Open Source Governance

Pendar Nabipour

Open Source Governance is a project that aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.

In this podcast we invite people from different disciplines to debate, investigate, and to help empowering communities to find possible ways of self-governing. These conversations eventually help the design process of the blueprint.


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episode #6, Populism & Alt-Right with Florian Cramer
Apr 22 2022
episode #6, Populism & Alt-Right with Florian Cramer
For the sixth episode of our podcast, I have invited Florian Cramer to discuss populism and alt-right with me. During our conversation, we touched upon many subjects; from populism and its contemporary history, different types of populism, populist leaders, Dutch politics, alt-right and its different shapes, to online mobilization of the right-wing, open-source programming and its history, elections, and direct democracy.Florian Cramer is a reader, or practice-oriented research professor, in visual culture and Autonomous Practices at Willem de Kooning Academy, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.He has written a large number of critical essays throughout his career which encompassed both DIY publishing and academic writing since the 1980s. Florian investigates transformations of cultural production, no matter whether they take place in institutional art systems or in popular culture. That's why he has been interested in meme culture for more than a decade.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms,including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.com About Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which agroup can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that canhelp organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research andsocial design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications,and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing.This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idealies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointmentwith the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies,and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that canreplace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast,our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not. also have a Discord server for our community that we encourage you to join:  Cover photo:Theo Huijgens music:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodI Knew a Guy by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #6, Populism & Alt-Right with Florian Cramer
Apr 22 2022
episode #6, Populism & Alt-Right with Florian Cramer
For the sixth episode of our podcast, I have invited Florian Cramer to discuss populism and alt-right with me. During our conversation, we touched upon many subjects; from populism and its contemporary history, different types of populism, populist leaders, Dutch politics, alt-right and its different shapes, to online mobilization of the right-wing, open-source programming and its history, elections, and direct democracy.Florian Cramer is a reader, or practice-oriented research professor, in visual culture and Autonomous Practices at Willem de Kooning Academy, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.He has written a large number of critical essays throughout his career which encompassed both DIY publishing and academic writing since the 1980s. Florian investigates transformations of cultural production, no matter whether they take place in institutional art systems or in popular culture. That's why he has been interested in meme culture for more than a decade.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms,including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.com About Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which agroup can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that canhelp organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research andsocial design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications,and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing.This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idealies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointmentwith the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies,and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that canreplace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast,our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not. also have a Discord server for our community that we encourage you to join:  Cover photo:Theo Huijgens music:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodI Knew a Guy by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #5, Trust and Governance
Mar 6 2022
episode #5, Trust and Governance
The central topic of this episode is trust and governance. I will be talking about trust within a government, how does trusting a government work, and why does the government need the trust of the people. I will introduce what instruments are available to keep the trust under check. And of course, I will introduce some issues there are regarding trust and governance when using the existing systems in place. I will refer to David van Reybrouck’s book ‘Against Elections’ to provide more in-depth analyses regarding the problem of trust and governance.Then I will discuss ‘Liberal Democracy’ and its three pillars. Then I will talk about populism and will give a few examples about how it can be a great threat to trust and governance. Examples of Covid restrictions will be given as a way of comparison between how people from different parts of the world trust the functionality of their government. The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms,including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.com AboutOpen Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.  sources:Against Elections: The Case for DemocracyFrance 24 interview: Author David Van Reybrouck on why elections are outdated. The rise of modern populism - Takis S. Pappas: Rumor Camp:  Cover photo:Samuel Corum, Getty Images music:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeod Backed Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeod I Knew a Guy by Kevin MacLeod Dances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #4, Dutch politics with Quinsy Gario
Jul 18 2021
episode #4, Dutch politics with Quinsy Gario
In this episode, I had a conversation with Quinsy Gario about Dutch politics. We discussed the structure of Dutch politics, its majority and minority political parties, the obstacles for the communities and the minorities to voice their opinion, the ever-growing centralization of power, and some recent examples to follow these topics.Quinsy also discussed the colonial history of The Netherlands, who is Dutch, "The New Dutch" population origins, and much more.In the end, we talked about Bij1, which is a new political party in The Netherlands that is fighting for minority rights and empowering people who are underrepresented.About our guest Quinsy Gario:Quinsy Gario is a performance-poet and artist from Curaçao and St. Maarten, two islands in the Caribbean that share continued occupation and colonization by the Netherlands. His work centers on decolonial remembering and unsettling institutional and interpersonal normalizations of colonial practices. Gario's most well-known work is Zwarte Piet Is Racisme (2011–2012). As a member of the collective Family Connection established in 2005 by Glenda Martinus and Gala Martinus, respectively his mother and aunt, his current research is about attempting to institute otherwise. He is a Utrecht University media studies, gender studies and postcolonial studies alumnus and a graduate of the Master Artistic Research program of the Royal Academy of Art The Hague. He is a 2017 Humanity in Action Detroit Fellow, 2017/2018 BAK Fellow, 2019/2020 APASS participant and a 2020/2021 Sandberg Institute Critical Studies Fellow. Gario received among others the Royal Academy Master Thesis Prize 2017, the Black Excellence Award 2016, the Amsterdam Fringe Festival Silver Award 2015, The Kerwin Award 2014 and the Hollandse Nieuwe 12 Theatermakers Prize 2011. His work has been shown in among other places Van Abbemuseum (Eindhoven), MACBA (Barcelona), Latvian National Museum of Art (Riga), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), MHKA (Antwerp), TENT (Rotterdam) and Göteborgs Konsthall (Gothenburg). Gario also ran for Dutch parliament as a candidate for the political party BIJ1 in the 2021 national elections.About Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms, including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.comPlease have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.Cover image: Annemarija Gulbemusic:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodBacked Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #3, Referendums and different voting systems
Jun 3 2021
episode #3, Referendums and different voting systems
As a continuation to introducing direct and indirect democracy, in this episode I will explain what a referendum is and what different types it has. I will also introduce several common voting methods including plurality voting, Condorcet method, instant runoff, score voting, and the electoral college. Then I will carry on to explain what faults these voting methods might have.Further, I argue that the questions composed for referendums are usually too large and they ignore minority rights. The minorities also will be neglected in many cases of electing representatives.And finally, I will introduce the notion of The Tyranny of the Majority.In the end, I would like to ask you to please read and educate yourself about the struggles of Palestinian people, and to please use the right terms when talking about Palestine and Israel. Apartheid, ethnic cleansing, and illegal occupation. Learn about #SheikhJarrah to understand what is going there at the moment when the tensions are high.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms, including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.comAbout Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.De Gedroomde Stad episode about this project and my artistic practice (episode 4): on Britannica: introducing different types of the referendum: of the Majority: and initiatives: image: Stuxmusic:The song about Palestine by Eman Askar, TikTok, IG, FB: @emmasworld.101 Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodBacked Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #2, Elections
Feb 27 2021
episode #2, Elections
Representative systems are based on elections. These days elections are the best thing we know to practice democracy with. But are elections really a good tool for practicing democracy?In this episode, I will give you theoretical and practical explanations about elections, how they have been and are practiced around the world, as well as some examples of sham and legitimate elections. In the end, I will cite from the book of David van Reybrouk called Against Elections, and I will refer to his opinion about how trust between the government and the public is missing when you look at elections.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms, including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.comAbout Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.sources:Against Elections by David van ReybroukBritannica several Wikipedia articlescover image:[According to US library of congress]Title: N***o voting in Cardoza [i.e., Cardozo] High School in [Washington,] D.C. / [MST].photographer: Trikosko, Marion S., Date: 1964 Nov. 3.music:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodBacked Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode #1, The Representative System
Jan 31 2021
episode #1, The Representative System
In this episode, I will introduce the representative system, how it works, and also I will talk a little bit about its history. I will dive into the flaws of the representative system, as well as its problems. And I will briefly explain why there is an urgent need for direct democracy.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms, including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.comAbout Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.cover image:The chamber of the House of Commons in Londonphotographer: unknownmusic:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodBacked Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
episode zero (Trailer) - Open Source Governance
Dec 15 2020
episode zero (Trailer) - Open Source Governance
This podcast is part of the project Open Source Governance. In this podcast we will discuss how to make collective decisions, and rethink the representative systems. Also, the terms and notions of collective decision making will be introduced, public sessions will be available to listen to, and most importantly, specialists and guests are invited to discuss several issues within the realm of different disciplines.This episode is the introductory episode to the podcast in which you can learn what you can expect to receive by listening to this show.The podcast is available to listen to on several platforms, including the website of the project:www.opensourcegovernance.comAbout Open Source Governance:Open Source Governance aims to design a blueprint with which a group can collectively and inclusively form questions and find answers that can help organize their community. The project is an interdisciplinary research and social design process that uses debates, workshops, case studies, publications, and other mediums to empower groups to find possible ways of self-governing. This is done by investigating the wisdom of the crowd. At the core of the idea lies the notion of governmentality. The concept departs from the disappointment with the representative systems in inclusively and fairly organizing societies, and observation of available tools (namely open-source programming) that can replace or challenge the current systems in place.Please have a look at our website and subscribe to our podcast, our newsletter, and follow us on social media if you already did not.music:Unanswered Questions by Kevin MacLeodBacked Vibes Clean by Kevin MacLeodDances and Dames by Kevin MacLeodall licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)