agri-Culture

agri-Culture

Join Rick and Elara of Backyard Green Films as we traverse the U.S on a green adventure! We travel throughout the land in our travel trailer (nicknamed Bessie), on a mission to share the stories, dedication, and wisdom of America's stewards of sustainable agriculture who've followed their own 'call of the land.' From scientists to geneticists to organic farmers and ranchers - plus a bounty of interesting folks we meet along the way, each voice is uniquely diverse, and each story compels us to uncover, discover, and share. Please become a Patreon member and help support our podcast. Copy and paste the link in your browser. https://www.patreon.com/agriCulturePodcast

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Ep 181 The BIPOC Epoch
4d ago
Ep 181 The BIPOC Epoch
The New York State Sheep & Wool Festival was just last month, and it’s Thanksgiving already.  We’ve got a podcast for you from the wild and wooly, festive and colorful event. If you’re in a work truck or jeans ad with all of those good looking farm people tossing bales of hay around, you might get the impression that anyone who produces food or fiber in America is…well, pretty vanilla.  And considering how many of our ag products are an amalgamation of cultures and peoples throughout our history (corn, beans, pigs, horses, cattle, turkey, cranberries, squash…), maybe we’d be smart to stop and think about how diversity has made us strong.The BIPOC booth at Rhinebeck represented a slice of an underrepresented category in most of the visible ag press these days, and we were glad these delightfully different took time out from the crowd questions to answer some of ours (the gorgeous combinations of fiber and an aqua-color to (hand) dye for were developing right there in their breed barn booth.  Delicious).  BIPOC is an acronym that stands for Black, Indigenous and People of Color, and though some might wonder if this podcast will be politically correct – not so.  We hope you hear it and do your own thinking about why representation is so important to agricultural diversity of all types.  Our strength in humanity is in our many shapes sizes, and colors, and we hope you celebrate them all with us.  Links:        @theknottycatIG:        @viva_acresIG:        @anne.choi the show
Ep 181 The BIPOC Epoch
4d ago
Ep 181 The BIPOC Epoch
The New York State Sheep & Wool Festival was just last month, and it’s Thanksgiving already.  We’ve got a podcast for you from the wild and wooly, festive and colorful event. If you’re in a work truck or jeans ad with all of those good looking farm people tossing bales of hay around, you might get the impression that anyone who produces food or fiber in America is…well, pretty vanilla.  And considering how many of our ag products are an amalgamation of cultures and peoples throughout our history (corn, beans, pigs, horses, cattle, turkey, cranberries, squash…), maybe we’d be smart to stop and think about how diversity has made us strong.The BIPOC booth at Rhinebeck represented a slice of an underrepresented category in most of the visible ag press these days, and we were glad these delightfully different took time out from the crowd questions to answer some of ours (the gorgeous combinations of fiber and an aqua-color to (hand) dye for were developing right there in their breed barn booth.  Delicious).  BIPOC is an acronym that stands for Black, Indigenous and People of Color, and though some might wonder if this podcast will be politically correct – not so.  We hope you hear it and do your own thinking about why representation is so important to agricultural diversity of all types.  Our strength in humanity is in our many shapes sizes, and colors, and we hope you celebrate them all with us.  Links:        @theknottycatIG:        @viva_acresIG:        @anne.choi the show
Ep 176 The Turkmen and the Akhal-Teke
Sep 7 2022
Ep 176 The Turkmen and the Akhal-Teke
We’re back from our trip to the San Juan Islands, which can comfortably be said to be one of the most beautiful places on the planet.  It’s full of natural beauty and interesting creatures, so on the way over to geographical bliss, you’ll stand on the windswept deck of the Anacortes ferry, viewing and smelling glorious the forested stretches of Sitka spruce, western red cedar and shore pines which blanket the shoreline of the Salish Sea and the Olympic Peninsula.  You’ll be amazed by the local residents – things like seals, Bald Eagles, migrating salmon, Orcas, and Akhal-Teke horses.  Wait.  What?  The beautifully exotic horse from Turkmenistan?  Yep, they were there too.  The ever-gracious Amrita Ibold set up an amazing visit, which not only included a visit to the so-friendly-they-could-be-dogs Akhal-Teke horses themselves (favorites from our last visit), but also a truly exotic interview with Gul Muhammet and his friend, representatives and leaders from the Turkmenian community in Seattle.  To top it off, there were authentic costumes and tack for our cameras to capture, and a beach and forest ride featuring the amazing equines.  As an experience, it will be hard to top this one in the BYGF universe.Turkmenistan is not too far from Ukraine, another place we hear a lot about these days.  As you listen to today’s podcast, we hope you might think about the people who can appreciate the current impact of all of those things we hear on the news, and write in history books.  Keeping the “Culture” part of agri-Culture is what it’s all about.  It’s the “living” part of our living history.Links: Support the show
Ep 171 James Reams: Too Many Songs, Not Enough Time
Jun 23 2022
Ep 171 James Reams: Too Many Songs, Not Enough Time
James Reams (1956-2022)So many songs to sing; and so little time to sing them. That was the mantra of James Reams, beloved and well-known Bluegrass performer and song writer. Because of his driving promotion of Bluegrass and Americana music, he had earned several nicknames durning his lifetime that reflected his contributions to the genre; Kentucky Songbird, Father of Brooklyn Bluegrass, and Ambassador of Bluegrass. Unfortunately for those of us who loved him, and the many people who were impacted by his zest for life and music he has passed on. On June 17th at 4:30 in the afternoon he passed away, at home surrounded by family and friends who loved him. Just a few days before his death, he commented to those sitting by his bed, “Dying – this gives me an idea of a new song.”James who was raised in the hills of Appalachia, was exposed to bluegrass from the time he could walk. At an early age he showed a talent for writing and performing the music of the region. James spent many an hour watching the regional variety show “Cas Walker Farm and Home Hour”.  The Farm and Home Hour featured many of the pioneers of bluegrass and launched many emerging stars. This, along with his father’s love of bluegrass had a profound effect on him.Kentucky SongbirdJames earned the nickname Kentucky Songbird by building an extensive library of work during his three-decade career and ten album releases. IBMA nominated him as Emerging Artist of the Year. The same year he was also nominated for Recording Event of the Year for his album James Reams, Walter Hensley and the Barons of Bluegrass.His latest album release occurred early in 2022. It is a massive 2 CD release with thirty songs - Like a Flowing River & Soundtrack Album on Mountain Redbird Music. This highly anticipated project follows the release of a documentary film from the previous year. The documentary celebrates the long musical performing and song writing career of James.Father of Brooklyn BluegrassThis James identifier was conferred on him because of his role in being a founding father of the Park Slope Bluegrass Oldtime Music Jamboree in Brooklyn, New York. This music event started in 1998, was organized by James, along with his long-time partner Tina Aridas. The event was a glorious celebration of bluegrass music. It accomplished this by combining live performances and workshops over a two-day period in September each year. The event was popular and attracted top performers from the northeast, and hundreds of participants every year.Ambassador of BluegrassJames promoted the spread of bluegrass beyond the release of his albums and extensive touring. A major accomplishment of his was the releasing of two documentary films that sought to spread the music he loved to people who otherwise not had an opportunity to sample this foot-stomping music. In 2021 the documentary of James’ bluegrass life in was released, Like a Flowing River: A Bluegrass Passage. The film that captures the spirit of what it means to be a musician, documenting all of the twists and turns that occur on a musician’s journey.On top of the previously mentioned accomplishments, James was also an ex-president of the Arizona Bluegrass Association. James has been a busy contributor to bluegrass from the early days of his career. His passion for music can be seen in his everyday life. You can be sure if there is a kitchen table in heaven, James will be sitting at it singing a soulful tune.Music from Mountain Redbird MusicLinks: the show
Ep 167 Jeremy Michaud:  A Fine-Tuned Machine – with Heart
May 19 2022
Ep 167 Jeremy Michaud: A Fine-Tuned Machine – with Heart
Have you ever seen one of those commercials for an all-American heavy-duty truck, with an all-American cowboy or farmer?  They’re usually off-loading dirty-but-not-too-dirty hay into a field, parked on a majestic mesa, with the sun shining about. There’s not a lot of sweat, and perfectly-placed dirt on all the faces.  No dirt on the cows, either.  It’s lovely and stirs the patriotic soul.  But the glories that can be achieved with a model, perfect lighting and a 20-person crew are not the reality of what actually happens on a farm.  It’s dirty.  It’s difficult.  And it’s really, really hard work with really long hours, seven days a week.Sometimes you meet people who are the epitome of all that, without the aid of the makeup girl or the continuity department.  You know them when you see them, and they don’t usually talk much about it, they just do it.  They built our agricultural production system in this country.  Today, we have an impromptu tailgate conversation with one of those people.Jeremy Michaud, from East Hardwick, Vermont is the head of the Michaud family, Kingdom Creamery, and Clair-A-Den Farm.  He is a no-nonsense man, with a strong love of family and the commitment it takes to raise a human being with solid values.  He is a perfect example of the best characteristics of the multipurpose American Milking Devon Cattle breed, because he gets right down to business, and does as much as he can to move forward in good times and bad.  (Though we do have to say that in our 90-degree weather last weekend, we did wish we had a 20-person crew and an air-conditioned star trailer).Links: the show