Raise the Line

Michael Carrese, Shiv Gaglani

Join hosts Shiv Gaglani, Hillary Acer and Michael Carrese for an ongoing exploration of how to improve health and healthcare with prominent figures and pioneers in healthcare innovation such as Chelsea Clinton, Mark Cuban, Dr. Ashish Jha, Dr. Eric Topol, Dr. Vivian Lee and Sal Khan as well as senior leaders at organizations such as the CDC, National Institutes of Health, Johns Hopkins University, WHO, Harvard University, NYU Langone and many others. read less
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Neuropsychiatric Impacts in Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
3d ago
Neuropsychiatric Impacts in Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
It’s hard for many to believe a tick bite or case of COVID can lead to severe mental illness, but we’ll be hearing from someone on this episode of Raise the Line who lived through just that experience. Dr. Raven Baxter also happens to be the host of this special series on post-acute infection syndromes produced in collaboration with the Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mt. Sinai. While struggling with long COVID, Raven developed panic attacks and other mental health problems, and even though she explained to providers that she previously had no history of mental illness, there was reluctance to attribute the symptoms to her body’s reaction to SARS‑CoV‑2. Unfortunately, this is not surprising to Dr. Shannon Delaney, a psychiatrist whose patients share similar stories. “People who are going through this can be suffering a lot, not only because of their symptoms, but because of invalidation from the medical community,” says Delaney, who believes brain inflammation caused by immune system dysregulation can explain why mental health issues emerge in this context. While Raven’s other guest, Dr. Mike VanElzakker, concurs, his research at Massachusetts General Hospital and the PolyBio Research Foundation focuses on the vagus nerve as a contributing factor to symptoms of various types. “I would argue at least part of what people with these complex chronic illnesses are experiencing is an ongoing sickness response and that may be because there is a signal that's constantly bombarding the vagus nerve, which may be sensitized by inflammation.” This is an eye-opening look at mind-body connections that are challenging conventional wisdom.  Mentioned in this episode:Mount Sinai Health System Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
Education As An Art: Alex Kendall, Program Director of the Emory University School of Medicine's Physician Assistant Program
Jun 13 2024
Education As An Art: Alex Kendall, Program Director of the Emory University School of Medicine's Physician Assistant Program
“I think education is very much of an artistic process. I love to think of this as kind of being in a museum. It's about curation of an experience,” says Alex Kendall who oversees the physician assistant training program at Emory University. As he takes on the role of director, Kendall’s background in art and anthropology give him an interesting perspective from which to build on and realize the program’s vision and mission, which are rooted in evidence-based education, leadership development, interprofessional education and creating patient-centered, community-oriented clinicians. Toward that end, one curated experience is participation in the longstanding Emory Farm Worker project in which students care for thousands of migrant workers from Florida, Georgia and other states. Among other things, it’s a great opportunity to deepen awareness of the social determinants of health and practice caring for diverse populations. Looking to the future, Kendall and colleagues are keen to prepare their students for growing trends that will impact their work as clinicians including team-based care, the aging of the population and the increase in climate-related health problems. “We ask ourselves what does the future of health and society look like in ten years and what is needed from physician assistants? Our job is to identify what medical education then needs to look like in order to meet those future challenges.” This expansive conversation with host Hillary Acer also touches on Emory’s cognitive apprenticeship curriculum, scaffolded learning, making primary care an easier choice of specialty and the growing interest in point of care ultrasound.Mentioned in this episode:Emory University School of Medicine PA Program Emory Farm Worker Project
The Role of Clotting in Long COVID: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
Jun 12 2024
The Role of Clotting in Long COVID: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
Why do patients with long COVID have such a wide array of symptoms affecting so many bodily systems? That bedeviling question is the focus of this episode of Raise the Line featuring Dr. Resia Pretorius, head of the Department of Physiological Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa and a renowned researcher in coagulation. “The underlying concept of what is happening, in our minds, is that long COVID is a widespread vascular endotheliitis, which is driven by the presence of all sorts of inflammatory molecules in circulation,” she tells host Dr. Raven Baxter of the Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses (CoRE). Because endothelial cells line blood vessels that travel to every part of the body, their impairment produces a range of symptoms. Dr. Pretorius and her research colleagues have discovered that “microclots” – abnormal proteins that prevent clots from breaking down – are another ingredient in the long COVID recipe due to their possible role in reducing oxygen flow to the brain and other organs. Because of their unusual structure, microclots are not detected by customary blood tests, leading Dr. Pretorius to add her voice to the chorus of stakeholders calling for the development of new diagnostic tests and additional treatments. “We need a concerted effort for trials. We need FDA approval for the laboratory test that we developed. I’m confident we will get it done, but it will take time, which is sad.” Tune in to learn about the possible causes of microclots, promising research on anticoagulation therapy and why long COVID is not a “checklist” disease, as our special series on post-acute infection syndromes continues. Mentioned in this episode:Mount Sinai Health SystemSteven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
Clinical Manifestations in Post Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
Jun 6 2024
Clinical Manifestations in Post Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
In a word cloud generated from this episode of Raise the Line, ‘communication’ would dominate: communication between the immune system, nervous system and connective tissue; communication between patients and providers; and communication among providers to solve challenging diagnostic puzzles. As our special series on post-acute infection syndromes continues, host Raven Baxter of the Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses (CoRE) is joined by neurologist Dr. Ilene Ruhoy, immunologist Dr. Anne Maitland and physical therapist Dr. Valerie Iovine Rogers to unravel the interconnectedness at work in these diseases and reveal key insights about caring for patients. “In the complex disease world, there isn’t a nice protocol that we have in other parts of medicine, so it takes a lot of listening and a lot of trial and error,” says Dr. Ruhoy. “The most important thing is to continue digging into that story and building that practitioner-patient relationship so that there's trust there,” adds Dr. Maitland. All agree that a lack of specialists in mast cell activation syndrome, hypermobility disorders and related areas puts a premium on developing referral networks so that diagnostic roadblocks do not end the search for answers. “It really harps on the importance of an interdisciplinary care team where all of us have to communicate with one another and educate the patient so they know what they're advocating for and where they need to go,” Dr. Rogers explains. Don’t miss this instructive conversation on both the art of patient care and the science of these often debilitating illnesses. Mentioned in this episode:Mount Sinai Health System Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
Next Gen Journeys Series: Dr. Brian Ogendi, Resident Physician at UVA Health
May 30 2024
Next Gen Journeys Series: Dr. Brian Ogendi, Resident Physician at UVA Health
If we didn’t know Dr. Brian Ogendi, we might be concerned about someone being able to pull off a residency and two fellowships while being a father of two young boys, but we do know Brian through his work with our Osmosis Medical Education Fellows (OMEF) program in which he played a major role while earning both his MD and MBA degrees. In other words, we’re not worried. Host Hillary Acer checked in with Brian recently as he was wrapping up med school and preparing to start a residency in Internal Medicine/Physician-Scientist Pathway at UVA Health with a fellowship in infectious disease and critical care medicine. “For me, medicine and research really go hand in hand. They enhance each other, they sharpen each other,” he explains. He’s already demonstrated that in his role as research advisor to the OMEF program where he drew on his work at the NIH and elsewhere to provide grounding and encouragement to learners. Brian is hoping to put all of this education and experience to work providing care to underserved communities both in the United States and in his native Kenya, leveraging a global network built through Osmosis to do so. Don’t miss this uplifting installment in our Next Gen Journeys series full of advice on juggling heavy workloads and family responsibilities while gaining the skills to become an effective, community-minded physician.Mentioned in this episode: UVA Health
Diagnosing Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
May 29 2024
Diagnosing Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
Diagnosing Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai“Tick-borne illnesses are incredibly stealthy and complicated and if I wasn't living and breathing it every day and seeing the intensity of these symptoms in patients, I would never believe it,” says Shannon Delaney, a psychiatrist in private practice in New York City. The complexity of such illnesses and the symptoms they cause is a key reason it can often take years to reach a diagnosis, which is the focus of this episode of Raise the Line, part of a special series on post-acute infection syndromes that Osmosis from Elsevier has created in partnership with the Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses (CoRE) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. In addition to Dr. Delaney, host Dr. Raven Baxter of CoRE welcomes Dr. Amy Kontorovich, an associate professor in Cardiology and Genomic Medicine at the Icahn School and Dr. David Putrino, director of Rehabilitation Innovation at Mount Sinai, to explore the limitations of current diagnostic tools and protocols and what changes are needed to improve patient care. Key themes include developing better tests for pathogens and educating providers to listen more carefully to patients. “In a typical medical encounter, the biggest dropped ball is completely disregarding an acute infection in the medical history,” stresses Putrino. All agree that providers need to be more comfortable with uncertainty and resist the urge to develop treatment plans that don’t address root causes. “If more doctors could just say, ‘I don't know’ I think it would do a great service to patients," adds Kontorovich. This is a candid and enlightening discussion about the importance of developing a collaborative, patient-centered mindset to provide the best care for those suffering with a range of post-acute infection syndromes.Mentioned in this episode: Mount Sinai Health SystemSteven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
Looking Abroad for Solutions to the Nursing Shortage in the US: Bhavdeep Singh, Founder and CEO of Global MedTeam
May 23 2024
Looking Abroad for Solutions to the Nursing Shortage in the US: Bhavdeep Singh, Founder and CEO of Global MedTeam
Today, we add another voice to our ongoing conversation on Raise the Line about how to improve the nurse staffing crisis faced by the US healthcare system. That voice belongs to Bhavdeep Singh, founder and CEO of Global MedTeam, a startup focused on bringing foreign-born nurses to the US to fill staff shortages. When Singh, who has deep experience in healthcare management, learned from a hospital executive that the annualized cost of employing one travel nurse can reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars in some locations, he realized there was room, and a need, for new approaches. “There's some wonderful work being done in this space, whether it's process improvement, remote monitoring, or software to make sure that we have the right kind of scheduling…all of these things are very helpful, but that's not going to get us to where we need to be. We will still have a huge shortage.” Singh believes employing pre-credentialed nurses from abroad, especially from the Philippines which has a long history of sending nurses to the US, is a viable part of the solution and his firm has put processes in place to make it a turnkey experience for employers. “We handle everything for the client including immigration from start to finish.” Join host Michael Carrese as he explores potential healthcare impacts on the “supplying” countries, the storied reputation of Filipino nurses and how this approach might also work for shortages in allied health professions. Mentioned in this episode: Global MedTeam
The Building Blocks of Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
May 22 2024
The Building Blocks of Post-Acute Infection Syndromes: Special Series from The Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses at Mount Sinai
Today, we’re excited to bring you the first episode in a special Raise the Line series that Osmosis from Elsevier has created in partnership with the Cohen Center for Recovery from Complex Chronic Illnesses (CoRE) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. PAIS: Root Causes, Drivers, and Actionable Solutions is a ten-part examination of a range of post-acute infection syndromes such as long COVID, tick-borne illness, chronic fatigue syndrome, and connective tissue disorders. Your host, Dr. Raven Baxter, a molecular biologist and Director of Science Communication at CoRE, will be joined by an impressive array of specialists in the field to explore causes, symptoms, diagnoses and treatments, as well as the devastating impact on patients who often struggle for many months or even years with a troubling span of symptoms affecting everything from muscle movement to mental health. As you’ll learn in the series, diagnostic protocols are lacking for many of these conditions, leading to delayed treatment and prolonged suffering for patients. In this inaugural episode, Dr. Baxter is joined by microbiologist Dr. Amy Proal, CEO of the PolyBio Research Foundation; Yale University Professor of Immunobiology, Dr. Akiko Iwasaki; and Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt, Professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine who will discuss the Building Blocks of PAIS.Mentioned in this episode: Mount Sinai Health System Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
Growing the Workforce for Psychedelic Assisted Therapy: Dr. Ingmar Gorman & Dr. Elizabeth Nielson, Co-Founders of Fluence Training
May 16 2024
Growing the Workforce for Psychedelic Assisted Therapy: Dr. Ingmar Gorman & Dr. Elizabeth Nielson, Co-Founders of Fluence Training
For those proponents of psychedelic-assisted therapy concerned that demand for therapists will outstrip supply in the coming years, you may be reassured by today’s conversation with Dr. Ingmar Gorman and Dr. Elizabeth Nielson, psychologists who have been involved in FDA-approved clinical trials of MDMA and psilocybin, and the co-founders of a company called Fluence Training which is working to scale education for this purpose. As they explain to host Shiv Gaglani, they see their task, broadly speaking, as serving three categories of people: those with general interest in the field; all types of clinicians who want to be able to have informed conversations with patients wishing to discuss their current and/or future use; and those who want to become therapists in this modality. Fluence is especially well-positioned for that last group because of Gorman’s and Nielson’s involvement in designing therapy protocols in clinical trials, but also because of their work developing therapy manuals for drug companies. “If and when their drugs go to market, we’ll be able to train clinicians in the community who will be working with those compounds,” says Gorman. One bottom line message in this richly-informed discussion is that the field needs all comers and they hope people aren’t dissuaded by misconceptions about what’s required. “We hear all the time, 'I want to be involved, but I’d have to go back to school and get all these years of clinical experience' when the reality is there's just so many ways now to get involved,” says Nielson. This is a great overview of the status of training, the potential pitfalls awaiting the field, the importance of managing patient expectations, and much more.Mentioned in this episode: https://www.fluencetraining.com/
Scalable Education for Cancer Patients and Their Loved Ones: Dr. David Grew, Founder and CEO of PRIMR
May 15 2024
Scalable Education for Cancer Patients and Their Loved Ones: Dr. David Grew, Founder and CEO of PRIMR
Part of why we love bringing Raise the Line to you is we get to introduce you to creative, committed people who see challenges in the healthcare system as opportunities to improve it.  Today’s guest, radiation oncologist Dr. David Grew, is a perfect example. In the depths of COVID when his patients had to meet with him unaccompanied by a support person, he realized his ability to help people understand the complexities of their care was more important than ever, so he doubled-down on his practice of making simple drawings for them on whatever piece of paper was handy. When patients told them they were bringing the papers home so they could explain things to family members, he realized he needed to up his game. “That’s when the light bulb went off. I need to digitize these drawings so that we can scale this educational moment between a doctor and a patient,” he tells host Michael Carrese. Armed with a laptop and basic educational software, Dr. Grew founded the company PRIMR and started building a library of short, animated videos containing the most common explanations he would give patients. When clinical trial managers noticed what he was doing, they wanted in and so a major focus of PRIMR is educating potential trial participants as well. “I'm on a mission to make sure that patients have an easy way to understand clinical trials.” Listen in to find out about a major medical and societal benefit to better education about these trials and to learn how Dr. Grew thinks PRIMR can help with the crisis of physician burnout.Mentioned in this episode: https://www.primrmed.com/
“Less Fear, More Go For It”: Dr. Desiree Franco Lugo, Regional Lead in the Osmosis Medical Education Fellowship
May 9 2024
“Less Fear, More Go For It”: Dr. Desiree Franco Lugo, Regional Lead in the Osmosis Medical Education Fellowship
“Maybe we think we’re just students and we’re just learning, but you can have an impact as a medical student,” says Dr. Desiree Franco Lugo, who has acted on that insight throughout her recently completed journey at Anáhuac University, Mexico and during her participation in the Osmosis Medical Education Fellowship, where she has served as a Regional Lead for the past two years. Des, as we’ve come to know her, has happily embraced one of the most important roles Regional Leads play: being a mentor to fellow med students. “I love talking to them and seeing how they develop and follow their own dreams. I literally feel like a proud mom with them,” she tells host Hillary Acer. Speaking of which, Hillary, as leader of the OMEF program, has the same pride in all that Des has done to support her peers through hosting events, writing blogs, conducting research and so much more. Beyond Osmosis, Des has developed a global footprint in medical education through internships and being selected to participate in prestigious international conferences. All of those experiences have stoked a previously unknown passion for medical education, and given her confidence to pursue other passions for entrepreneurship and leadership. This is an invigorating conversation in our NextGen Journeys series that underscores what can come from jumping at opportunities, or as Des puts it, having an attitude of ‘less fear and more go for it.’Mentioned in this episode: Osmosis Health Leadership Initiative https://www.osmosis.org/community
Bringing Innovation and Hope to Alzheimer's and Dementia Care: Eleonora Tornatore-Mikesh, Stephani Shivers and Dr. Anne Kenney of CaringKind
May 8 2024
Bringing Innovation and Hope to Alzheimer's and Dementia Care: Eleonora Tornatore-Mikesh, Stephani Shivers and Dr. Anne Kenney of CaringKind
Promising research, a growing respect for the patient voice and innovative ways of using technology to support patients might be adding up to a new reality of Alzheimer’s and other dementias being experienced as chronic diseases like some cancers are now considered to be. We’re going to learn about that trend and other positive developments in the space on this special episode of Raise the Line with the leaders of CaringKind - one of the nation’s premier organizations focused on Alzheimer’s and dementia caregiving - who took time out from preparing for its annual gala on June 3 for an in-depth discussion of what’s new, what’s coming and what’s most important for the individuals and families affected by dementia. One welcome theme is that the voices of those with lived experience are being given more weight. “We're going to see more grassroots-driven change where people living with dementia are not just participants in research, but they are partners in research, and they’re actually pushing policy change," says Chief Innovation Officer Stephani Shivers. Tune in as host Michael Carrese explores advancements in diagnostics and research with CaringKind adviser Dr. Anne Kenney; gets briefed on a new Medicare pilot program from Stephani; and learns about the “Forget-Me-Not” gala -- which includes dancing robots -- from CEO Eleonora Tornatore-Mikesh. “For the gala, we're really excited about weaving in the work that we're diving into in the next couple of years to ‘connect to living’ -- to culture and music, people, science and services. Being able to utilize technology to bring joy and socialization back to your life is part of that.” This is a revealing look at the current and future state of caregiving for diseases that are affecting a rapidly growing number of Americans and their families. Mentioned in this episode: https://www.caringkindnyc.org/gala/
A Revolutionary Moment in Transplant Surgery: Dr. Andrew Cameron, Surgeon-in-Chief of Johns Hopkins Medicine
May 3 2024
A Revolutionary Moment in Transplant Surgery: Dr. Andrew Cameron, Surgeon-in-Chief of Johns Hopkins Medicine
“There is a revolution at hand in which, after years of struggling to locate a new source of organs, there may finally be an answer and to everyone's surprise it is animal organs. Pigs may save the day,” says Dr. Andrew Cameron, chief of the Division of Transplantation at Johns Hopkins Medicine. While he’s encouraged by recent progress in using genetically-modified pig organs in humans, Cameron points to other ways of addressing this chronic shortage which include creative use of social media to raise awareness of the need, and even compensating people for donations. But, as you’ll learn on this episode of Raise the Line with host Shiv Gaglani, running the transplant program is just one of the hats Cameron wears. As director of the Department of Surgery and surgeon-in-chief, he has a hand in overseeing all surgical subspecialties, so Shiv also explores his thoughts on the role of robotics and other technologies in both performing operations and in training surgeons. And in what is perhaps an unexpected turn, Cameron expresses his excitement about non-surgical developments to improve health such as the new class of weight loss drugs. “We're not here for me to do fancy surgeries. We're here to take care of sick people, so if there is a non-operative solution that’s better for the patient, we're all in on that, too.” It’s an expansive and fascinating conversation you won’t want to miss.Mentioned in this episode:Johns Hopkins Department of Surgery: www.hopkinsmedicine.org/surgeryDONOR App: www.thedonorapp.comTEDx Talk on Xenotransplantation
A Mother’s Perspective on Childhood Cancer: Bethan Keall
May 2 2024
A Mother’s Perspective on Childhood Cancer: Bethan Keall
Today’s Raise the Line guest has a simple but powerful message for medical providers, born of a mother’s heartbreak. “It's going to be rare in your career to meet a zebra but the impact you can have is phenomenal. An early diagnosis could make the difference between life and death for these children,” says Bethan Keall who lost her young daughter Matilda (Tilly) in 2022 to neuroblastoma, a rare cancer most commonly found in children. Because some symptoms of the disease can be easily attributed to other causes, early diagnosis is difficult, particularly if providers are not on the lookout for it. Tilly’s diagnosis of an aggressive form of neuroblastoma introduced Bethan and her husband to the unfortunate realities of a lack of funding and coordination in the UK around pediatric oncology. “For childhood cancer you really need as much collaboration among doctors as possible to understand how treatments can get better because there are relatively few cases,” she explains to host Lindsey Smith. In coping with Tilly’s tragic death at the age of four, her parents have dedicated themselves to Neuroblastoma UK to support research efforts and have benefitted from the emotional and social support provided by a charity called Jak’s Den, founded by the family of a victim of childhood cancer. This is a wrenching, illuminating episode in our Year of the Zebra series offering important insights from a parent’s perspective for providers and policymakers alike. Mentioned in this episode: Jak’s Den https://www.teamjak.org.uk/Neuroblastoma UK https://www.neuroblastoma.org.uk/
The Many Paths to Excellence in Emergency Medicine: Dr. Sharon Bord and Dr. Amelia Pousson, Emergency Medicine Clerkship Leaders at Johns Hopkins University
Apr 25 2024
The Many Paths to Excellence in Emergency Medicine: Dr. Sharon Bord and Dr. Amelia Pousson, Emergency Medicine Clerkship Leaders at Johns Hopkins University
Today, we're continuing our close look at clerkships and residency programs and what students can do to be successful in them with Dr. Sharon Bord and Dr. Amelia Pousson, who are both physicians and assistant professors in emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where, as most listeners know, Osmosis co-founder and Raise the Line host Shiv Gaglani is pursuing his third year of medical school. “I think one of the things that students really feel when they rotate in the ED is the team-based atmosphere. Emergency medicine providers help each other be the best versions of ourselves that we can in medicine. That is really unique,” explains Dr. Bord, who serves as the emergency medicine clerkship and sub-internship director. For her part, Dr. Pousson wants students to realize there are many paths to becoming a wonderful emergency physician. “There's lots of ways to sort of peel the orange and get it just right even if the path there looks a little bit different for each person,” she says.  Both agree that among the keys for success are rigorous honesty and self-reflection about your goals and limitations, and whether the specialty is a good fit. Tune in for an expansive conversation that provides valuable wisdom and fascinating insights into one of the most vital and challenging of medical specialties. Mentioned in this episode: Johns Hopkins Core Clerkship in Emergency Medicine
Changing the Culture and Climate of Medicine: Dr. Susan Mackinnon, Director of the Center for Nerve Injury and Paralysis at Washington University School of Medicine
Apr 18 2024
Changing the Culture and Climate of Medicine: Dr. Susan Mackinnon, Director of the Center for Nerve Injury and Paralysis at Washington University School of Medicine
Today’s guest is a trailblazing surgeon who performed the first successful nerve allograft, among other important achievements, but that’s actually not what host Shiv Gaglani wanted to focus on in this interview with Dr. Susan Mackinnon. After seeing her speak recently at a Johns Hopkins Grand Rounds presentation, Shiv immediately asked her to be a guest on Raise the Line because of her passion to change the culture and climate in the medical profession, partly by reconnecting it with its core mission. “We need to get it to a point where you can take the Hippocratic oath, which says if I don't agree to look after the care for prince and slave alike, I should die. We need to get back to that.”  Mackinnon candidly details her own journey to being able to recognize and regulate her energy state so that she can perform at the highest level of creativity with colleagues and rise above the counterproductive “I win, you lose” mindset that often prevails in medicine. This free-flowing conversation is packed with insights gathered over a long career and offers much food for thought about how to find happiness and spur innovation at work, and the importance of self-care for providers. There’s also more book recommendations than in any other Raise the Line episode!Mentioned in this episode: Energy Leadership by Bruce SchneiderTaking the Leap by Pema ChodronWhere Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson
Creating Therapeutic Journeys with Music: Kerry Devlin, MMT, Senior Music Therapist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine
Apr 11 2024
Creating Therapeutic Journeys with Music: Kerry Devlin, MMT, Senior Music Therapist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine
When Raise the Line host and third year medical student Shiv Gaglani witnessed the creation of a “heart song” at the bedside of a terminal patient during his recent neurology clerkship, he immediately wanted to know more about the clinical applications of music therapy and realized the Osmosis audience would want to as well.  That’s why we’re happy to bring you this fascinating episode featuring Shiv’s interview with Kerry Devlin, MMT, a senior music therapist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine. “I like to describe music therapy as a relational therapeutic encounter. Music is both the tool that I'm using as a music therapist, but it's also the medium that we're working in. And we're using that tool and that therapeutic medium to travel together to work towards someone's individualized healthcare goals,” Devlin says. In the case of dying patients, she creates music that incorporates recordings of their heartbeat and breath sounds with their favorite song and gives the result to the family as a keepsake. For other patients, she adapts her work to suit their clinical situation such as taking a rhythmic approach with people dealing with movement disorders or singing with someone with Parkinson’s disease to help them maintain articulation. As you’ll learn, the applications are wide ranging and include group work as well as one-on-one sessions. This is a meaningful and memorable episode you won’t want to miss about a powerful therapeutic tool whose use is growing. Mentioned in this episode: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/center-for-music-and-medicine
Building a New Appreciation for the Value of Nursing: Jennifer Mensik Kennedy, President of the American Nurses Association
Apr 10 2024
Building a New Appreciation for the Value of Nursing: Jennifer Mensik Kennedy, President of the American Nurses Association
We've had the pleasure of speaking to nursing leaders at a variety of health systems and at nursing schools on past episodes of Raise the Line, but today we're going to zoom out for a big picture perspective on the profession and its current and future challenges and opportunities with Jennifer Mensik Kennedy, PhD, RN, MBA, president of the American Nurses Association, which advocates for the nation's 5.5 million RNs. In a frank assessment, Mensik Kennedy says nursing is actually not in need of new ideas to solve the problems it faces. “We've known about the solutions for decades, but yet we for some reason or another have not put those solutions into play,” she explains to host Hillary Acer. Mensik Kennedy thinks the slow pace of progress on issues such as staffing challenges, workplace violence, DEI, burnout and wellbeing can be attributed in part to the fact that only 5% of hospitals have a nurse on the board of directors. “When decisions need to be made, nurses' voices often are not heard or at that table to make needed changes.” Don’t miss this chance to hear a wealth of insight on the true value of nurses from a leader recognized nationally as one of the 100 most influential people in healthcare, and be sure to stay tuned to learn about an innovative “tribrid” model of delivering care.Mentioned in this episode: https://www.nursingworld.org/ana/