The Scientist’s LabTalk

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The Scientist’s LabTalk is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team where we explore topics at the leading edge of innovative research.

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The Human Data Era - The Role of Human Diversity in Progressing Precision Medicine
Nov 9 2022
The Human Data Era - The Role of Human Diversity in Progressing Precision Medicine
By understanding disease risk through the information found in a person’s genome, scientists can develop more effective therapeutics and clinicians can treat their patients more effectively. In this episode, we talk to Kári Stefánsson, founder and CEO of deCODE Genetics, a Reykjavik-based biopharmaceutical company that collects and analyzes genealogical, medical, and genomic data at a national scale in order to identify variants that cause disease. We discuss his pioneering work in population-scale genetics, its applications in precision medicine and the healthcare system, and the difficult questions that access to these data raise. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Human Data Era Q&A webinar discussion on November 16, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to The Human Data Era, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines.   By studying human genetics, scientists discovered mechanisms that, when defective, cause disease. While this type of data is powerful, additional information can provide more insight on the human condition. Researchers and clinicians can now go beyond genetics, combining proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and environmental factors into a broad category of human data. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, explores the potential of human data and the important transition scientists and clinicians are making to incorporate this wealth of information into drug research and development.
The Human Data Era - The Role of Human Diversity in Progressing Precision Medicine
Nov 9 2022
The Human Data Era - The Role of Human Diversity in Progressing Precision Medicine
By understanding disease risk through the information found in a person’s genome, scientists can develop more effective therapeutics and clinicians can treat their patients more effectively. In this episode, we talk to Kári Stefánsson, founder and CEO of deCODE Genetics, a Reykjavik-based biopharmaceutical company that collects and analyzes genealogical, medical, and genomic data at a national scale in order to identify variants that cause disease. We discuss his pioneering work in population-scale genetics, its applications in precision medicine and the healthcare system, and the difficult questions that access to these data raise. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Human Data Era Q&A webinar discussion on November 16, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to The Human Data Era, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines.   By studying human genetics, scientists discovered mechanisms that, when defective, cause disease. While this type of data is powerful, additional information can provide more insight on the human condition. Researchers and clinicians can now go beyond genetics, combining proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and environmental factors into a broad category of human data. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, explores the potential of human data and the important transition scientists and clinicians are making to incorporate this wealth of information into drug research and development.
The Human Data Era - Exploring Human Data in Cardiovascular Disease
Nov 2 2022
The Human Data Era - Exploring Human Data in Cardiovascular Disease
Heterogeneous disorders such as cardiovascular disease have multiple risk factors, causes, and manifestations. Having a holistic view of a patient’s unique biology potentially leads to earlier and better treatment options. In this episode, we talk to Narimon Honarpour, vice president of Global Development at Amgen, about how human data is helping drug developers and clinicians unpack the complexities of cardiovascular disease to improve patient outcomes. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Human Data Era Q&A webinar discussion on November 16, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to The Human Data Era, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines.   By studying human genetics, scientists discovered mechanisms that, when defective, cause disease. While this type of data is powerful, additional information can provide more insight on the human condition. Researchers and clinicians can now go beyond genetics, combining proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and environmental factors into a broad category of human data. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, explores the potential of human data and the important transition scientists and clinicians are making to incorporate this wealth of information into drug research and development.
The Human Data Era - New Connections Between Genetics and Human Disease
Oct 26 2022
The Human Data Era - New Connections Between Genetics and Human Disease
Biobanks that house data from electronic health records or collect samples directly from participants are precious resources for researchers looking to understand health and disease and translate these discoveries into recommendations and treatments for patients. In this episode, we talk to Nancy Cox, professor and director of the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute, about Vanderbilt’s DNA biobank, BioVU. Nancy and her fellow researchers use computational genetics to study the de-identified patient DNA stored in the bank along with corresponding electronic health records in order to discover links between genes and disease. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Human Data Era Q&A webinar discussion on November 16, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to The Human Data Era, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines.   By studying human genetics, scientists discovered mechanisms that, when defective, cause disease. While this type of data is powerful, additional information can provide more insight on the human condition. Researchers and clinicians can now go beyond genetics, combining proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and environmental factors into a broad category of human data. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, explores the potential of human data and the important transition scientists and clinicians are making to incorporate this wealth of information into drug research and development.
The Human Data Era - Human Data: Beyond the Genome
Oct 19 2022
The Human Data Era - Human Data: Beyond the Genome
Welcome to The Human Data Era, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines.   By studying human genetics, scientists discovered mechanisms that, when defective, cause disease. While this type of data is powerful, additional information can provide more insight on the human condition. Researchers and clinicians can now go beyond genetics, combining proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and environmental factors into a broad category of human data. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, explores the potential of human data and the important transition scientists and clinicians are making to incorporate this wealth of information into drug research and development.    With a whole host of patient data at our fingertips, drug developers are becoming more thoughtful and strategic in developing medicines and designing clinical trials to test them. In this episode we talk to Rob Lenz, Senior Vice President of Global Development at Amgen. We review the full scope of human data, going beyond the genome to explore the challenges of using human data as well as the opportunities of applying human data to drug research and clinical trials. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Human Data Era Q&A webinar discussion on November 16, 2022. Register for the event here.
Innovating Clinical Trials: Real-World Clinical Trial Design and Execution in Oncology
Sep 21 2022
Innovating Clinical Trials: Real-World Clinical Trial Design and Execution in Oncology
Cancer is one therapeutic area where patients cannot wait the conventional 10 or 12 years for a new therapy. For these patients, time is of the essence, and improved access to faster clinical trials can be the difference between receiving a new life-saving medicine and it being too late. In this episode, we talk to David Raben, vice president of Global Development Oncology at Amgen, about the next generation of oncology trial design and execution. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Innovating Clinical Trials Q&A webinar discussion on September 28, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to Innovating Clinical Trials, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Clinical trials are desperate for innovation. Speed and efficiency need to improve as many patients cannot wait over a decade for new, potentially lifesaving medicines, and trial participants often do not reflect the patient population. Because clinical trials are complex and multidisciplinary, there is not a single, simple solution for accelerating progress. In this series, Rob Lenz, senior vice president of Global Development at Amgen, explores the latest approaches in clinical trial design and execution and highlights real-world examples of how scientists can run trials better and faster to develop optimal medicines that benefit patients.
Innovating Clinical Trials: The Right Patients
Sep 14 2022
Innovating Clinical Trials: The Right Patients
With advances in genetics and other human data, researchers and doctors will one day be able to practice precision medicine. However, predicting how a patient will respond to a medicine is challenging in under-represented patients who are often not included in clinical trials. This is due in part to systemic issues that deter people from participating in research, especially those who have been historically excluded due to factors such as race, ethnicity, sex, and age. In this episode, we talk to Ponda Motsepe-Ditshego, vice president and Global Medical Therapeutic Area head in General Medicine at Amgen, about the recognized differences in disease incidence among racial and ethnic groups and new approaches to increase representation in clinical trials.  To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Innovating Clinical Trials Q&A webinar discussion on September 28, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to Innovating Clinical Trials, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Clinical trials are desperate for innovation. Speed and efficiency need to improve as many patients cannot wait over a decade for new, potentially lifesaving medicines, and trial participants often do not reflect the patient population. Because clinical trials are complex and multidisciplinary, there is not a single, simple solution for accelerating progress. In this series, Rob Lenz, senior vice president of Global Development at Amgen, explores the latest approaches in clinical trial design and execution and highlights real-world examples of how scientists can run trials better and faster to develop optimal medicines that benefit patients.
Innovating Clinical Trials: Real World Data in Drug Development
Sep 7 2022
Innovating Clinical Trials: Real World Data in Drug Development
Randomized clinical trials are the gold standard for evaluating the efficacy and safety of medicines, but they come with many drawbacks including high monetary and time costs, a lack of representation compared to the general public, and ethical limitations. Historically, these trials were the main mechanism to understand the effects of a medicine. But more recently, real world data from sources such as electronic health records, insurance claims and billing activities, disease registries, and wearable devices, is having a greater effect on understanding a medicine’s usage and effects. Although this information is collected outside of clinical trials, clinical researchers incorporate it during the earliest phases of clinical development to gain additional information and speed up the drug development process. In this episode, we talk to Brian Bradbury, vice president of the Center for Observational Research at Amgen, about the increased utilization of real world data and its potential to revolutionize every stage of clinical research, from trial design to regulatory requirements to outcomes measurement. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Innovating Clinical Trials Q&A webinar discussion on September 28, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to Innovating Clinical Trials, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Clinical trials are desperate for innovation. Speed and efficiency need to improve as many patients cannot wait over a decade for new, potentially lifesaving medicines, and trial participants often do not reflect the patient population. Because clinical trials are complex and multidisciplinary, there is not a single, simple solution for accelerating progress. In this series, Rob Lenz, senior vice president of Global Development at Amgen, explores the latest approaches in clinical trial design and execution and highlights real-world examples of how scientists can run trials better and faster to develop optimal medicines that benefit patients.
Innovating Clinical Trials: Operational Innovation
Aug 31 2022
Innovating Clinical Trials: Operational Innovation
Welcome to Innovating Clinical Trials, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Clinical trials are desperate for innovation. Speed and efficiency need to improve as many patients cannot wait over a decade for new, potentially lifesaving medicines, and trial participants often do not reflect the patient population. Because clinical trials are complex and multidisciplinary, there is not a single, simple solution for accelerating progress. In this series, Rob Lenz, senior vice president of Global Development at Amgen, explores the latest approaches in clinical trial design and execution and highlights real-world examples of how scientists can run trials better and faster to develop optimal medicines that benefit patients.   Our understanding of human biology and disease is progressing at an unprecedented pace, and clinical trial development and execution needs to evolve just as quickly to deliver potentially lifesaving medicines to patients who can't wait. We also need to recruit underrepresented patients into trials, which requires us to think differently about how we identify and recruit patients. In this episode, we talk to Cynthia Verst, president of Design and Delivery Innovation for Research & Development Solutions at IQVIA, a global provider of advanced analytics, technology solutions, and clinical research services. We discuss the drivers for applying innovation in the trial execution space and how the clinical trials model is evolving across the industry thanks to modern innovations. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Innovating Clinical Trials Q&A webinar discussion on September 28, 2022. Register for the event here.
The Generative Biology Revolution: Accelerating Drug Discovery with Protein Design
Jul 13 2022
The Generative Biology Revolution: Accelerating Drug Discovery with Protein Design
The ability to design proteins to perform desired functions will transform drug development. In particular, with AI and machine learning, scientists gain the ability to engineer antibody-based drugs, including multispecifics which engage multiple targets. By altering existing protein structures or developing proteins de novo, biologics will become more effective and specific. In this episode, we talk to Suzanne Edavettal, the executive director of Protein Engineering at Amgen. We discuss how protein design affects drug development and success rates in the clinic today and in the future. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Generative Biology Q&A webinar discussion on July 20th, 2022. Register for the event here.   The Generative Biology Revolution is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Generative biology is a revolutionary approach to drug discovery and development that leverages machine learning and AI to design novel protein therapeutics. It holds the potential to enhance the speed and efficiency of discovery. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, discusses how generative biology is transforming drug discovery to make it more predictable, shorten timelines, and increase success rates of bringing life-saving medicines to patients who need them most.
The Generative Biology Revolution: Protein Design from Scratch
Jul 6 2022
The Generative Biology Revolution: Protein Design from Scratch
Naturally-occurring proteins have evolved over millions of years to perform specific functions based on their sequences and folded structures. As our understanding of science advanced, researchers began designing proteins from scratch to solve new challenges that modern societies face.  In this episode, we talk to David Baker, director of the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington and one of the creators of the RoseTTAFold protein structure prediction tool. We discuss how to design proteins with sequences and structures that impart novel functions and how designed proteins will revolutionize drug development. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Generative Biology Q&A webinar discussion on July 20th, 2022. Register for the event here.   The Generative Biology Revolution is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Generative biology is a revolutionary approach to drug discovery and development that leverages machine learning and AI to design novel protein therapeutics. It holds the potential to enhance the speed and efficiency of discovery. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, discusses how generative biology is transforming drug discovery to make it more predictable, shorten timelines, and increase success rates of bringing life-saving medicines to patients who need them most.
The Generative Biology Revolution: The Protein Structure Prediction Problem
Jun 29 2022
The Generative Biology Revolution: The Protein Structure Prediction Problem
To build better biologic drugs, researchers need to understand exactly how amino acid building blocks interact with one another and fold into functional proteins. This knowledge provides insights into how to engage a drug target or develop an optimal therapeutic. Determining a protein’s structure is a laborious process in the wet lab, but thanks to machine learning, scientists can now use various algorithms to predict structure.  In this episode, we talk to Mike Nohaile, chief scientific officer at Generate Biomedicines. Since early 2022, Amgen and Generate Biomedicines have been collaborating to discover and create protein therapeutics across several therapeutic areas and multiple modalities, including monoclonal and bispecific antibody drugs. We discuss the challenge of predicting a protein’s structure from its sequence and the steps drug developers are now taking to create novel structures with therapeutic potential using generative biology. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Generative Biology Q&A webinar discussion on July 20th, 2022. Register for the event here. The Generative Biology Revolution is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Generative biology is a revolutionary approach to drug discovery and development that leverages machine learning and AI to design novel protein therapeutics. It holds the potential to enhance the speed and efficiency of discovery. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, discusses how generative biology is transforming drug discovery to make it more predictable, shorten timelines, and increase success rates of bringing life-saving medicines to patients who need them most.
The Generative Biology Revolution: The Cresting Wave of Transformational Science
Jun 22 2022
The Generative Biology Revolution: The Cresting Wave of Transformational Science
In 2021, the world changed for drug research and discovery when researchers published advances that used AI and machine learning to predict the structure of human proteins from their sequences. With discoveries like this, scientists are launching the generative biology revolution where they strive to leave the guesswork behind and instead use computers to quickly tailor biological molecules for therapeutic purposes. In this episode, we speak with Alan Russell, vice president of Biologics at Amgen and review what generative biology is and how it helps scientists understand proteins from their amino acid building blocks to their folded, three-dimensional structures. We also discuss how this new field improves the quality and complexity of biologic drug candidates and the speed with which researchers generate them. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Generative Biology Q&A webinar discussion on July 20th, 2022. Register for the event here.   Welcome to The Generative Biology Revolution, a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Generative biology is a revolutionary approach to drug discovery and development that leverages machine learning and AI to design novel protein therapeutics. It holds the potential to enhance the speed and efficiency of discovery. In this series, Ray Deshaies, senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, discusses how generative biology is transforming drug discovery to make it more predictable, shorten timelines, and increase success rates of bringing life-saving medicines to patients who need them most.
Undruggable: Induced Proximity for Cancer and Beyond
Nov 17 2021
Undruggable: Induced Proximity for Cancer and Beyond
Induced proximity makes it possible for scientists to attack undruggable targets by designing medicines that go beyond what conventional drugs can accomplish. Within the next decade, this work could yield new options for treatments for cancer and other diseases that currently have poor prognoses. People whose serious diseases don’t respond to conventional medicines, or who run out of options, may see induced proximity drugs come to the rescue. In this episode, Ray Deshaies is joined by David Reese, executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. Dave is responsible for Amgen’s entire pipeline of potential therapies, and he has had a long-standing interest in oncology, both at Amgen and in his pre-Amgen career in academic research and medical practice.   Undruggable is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Beginning with the introduction of aspirin at the start of the 20th century, there have been three major waves of innovation in drug discovery. While breakthrough discoveries have been made, 85% of disease targets are still considered undruggable, which represents an ongoing barrier to discovering medicines for complex diseases like cancer and autoimmune conditions. Ray Deshaies, who has spent decades in academic research and is a senior vice president at Amgen, believes that the fourth wave of innovation is here, led by new types of multispecific medicines that will radically alter our concept of how drugs can work and pave the way for new solutions.
Undruggable: The Emerging Induced Proximity Toolkit
Nov 10 2021
Undruggable: The Emerging Induced Proximity Toolkit
PROTACs have taken center stage in the effort to drug the undruggable. Researchers are now exploring other types of TACs to degrade or alter undruggable targets by bringing them together with effector proteins. In this episode, Ray Deshaies talks to Carolyn Bertozzi, professor of chemistry at Stanford University, about alternative induced proximity platforms. Notably, her research centers around lysosome targeting chimeras, or LYTACs, that target extracellular proteins for degradation by the endosome-lysosome pathway. To dive further into this topic, please join Amgen scientists at the Undruggable Q&A webinar discussion on November 17, 2021. Register for this event here: Undruggable Q&A   Undruggable is a special edition podcast series produced by The Scientist’s Creative Services Team. This series is brought to you by Amgen, a pioneer in the science of using living cells to make biologic medicines. They helped invent the processes and tools that built the global biotech industry, and have since reached millions of patients suffering from serious illnesses around the world with their medicines. Beginning with the introduction of aspirin at the start of the 20th century, there have been three major waves of innovation in drug discovery. While breakthrough discoveries have been made, 85% of disease targets are still considered undruggable, which represents an ongoing barrier to discovering medicines for complex diseases like cancer and autoimmune conditions. Ray Deshaies, who has spent decades in academic research and is a senior vice president at Amgen, believes that the fourth wave of innovation is here, led by new types of multispecific medicines that will radically alter our concept of how drugs can work and pave the way for new solutions.