.How the transatlantic slave trade and the rise of Protestantism influenced the way we think about fatness and thinness.How fatphobia and a preference for thinness has been used to craft and reinforce racial, sexual, and socioeconomic hierarchies over the centuries.Why “long and lean” is to the 1990s and 2000s as “white and nordic” was to the 1800s and 1900s.Why using "long and lean" as a marketing ploy does harm to the teaching profession of Pilates and barre. And more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024!Reference links:Episode 60: Dismantling Long & Lean Pt. 1Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories…Episode 43: Nutrition Facts vs. Fiction with Dr. Ben House, PhDFearing the Black Body…
Episode 61: Putting Conditioning Back Into Strength & Conditioning
Feb 21 2024
Episode 61: Putting Conditioning Back Into Strength & Conditioning
Welcome to Season 4, Episode 61 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel explores whether strength training alone suffices for health and longevity. She compares training stress, intensity, and adaptations of strength training versus high intensity interval training (HIIT) versus cardiorespiratory endurance training. Discover how both HIIT and cardio are forms of conditioning, and why both strength and conditioning are necessary "weekly human maintenance habits" for preventing chronic disease and promoting longevity.Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024!You will also learn:What counts as exercise?Does HIIT promote strength or cardiorespiratory endurance or both?What is aerobic versus anaerobic conditioning?What role does cardiorespiratory fitness play in our strength gains and what role does strength play in our cardiorespiratory fitness gains?How strength training, HIIT, and cardio compare when considering the following: typical length of a session, work to rest ratios, relative intensities, common limitations to performance, and the specific adaptations each promotes.Is strength enough for health and longevity?Is walking conditioning?Can the fatigue cost of HIIT interfere with our ability to exercise enough throughout the week?What should we pay attention to specifically if we want to build strength with HIIT?What’s the best way to structure weekly strength and conditioning workouts, specifically when we want to do both on the same day?Reference links:Episode 6: How Much ‘Should” You ExerciseCDC guidelines on exerciseTalk testHigh-intensity interval training for health benefits…Episode 37: Plyometrics—Get More Bang For Your BonesEpisode 46: How Often Should You Strength Trainlll?Episode 32: Load & Volume…Episode 9: What Are The Best Exercises for Strength?Episode 23: Do We Really Need 10,000 Steps…?
Episode 60: Dismantling Long and Lean Part 1
Feb 7 2024
Episode 60: Dismantling Long and Lean Part 1
Welcome to Season 4 and Episode 60 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this much requested first part of a three-part episode series, Laurel and Sarah discuss the phrase long and lean from a historical and sociological perspective. They cover the idealized image of women through art with a historical gaze, then unpick the narrative around becoming long and lean, how diet and exercise became front and center for this impossible ideal, and where we are today with social media, photoshop, and AI in the mix.You will learn:How bad Medieval artists were at drawing human bodiesHow the Renaissance ideal form was the exact opposite of long and lean“Ideal” female forms through the 20th and 21st centuriesThe inherent misogyny, internalized anxiety, and social pressure of long and leanWhether the diet and exercise boom of the 1980s had anything to do with healthWhy GOOP is indeed a four letter wordHow ‘problem areas’ keep us busy objectifying our bodies and how this is a feature of our modern capitalist societyAnd more!Sign up here to get on the Wait List for our next Bone Density Course in October 2024!Reference links:The Toast Looks Back: The Best Of Two MonksMet Museumhttps://greatist.com/grow/100-years-womens-body-image#1https://www.worldometers.info/weight-loss/Diet DrugsFitness in the 80shttps://fitisafeministissue.com/2014/10/01/cankles-more-broken-body-parts-you-can-feel-bad-about-or-please-lets-just-stop/https://www.harpersbazaar.com/uk/beauty/fitness-wellbeing/news/a37546/problem-areas-your-body-fat-explained/Latoya Shauntay SnellRoz the DivaRoz was a guest in our podcast - listen here@fatbodyPikatesDamali Fraiser
Episode 59: Are You Certain You Need Certifications?
Oct 18 2023
Episode 59: Are You Certain You Need Certifications?
Welcome to our supersized Episode 59 of the Movement Logic podcast and the final episode of Season 3! In this episode, Laurel and Sarah discuss certifications for movement professionals. Are they necessary? Are they useful? Do they help promote you, or just the brand? Should you be focusing on it so much?You will learn:Do certifications in the movement industry function to a means to ensure quality control and accountability the way that the equivalent does in a regulated industryDo the tests measure meaningful and important qualities of a movement teacher or do they measure what is easy to measureWhat are some drawbacks to certificationsWhat are some positive aspects of certificationsThe differences between regulated and unregulated industriesDoes promoting a course as ‘safe’ require any proof in an unregulated industry?Can a certification course really claim to be a safer form of movement than any other?Why are many teachers looking for certification in their continuing education classes?The value of longer form, apprentice/student to teacher/mentor relationship versus a weekend trainingThat Yoga Alliance is not the evil overlord that so many seem to think it isDoes having letters after your name make you more credible or trustworthy?Episode 48: Alignment Dogma - PelvisEpisode 54: Alignment Dogma - SpineEpisode 58: Alignment Dogma - ShouldersVisit our website www.movementlogictutorials.com for more paid and free education!Get on our mailing list to be kept in the know about upcoming courses.
Episode 58: Alignment Dogma - Shoulders
Oct 11 2023
Episode 58: Alignment Dogma - Shoulders
Welcome to Season 3 and Episode 59 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel and Sarah discuss dogmatic beliefs and myths around the shoulders from the yoga, Pilates, and strength training worlds. We also discuss how given the fact that shoulder joint is a “complex” of many bones and joints, it’s much more useful that teachers keep their approach to teaching this area as simple as possible (and stop micro-managing their students shoulders!)You will learn:The bones and joints of the shoulder joint complexMant shoulder “fun facts”The directions of movement of the shoulderWhat horizontal abduction and adduction areWhat scapular tilt/winging is and why it’s not a problemHow scapular movement often mirrors where we are reaching our hand toWhat scapulohumeral rhythm isThat the shoulder blade’s path across the rib cage is curvilinear.Simplifying how we talk about shoulder movement and function to either a push or a pull.The relationship between shoulder posture and alignment and shoulder pain and injuryHow it’s hard to think scientifically and very human to think un-scientificallyWhy “shoulders back and down” is often (but not always!) an inefficient and counter-productive way to cue the shouldersWhy micromanaging shoulder posture doesn’t change posture long term.Why “fixing” someone’s alignment in chaturanga doesn’t help them acquire the strength they’d need to build to be able to do chaturanga with optimal alignmentHow scapular dyskinesis and scapular winging are differentThe fine line between using movement to solve movement problems (which is inside of a movement teacher’s scope of practice) and then diagnosing problems for students and prescribing movement to fix it (which is outside of a yoga teacher’s scope of practice.)How upper and lower cross syndrome is an outdated (but still very influential) model for explaining posture and offering solutions to that posture.Visit our website www.movementlogictutorials.com for more paid and free education!Get on our mailing list to be kept in the know about upcoming courses.Check out our Movement Logic Shoulders TutorialShoulder Girdle VideoNote: we cannot source the origin of this video. If you know the origin, please let us know!Arthroscopic subacromial decompression for subacromial shoulder pain… randomised surgical trialSubacromial decompression surgery for rotator cuff diseaseAcromiohumeral distance and supraspinatus tendon thickness in people with shoulder impingement syndrome…Scapular dyskinesis
Episode 57: Move Over Big Boys. We Lift Heavy Too.
Oct 4 2023
Episode 57: Move Over Big Boys. We Lift Heavy Too.
Welcome to Episode 57 of the Movement Logic podcast. In this episode, Laurel and Sarah discuss the fact that lifting heavy is not automatically a strength sport and that more people would feel invited to lift heavy if the media didn’t fixate so much on barbells as equipment for large, young, competitive male lifters and instead represented people that look more like everyone else and shared goals beyond competitive ones.You will learn:The difference between powerlifting, Olympic weightlifting, body-building, and lifting heavy weights.Why large, young men are over-represented in the media’s depiction of lifting heavy weights, and how this has been a deterrent to other groups of people (especially older women) who potentially have more to gain from lifting heavy weights than large, young men do.How competitive athletes often have to take their training to extreme levels, but how everyone else who wants to see enormous benefits to their health can train with a far more moderate approach.Sarah and Laurel’s first impression of lifting heavy weights growing up.How being an elite athlete can often mean sacrificing non-insignificant aspects of health.How when women start lifting weights they also start saying no to toxic bullshit in their lives.Risk of injury is often higher amongst more experienced/elite lifters.How women’s fear of getting “bulky” is understandable given that in our patriarchal society, women are often rewarded for a small and thin appearance.Ironically lifting heavy, despite what conventional wisdom might have us believe, is not typically the best way to bulk up.Everyone assumes that old age means getting frail, gaining weight, and becoming less capable, but it absolutely does not need to.Standing up out of a chair becomes a non-issue if older people are regularly squatting heavy.Sign up for our Bone Density Course: Lift for Longevity before the October 8th deadline!A 4-Year Analysis of the Incidence of Injuries Among CrossFit-Trained ParticipantsEpisode 1: Movement vs Exercise vs SportEpisode 16: Training the Non-Traditional Athlete with Rosalyn Mayse, AKA Roz the DivaEpisode 45: Injury and Safety in Strength and YogaEpisode 11: Let's Stop Fragilifying Older People AlreadyDoes Menopause Cause Weight Gain?
Episode 55: How to Start (and Teach) Strength Training
Sep 20 2023
Episode 55: How to Start (and Teach) Strength Training
Welcome to Episode 55 of the Movement Logic podcast. In this episode, Laurel answers two questions that she gets regularly from folks online. They are: How can I get started with strength training? And, how can I “learn more about” strength training? Spoiler: the best way to get started with strength training (the doing and the teaching) is by…wait for it…strength training!In this episode you will learn:The three most important elements of strength training—exercise technique, programming, and coaching.Why yoga and Pilates teachers are already generally well-versed in exercise technique, but without the added component of external load and the goal of strength.Yoga and Pilates teachers are typically not well-versed in programming, which is how we apply the principle of progressive overload to work toward building strength.Coaching is key for deep understanding of both exercise technique and programming.Laurel’s evolution from teaching yoga to becoming a strength coach.The plusses, minuses and trade-offs of DIY program templates, group classes, one-on-ones, and more.How yoga and Pilates teachers are accustomed to learning in a live, follow along format, and given then, how it can be a rude awakening to discover that programs in strength are often delivered in PDF format and personal trainer certifications mostly ask you to read a textbook and pass a test.Why personal trainer certifications do not provide very much practical know-how for how to be a personal trainer.How the Bone Density Course: Lift for Longevity delivers on the three most important elements of getting started with strength and learning about strength training—exercise technique, programming, and coaching.How the CSCS is widely considered the gold standard of personal trainer certifications but that it almost exclusively caters to competitive athletes (who make up a fraction of people who resistance train.)How being a dedicated student of the thing you eventually want to teach is the most valuable way to prepare yourself to actually teach something.How strength is defined, the systems in the body involved, and what the main adaptations (or changes) to your body are when you build strength.That we can be strong in many ways,so it’s helpful to have a specific performance goal.Why specific, performance goals are the best way to reach health and aesthetic goals.Sign up for our free info session all about our Bone Density Course: Lift for Longevity Thursday, Sep. 22nd 12 PT/ 3 ETSign up for our Bone Density Course: Lift for Longevity before the October 8th deadline! We won’t be offering this for another year.The NSCA textbook is used to study for the CSCS - Essentials of Strength and ConditioningEffect of Online Home-Based Resistance Exercise Training on Physical Fitness, Depression, Stress…Association of Efficacy of Resistance Exercise Training With Depressive Symptoms…
Episode 54: Alignment Dogma - Spine
Sep 13 2023
Episode 54: Alignment Dogma - Spine
Welcome to Season 3 and Episode 54 of the Movement Logic podcast! In this episode, Laurel and Sarah discuss dogmatic beliefs and myths around the lower back, upper back, and neck from the yoga, Pilates, and strength training worlds. You will learn:That the spine is made up of over 360 joints so maybe we should move it in all the ways (instead of keep it neutral all the time).That people are really bad at determining what position the spine is in just by observing (says research).That movement variety and movement preparation > “fixing” someone's alignment in a movement.Most yoga teachers never learn how to help their students progressively overload the strength they'd need to actually do the poses they teach.Pain causes people to adopt certain postures, but then what happens is people often flip this in their mind and say that it's the person's suboptimal posture that caused them the pain.Posture neither causes nor predicts pain (says science.)Lumbar flexion is demonized while sitting (don’t schlump) or bending forward (don’t round your back!) but research has been unable to connect flexing the lumbar spine in these scenarios with low back pain or injury.Deadlifting and squatting have been fearmongered to people who flex their lumbar spines in these exercises, but laboratory equipment has shown that even when it looks like someone has a neutral spine in these exercises, their lumbar spine is actually quite flexed.Any exercise is better than no exercise for low back pain, but no particular exercise is better than any other for low back pain.Why thoracic/upper back “hyper” kyphosis (a rounded upper back) is not a pathology.That back-bending is probably just flat bending in the thoracic spine.That “tech neck” does not predict neck pain.The neck is not a crane, and so we cannot apply the same physics to predict how a forward neck will respond to holding the load of the head forward of the body that we’d use to predict how a crane will respond to holding a load forward of its foundation.People who force their necks to be neutral have more pain than people with tech neck posture.Sign up here for the Live Strength Training Webinar on Sept 14th with 30 day replayResearch mentioned in this episode:Spinal Degeneration in Asymptomatic PopulationsIntervertebral disc herniation: studies on a porcine modelTo flex or not to flex? Is there a relationship between lumbar spine flexion during lifting and low back pain?Arthrogenic neuromusculature inhibition: A foundational investigation of existence in the hip jointEffects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activityPosture and time spent using a smartphone are not correlated with neck painIs neck posture subgroup in late adolescence a risk factor for persistent neck pain in young adults?