Bearcat QHSE Training LLC

David

Quality, Health, Safety and Environmental Training, Coaching and Consulting. read less

Bearcat QHSE Training LLC Podcast for the week on July 25th 2022
Jul 25 2022
Bearcat QHSE Training LLC Podcast for the week on July 25th 2022
Welcome to  BearCat QHC training.com weekly podcast so today I want to start with some basic acronyms word definitions of the quality health safety environmental field so there's your first one QQ stands for quality health safety and environmental and those are common one that is very transferable to your home is personal protective equipment or PPE absolutely vital for keeping you safe when using tools hand tools and power tools first and first out FIFO or fifo it's a way of managing inventory it's also a good way too keep your food rotating in your refrigerator so you're not grabbing something that's older or leaving something back in there that's going to go to waste 'cause you haven't rotated your foodvery similar to the first and first out is first expired first out so maybe you bought 2 gallons of milk at one store and they expired July 1st and then you bought another gallon knowing that you had some recipes that require more milk for the weekend but it expires June 20th so he's going to put the one that expires first closest to the front easier for you to get to so you don't allow it to go bad you go use that first so those are just a few acronyms or definitions that you'll hear me discuss each week in the weekly podcasts we try touch on quality health safety environmental topics may not have all four on the same podcast but throughout the month you should hit on we should hit on each one so BearCat QHC training LLC is located in Central Florida we provide training for quality health environmentalthis can be operator training for power equipment industrial equipment it's also includes the process for filing certain paperwork within your county or your state as it can be quite complex depending on the type of government agency you're dealing with  so thank you for tuning into this podcast this week podcast you can find us at www.bearcatkcom if there's content you're interested then please let me know I'd be more than happy to cover it thank you have a safe and productive weekNext week we will cover injury and illness preventionSupport the show
Bearcat QHSE Training LLC's 9th Podcast
Feb 7 2022
Bearcat QHSE Training LLC's 9th Podcast
Welcome to Bearcat QHSE Training LLCIn these weekly Podcasts on Mondays, we will be discussing Quality, Health, Safety and Environmental training and concernsWhat is a USDOT Number?Companies that operate commercial vehicles transporting passengers or hauling cargo in interstate commerce shall register with the FMCSA and must have a USDOT Number. Also, commercial intrastate hazardous materials carriers who haul types and quantities requiring a safety permit must register for a USDOT Number.The USDOT Number serves as a unique identifier when collecting and monitoring a company's safety information acquired during audits, compliance reviews, crash investigations, and inspections.  Most states require commercial vehicles to obtain a DOT number when operating within the state. By requiring a DOT number, the state creates an extra layer of regulation on commercial operators within its borders. Whenever a lift operator in our facility hits, damages, or property we retrain the operator. This does not seem to be highly effective as the same operators are constantly needing retraining.First of all if you are conducting proper investigations and root cause analysis I would question the fact that the root cause is always the operator because that's typically not the case the operator can be a contributing factor or a cause but not the root cause very seldomly the root cause when you conduct your investigation and do you cause analysis you should be seeking the failure within the process or procedure.  quite often the failure is lack of appropriate supervision or inadequate training something is broken. I'll give you an example an operator was operating a forklift or power industrial truck in a warehouse with his foot outside of the cabin a supervisor and manager walked past this person and saw it but did not address it because they were in a hurry to go to a meeting which is absolutely unacceptable so this operator kept hanging their foot outside of the cabin and eventually took a turn and crushed her foot and ankle against an upright as they took a corner. you can't tell me the root cause of that accident is the operator he's contributing factor and he was acting outside of the written procedure however the root cause has to lie on the supervisor and manager for failing to address a safety issue when they observed it So what that supervisor manager safety guy whoever it was that decided not to act on it did as they implied consent they implied consent that it's OK to do that because we didn't say anything even though the training does not support operating with any part of your body outside of the confines of the cage or cab of the equipment. well, it is just one example, but I would challenge you to look for something other than the operator in your investigations and root cause analysis as being the root cause because nine times out of ten it is not the operator and when it is the operator there is always something else involved right.Support the show (