Attendance Bias

Brian Weinstein

Attendance Bias is a podcast for fans to tell a story about an especially meaningful Phish show.

11/16/96 Set 2 in Omaha w/ Chris from Just Jams
Sep 21 2022
11/16/96 Set 2 in Omaha w/ Chris from Just Jams
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Today’s guest is Chris from the Phish Just Jams website and app. We all love Phish songs, but sometimes you just want to get straight to the jams, and that’s what Chris, and his brother Brian, created: a database that allows fans to do just that.  In addition to Just Jams, Chris is here to talk about the second set of an out-of-nowhere, or in the middle of nowhere, show: November 16, 1996 at the Civic Auditorium in Omaha, Nebraska. 1996 has taken a little bit of a beating on this podcast and in general when it comes to Phish. We’ll get into it deeper, but myself and many guests have referred to 1996 as an “off year” or an “in between year” when it comes to Phish’s development. I’ve certainly realized the folly in that description, and according to Chris, it this type of show that caused that type of generalization in the first place. While the 2nd set is everything anyone could ever want in a Phish show, the first set is nothing remarkable. So in a time when it wasn’t so easy to just pick and choose which part of a show you wanted to hear, anyone listening to this first set may incorrectly assume that there’s nothing special about the show in general. That’s one reason that we are reviewing just the second set of this 1996 show in Omaha.  So let’s join Chris to talk about Trey’s percussion setup, standing up during Kung, and turkey legs as we discuss the second set of Phish’s performance from November 16, 1996 at the Omaha Civic Auditorium.
7/21/91 @ Arrowhead Ranch w/ Carl Gerhard
Sep 7 2022
7/21/91 @ Arrowhead Ranch w/ Carl Gerhard
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. We have a very special guest for today’s episode. For the most part, Attendance Bias is focused on fans of the band, and each fan tells his or her story. But once in a long while, a person directly associated with the band will come on the podcast to talk about their history with Phish and to break down a special show or jam. Tom Marshall has been on the pod, Sue Drew who was the band’s A&R rep at Elektra Records told her story, and today’s guest ranks right up there in his ability to tell about his Phish experience from the inside out. And today’s guest is member of the Giant Country Horns and current trumpet player for Roomful of Blues, Carl “Gears” Gerhard. Carl chose to tell about his gig with Phish at Arrowhead Ranch, NY, on July 21, 1991.If you got into Phish at a time when tape collecting was still part of the experience, there is no doubt that this gig came across your radar at some point. The second of two shows, this fan favorite was the midway point of the July 1991 horn tour, and you could tell that the band–the full band–was feeling it, full throttle. Aside from the music, though, a main goal of this podcast is to help the listener feel as though he or she is right there with the guest, feeling and experiencing the show that’s being discussed. What makes today’s episode special is that Carl is able to get us backstage and onstage with Phish as he tells us about the conversations and decisions that led to the horn tour, and what it felt like to collaborate with Phish and the other members of the Giant Country Horns. More important than anything, though, is that Carl was extremely generous with his time and his words, welcoming us into the world that was Phish tour in the early 90s.So let’s join Carl to talk about Tony Bennett, life in the Navy, and 48 hour marathon rehearsals, as we discuss Phish's show from 7/21/91 at Arrowhead Ranch.
8/15/12 @ Long Beach Arena w/ Jack and Frazer of PhanSets
Aug 31 2022
8/15/12 @ Long Beach Arena w/ Jack and Frazer of PhanSets
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Today’s guests are Jack and Fraser of PhanSets.com, who are here to tell about their NFT startup, Phansets, as well as their chosen attendance bias show: August 15, 2012 at Long Beach Arena, in Long Beach, CA. If you got into Phish at a certain time in their history, you probably obtained a tape, or if you’re like me, hundreds of tapes. Everything about obtaining a tape was special: finding someone who had a tape you were looking for; reaching out to that person whether it was by a letter, a forum, or an email, agreeing to a trade or a B+P, and then when the tape arrived in the mail, the most unique thing about it, aside from the music, was the J-Card; the little piece of paper or thin cardboard that listed the set of music found on that tape. Everyone had their own special ritual and preferences when it came to the J-Cards. If you pretty much fetishized the tapes as much as I did, then you may have had special symbols to denote a segue, or a song debut, or a special guest, and so on.Tapes have long vanished from the typical Phish scene, but Frazer and Jack of Phansets have dug deep into that nostalgic part of being a fan and want to update it to the present by using the concept of NFTs. In a minute, you’ll hear both guests explain how PhanSets brings back the love of special sets and JCards. But before then, we don’t want to forget the show!Jack and Fraser were lucky enough to attend the August 15, 2012 show in Long Beach with some special guests; probably the biggest pop stars in the world at that time. So while you listen to today’s episode, imagine that you’re at the show. Now imagine that your brother in law is Justin Bieber’s musical director and guitarist. Now imagine that you and your brother in law convinced Justin Bieber to come see Phish with you. I don’t want to spoil the best parts, but you see where this is going.So let’s join Frazer and Jack to talk about Phish Sets, Southern California venues, and the limits of an all-access pass as we discuss Phish’s performance from August 15, 2012 at the Long Beach Arena.
"The Moma Dance" from 10/29/14 @ The BGCA w/Michela Ratto
Jul 13 2022
"The Moma Dance" from 10/29/14 @ The BGCA w/Michela Ratto
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Today’s guest is Michela Ratto of New York, by way of San Francisco. For today’s episode, Michela chose to discuss Phish’s performance of “The Moma Dance” with a segue into “We Are the Champions” by Queen from the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco on October 29, 2014.Baseball has come up a number of times on this podcast, most notably with Hal Hansen, who chose to discuss Phish’s show from June 28, 2000 at the Garden State Arts Center. The baseball aspect of that conversation was more about the comparison of obsessed Phish fans with statistic minded baseball savants. Today’s talk with Michela goes a lot deeper and more specific than that, as she brings up the specific feeling of what it was like to be in San Francisco, rooting for her hometown team in the World Series at a Phish show, and what it’s like when they clinch the championship right at the start of the second set. But that’s just one part of it. Today’s conversation covers a lot of ground as we discuss the fall 2014 tour, sisterhood, working at Chili’s, and so much more. On top of that, there are those times at shows when something even bigger than Phish is going on in the city they’re playing and yet they manage to fuse it into their playing, harnessing the excitement in the air both outside and inside the venue. For Michela and San Francisco Giants fans at the Bill Graham, this was one of those nights.  You’ll also hear Michela mention a few times that she and I go to a lot of shows together–there’s a good reason for that. We’re engaged! By the time this episode airs, she and I should be on our way to getting married, so this was a personal interview in a lot of ways.But that’s a bigger story even than Phish. So in the meantime, let’s join Michela to chat about the best sandwiches in Saratoga Springs, the king of ground scores, and JT Snow saving the life of a young child as we go over “The Moma Dance from October 29, 2014 at The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco.Audio Used in Today's EpisodePYM Anxiety Chews
"If I Could" -- 10/11/95 @ The Compton Terrace Amphitheater with Robert Miller
Jun 22 2022
"If I Could" -- 10/11/95 @ The Compton Terrace Amphitheater with Robert Miller
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Today’s guest is Robert Miller. I love every episode of Attendance Bias, and while hosting this podcast, it’s become clear that the word “special” or “meaningful” means something different for every Phish fan. Some people want to talk about their first show, others have a special connection with the venue or city where the show was played, and sometimes, it’s simply a matter of the music. Other times, a fan has a memory and an emotional connection to a particular song played one night. That is the case for today’s episode, where Rob picked “If I Could” from October 11, 1995 at the Compton Terrace Amphitheater in Phoenix, Arizona. Rob was in college at the time, and we’ve all been there; we go on an adventure with someone who starts off as a friend. But during the adventure, we get tunnel vision, and we want the friend to become something more than a friend. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t. But there are times when our favorite band becomes the soundtrack to that memory, and a specific song gains meaning and weight as it somehow describes the situation in the moment.  It’s not always that simple, but it sometimes makes for a good story, and that’s why we are all here today. So let’s join Rob to chat about the fall ‘95 tour, our dream special guests, and when it is and isn’t okay to take a piss break as we break down “If I Could’ from October 11, 1995 at The Compton Terrace Amphitheater in Phoenix.Jambase--Fall '95 By The NumbersAudio Used in This Episode
100th Episode Special!
Jun 15 2022
100th Episode Special!
Hello everyone, and welcome to Attendance Bias! I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Before anything, I want to begin today’s episode with a message of gratitude. A few weeks ago, I put out two requests to you, the attendance bias audience. First, I had to swallow my pride and ask for monetary donations. Attendance Bias, or any podcast, is not free to produce. It does take quite a bit of money to produce each episode on a weekly basis, and I’m happy to cover it, as long as I can. After all, as the listener, you pay for it. Not with money, but with your time and attention. And those are the most important commodities we have, so I am truly grateful to every one of you. If you would still like to donate to keep the lights on at Attendance Bias, you can go to www.buymeacoffee.com/attendancebias and contribute anything you can. Every penny will go to the operating costs of the podcast.Now if you’ve listened to every episode of this podcast, you’ve heard me introduce myself and the episode literally 99 times. That is because today is a special episode. It marks 100 episodes of Attendance Bias, and I cannot believe it. From the day I had the idea of beginning a podcast about Phish and their fans, it took me nearly three months to put one episode together. Now, two years later, we are at the 100th episode of Attendance Bias.For Phish fans, 100 shows is a sort of milestone. In one sense, it’s pointless gatekeeping, as a person’s first, ninth, 57th or 90th show could be just as meaningful as their 100th. But as a culture, we celebrate anniversaries and round numbers, for whatever reason. A couple’s 10 year wedding anniversary. A baseball player’s 20th season. 40 years since a classic album came out, and so on. For Phish fans who are obsessed with statistics, happenstance, coincidence, and and date numerology, 100 shows takes on a significance that could mean everything and nothing at the same time.I fell victim to this, for sure. When Phish announced their 2016 holiday run at Madison Square Garden, I took a look at my stats and realized that my 100th show would be on the same date, at the same venue as my first: it would be on December 29, 2016, exactly 19 years after my first show on December 29, 1997. What did this mean? Double rainbow? It meant that that the Phish gods somehow conspired to make this incredible coincidence…or it just meant that I’ve lived in the NYC area for virtually my entire life and it was only a matter of time? Either way, I was so jazzed about it that I began to write a blog called Phish100. In it, I detailed every Phish show I’d seen, leading up to my 100th. In many ways, it was a precursor to Attendance Bias. The biggest difference, though, was that Phish100 was entirely about my experience at Phish. Attendance Bias is about the guest’s experience at his or her special show. So how does this 100 show threshold translate to a podcast? The fetish for round numbers holds tight in this case, but again, Attendance Bias isn’t really about me–it’s about the audience. So for today’s celebration of 100 episodes of Attendance Bias, I wanted to split the stories. For the first half of today’s episode, I’ll review my 100th show on December 29, 2016 and then for the second half, I’ll hand it over to the Attendance Bias listeners. So many of you reached out to tell your stories about your 100th Phish show, and I’m thrilled to share them. But first, let’s start with Phish at MSG on December 29 2016 at Madison Square Garden.
12/11/95 @ The CCCC w/ Luke Hall
May 25 2022
12/11/95 @ The CCCC w/ Luke Hall
Hi everybody and welcome to this week’s episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. Today’s guest is Luke Hall, and he is here to talk about an old-school favorite: December 11, 1995 at the Cumberland County Civic Center. I love speaking and learning from all different kinds of guests on Attendance Bias, and Luke offered a new perspective; one which I haven’t heard before: Luke is Canadian! And while that isn’t wildly different from any other fan, it does offer a unique perspective. Phish isn’t huge in Canada, and they rarely play the country these days. There’s nothing new about a person getting into Phish when they weren’t well-known, but imagine if you were learning about Phish and there was barely any interest on a NATIONAL scale, let alone a local scale. Throw in the fact that Luke first got into Phish during the mid-90s, when Phish was just becoming nationally known in America, and there’s a perspective certainly worth hearing.Plus, Luke picked a show that is considered a Phish classic–December 11, 1995 at the Cumberland County Civic Center–that features many Phish classics at the end of one of their best tours, as well as Dog Log goofiness and a guest appearance by Warren Haynes, and both of us had lots to say.So let’s join Luke to talk about Fall ‘95, Canadian/American exchange rates, and when we should expect an officially released Dog Log album, as we discuss Phish’s performance on December 11, 1995 at The Cumberland County Civic Center in Portland, Maine.Audio Used in Today's Episode