Sharp Waves: ILAE's epilepsy podcast

ILAE

Epilepsy affects more than 50 million people. Every day. Sharp Waves brings you stories about people with epilepsy, physicians treating epilepsy, and researchers studying the condition. We'll cover the latest research, challenges to diagnosis and treatment, and issues from around the world. read less
Health & FitnessHealth & Fitness

Episodes

Dravet syndrome and the influence of the genome: Dr. Sanjay Sisodiya
Oct 9 2023
Dravet syndrome and the influence of the genome: Dr. Sanjay Sisodiya
Dravet syndrome is a rare, severe epilepsy caused by changes in a gene called SCN1A. The changes cause the gene to stop functioning normally. But not everyone with this type of genetic change develops Dravet syndrome, and people with Dravet also have a wide range of clinical characteristics, which can't be fully explained by these changes. What else is going on? We spoke with Dr. Sanjay Sisodiya about a recent publication on genomic influences in Dravet syndrome.This episode is based on a recent publication in the journal Brain:Widespread genomic influences on phenotype in Dravet syndrome, a ‘monogenic’ conditionDravet syndrome is a rare severe epilepsy typically caused by loss-of-function SCN1A variants. Despite a recognizable core phenotype, Dravet syndrome also has phenotypic heterogeneity, which cannot be explained by clinical factors or SCN1A variants. This relatively small study (34 adults) found that additional genomic variation contributes to the diversity of phenotypes found in Dravet syndromes. The authors suggest that the SCN1A variant may need to act against a "broadly compromised genomic background" to generate the full Dravet syndrome phenotype, and that genomic resilience may contribute to a reduction in mortality risk among adults with Dravet syndrome.  Support the showSharp Waves episodes are meant for informational purposes only, and not as clinical or medical advice.We welcome feedback and episode ideas at podcast@ilae.org.The International League Against Epilepsy is the world's preeminent association of health professionals and scientists, working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
Circadian rhythms and epilepsy Part I: Dr. Mark Quigg
Jul 3 2023
Circadian rhythms and epilepsy Part I: Dr. Mark Quigg
The cyclic properties of seizures have been known for more than 100 years, but does everyone with epilepsy have a seizure pattern? What can be learned from seizure diaries, RNS data, and animal models, and how can this information guide further research and clinical care? Dr. Laurent Sheybani talks with Dr. Mark Quigg about circadian rhythms in epilepsy.Selected publications:Electrocorticographic events from long-term ambulatory brain recordings can potentially supplement seizure diaries - Quigg M, et al. (2020) Epilepsy ResearchCircadian and ultradian patterns of epileptiform discharges differ by seizure-onset location during long-term ambulatory intracranial monitoring - Spencer DC, et al. (2016) EpilepsiaInterrater reliability in interpretation of electrocorticographic seizure detections of the responsive neurostimulator - Quigg M, et al. (2015) EpilepsiaVariation of seizure frequency with ovulatory status of menstrual cycles - Herzog AG, et al. (2011) EpilepsiaIs there a circadian variation of epileptiform abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy? Pavlova MK, et al. (2009) Epilepsy & Behavior Support the showSharp Waves episodes are meant for informational purposes only, and not as clinical or medical advice.We welcome feedback and episode ideas at podcast@ilae.org.The International League Against Epilepsy is the world's preeminent association of health professionals and scientists, working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
An update on SUDEP and SUDEP counseling: Dr. Suvasini Sharma
Jun 19 2023
An update on SUDEP and SUDEP counseling: Dr. Suvasini Sharma
Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) affects about one out of every 1.000 people with epilepsy.  Despite its rarity, SUDEP is important to discuss, but some physicians are wary of having the conversations. Dr. Emma Carter spoke with Dr. Suvasini Sharma about SUDEP, why it's important to inform patients and families about it, and how to manage risk factors.The greatest risk factor for SUDEP is uncontrolled generalized tonic-clonic seizures (previously called grand mal seizures). Nocturnal seizures and certain comorbidities, such as developmental delay, also are risk factors.SUDEP information for families from the ILAE (ilae.org) Relevant articles:Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) - What pediatricians need to know Garg D, Sharma S, 2020Effect of counselling of parents of children with epilepsy focusing on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy Kumari S, et al., 2022Counseling about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP): A global survey of neurologists' opinions Asadi-Pooya AA, et al., 2022 Support the showSharp Waves episodes are meant for informational purposes only, and not as clinical or medical advice.We welcome feedback and episode ideas at podcast@ilae.org.The International League Against Epilepsy is the world's preeminent association of health professionals and scientists, working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
Neurocysticercosis and epileptogenesis: Dr. Hector Garcia
May 21 2023
Neurocysticercosis and epileptogenesis: Dr. Hector Garcia
Neurocysticercosis - an infection of the brain by a pork tapeworm (Taenia solium) – is one of the most common causes of seizures worldwide. People with neurocysticercosis have incidentally ingested tapeworm eggs, which are found in the feces of people who have tapeworms in their digestive systems (a condition called taeniasis). The eggs can migrate to any organ and form larval cysts; the brain is one of the most common sites.Pigs are intermediate hosts, so neurocysticercosis occurs in regions where humans live in close contact with pigs and eat undercooked pork. Poor sanitation that leads to environmental fecal contamination is a major factor in transmission. Selected publications from the Cysticercosis Working Group in Peru:Quality of life in patients with symptomatic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis (2022)New animal models of neurocysticercosis can help understand epileptogenesis in neuroinfection (2022)Geographically targeted interventions versus mass drug administration to control Taenia solium cysticercosis in Peru (2021)Current diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis (2021)Neurocysticercosis: A frequent cause of seizures, epilepsy, and other neurological morbidity in most of the world (2021) Support the showSharp Waves episodes are meant for informational purposes only, and not as clinical or medical advice.We welcome feedback and episode ideas at podcast@ilae.org.The International League Against Epilepsy is the world's preeminent association of health professionals and scientists, working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.