Our Rivers

Forever Our Rivers Foundation

The Our Rivers Podcast features the people making a difference for river health in the western United States and is brought to you by the Forever Our Rivers Foundation. Look for our logo to support the businesses that fund healthy rivers. For more information about our work, visit www.foreverourrivers.org.

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Planet Women and The Overflight Project - Indigenous storytelling in the Colorado River Basin takes flight
Jun 13 2022
Planet Women and The Overflight Project - Indigenous storytelling in the Colorado River Basin takes flight
Planet Women envisions a world where the vibrant diversity of earth’s people collaborate to care for the planet. Currently, the organization is focused on three geographic areas defined by rivers —  the Congo, Amazon, and Colorado River Basins. Each area has an immense influence over global climate patterns and biodiversity or an outsized impact on the communities that depend on them.Of course, since Forever Our Rivers works in the southwestern United States, we're most interested in Planet Women's work along the Colorado River. And this podcast centers on their innovative Overflight Project. The initiative pairs volunteer women pilots with indigenous women leaders and youth from in and around the Colorado River Basin. The pilots then fly the women over their homelands, sparking inspiration and storytelling along the way. Planet Women plans to capture and share these stories of a landscape in the midst of aridification as seen through the eyes of indigenous women in flight. To learn more and to see photos from the flights and their progress across the Basin, visit the Overflight Storymap. In this episode, we talk to  Joanna Marshall, Planet Women's director of development and marketing, and Amber Gray, a pilot and the Overflight Project's aviation operations director. We also speak to Crystal Tulley-Cordova of the Navajo Nation and the Indigenous Women's Leadership Network. Crystal is a principal hydrologist for the Navajo Nation and a participant in the Overflight program. If you are or know of indigenous woman leaders or youth who would like to participate in the Overflight Project email TheOverflightProject@gmail.com.Fact-checking notes: In this episode, we briefly discuss the amount of oil that the United States and California import from the Amazon. We cite a 2021 study as reported by NBC News in an article titled, Crude reality: One U.S. state consumes half of the oil from the Amazon rainforest, and the California Energy Commission's Foreign Sources of Crude Oil Imports to California 2021. Support the show
Planet Women and The Overflight Project - Indigenous storytelling in the Colorado River Basin takes flight
Jun 13 2022
Planet Women and The Overflight Project - Indigenous storytelling in the Colorado River Basin takes flight
Planet Women envisions a world where the vibrant diversity of earth’s people collaborate to care for the planet. Currently, the organization is focused on three geographic areas defined by rivers —  the Congo, Amazon, and Colorado River Basins. Each area has an immense influence over global climate patterns and biodiversity or an outsized impact on the communities that depend on them.Of course, since Forever Our Rivers works in the southwestern United States, we're most interested in Planet Women's work along the Colorado River. And this podcast centers on their innovative Overflight Project. The initiative pairs volunteer women pilots with indigenous women leaders and youth from in and around the Colorado River Basin. The pilots then fly the women over their homelands, sparking inspiration and storytelling along the way. Planet Women plans to capture and share these stories of a landscape in the midst of aridification as seen through the eyes of indigenous women in flight. To learn more and to see photos from the flights and their progress across the Basin, visit the Overflight Storymap. In this episode, we talk to  Joanna Marshall, Planet Women's director of development and marketing, and Amber Gray, a pilot and the Overflight Project's aviation operations director. We also speak to Crystal Tulley-Cordova of the Navajo Nation and the Indigenous Women's Leadership Network. Crystal is a principal hydrologist for the Navajo Nation and a participant in the Overflight program. If you are or know of indigenous woman leaders or youth who would like to participate in the Overflight Project email TheOverflightProject@gmail.com.Fact-checking notes: In this episode, we briefly discuss the amount of oil that the United States and California import from the Amazon. We cite a 2021 study as reported by NBC News in an article titled, Crude reality: One U.S. state consumes half of the oil from the Amazon rainforest, and the California Energy Commission's Foreign Sources of Crude Oil Imports to California 2021. Support the show
Rivers Through Canyons, Recreating responsibly in western Colorado
Apr 26 2021
Rivers Through Canyons, Recreating responsibly in western Colorado
In this episode, we sit down with Collin Ewing, manager of the McInnis Canyons, and Dominguez-Escalante National Conservation Areas for the Bureau of Land Management.  These public lands are stunning, with towering red rock canyons and two beautiful stretches of river, the Ruby Horsethief section of the Colorado and the lower Gunnison River. As COVID-19 encourages people to get outside, the Bureau is working to manage the increased pressure on the landscape. We talk to Collin about how he's helping to preserve the wilderness experience for visitors and protect habitat as the crowds swell. In 2016, the Bureau launched a permit system on Ruby-Horsethief. It helped preserve the area’s wilderness feel, protect the landscape from overuse, and raise funds to keep restrooms clean, build infrastructure like boat ramps, and restore habitat. The Bureau is currently working on a similar system for the Lower Gunnison River. Collin would love to hear your comments and suggestions. We also hit the highlights of a few Leave No Trace practices, like reading about the rules and regulations for your destination before you go. The Colorado Canyons Association has some handy resources for McInnis Canyon specifically. Check out their “Know Before You Go” video for the Ruby-Horsethief section of the Colorado River. And don’t forget to,Stay on designated roads and trailsCamp in designated campsitesUse designated fire rings And have a plan for your pooCollin is also heading down the Grand Canyon this summer and walks us through his plan to mitigate Covid risks. These conversations will help you recreate responsibly on any public lands trip you’re planning this summer. Additional Resources -Learn more about our National Conservation Lands and National Conservation Areas (NCAs) and the stunning Dominguez-Escalante and McInnis Canyon NCAs.Research the current water level in the river you want to explore.Check out the Mesa County Health Department’s Covid guidelines if you’re planning to visit McInnis Canyons or Dominguez-Escalante National Conservation Areas. Here are some National Park Service  tips to recreate responsibly in Covid-timesAnd here are more resources to help you recreate responsibly. Email topics, comments, and suggestions to clark@foreverourrivers.org. Or leave us a river question at ‪(724) 343-1769 to have your question air in an episode.SOL Paddle Boards High-performing, durable paddle boards designed in Telluride, Colorado for your next adventure. Support the show (