PODCAST

Knowledge on the Go

Vizient Performance Improvement Collaborative

The Vizient PI Collaboratives team hosts podcasts throughout the year on issues related to leading and managing systems, engaging your workforce and optimizing care delivery.

Digital Technologies for Behavioral HealthWorkplace Violence – Part 3Workplace Violence – Part 2Workplace Violence – Part 1High Reliability: Strategies to Reduce Patient Falls
High Reliability Organizations are organizations that experiences success in avoiding harm within a highly complex and risky business.  This podcast will discuss how one participant of the Vizient High Reliability PI Collaborative reduced their patient falls.   Guest speakers: Bert Lindsey, PT, DH Director of Rehab Services & Patient Mobility, Acute Saint Tammany Health System   Rebecca Baradell Rehab Manager for Acute Care Saint Tammany Health System   Moderator: Marilyn Sherrill, RN, MBA PI Program Director Vizient   For more information, email picollaboratives@vizientinc.com   Show Notes: [01:30] Saint Tammany uses new graduates as mobility technicians to increase patient rounding and mobility assessment. [3:10] Saint Tammany uses Weick and Sutcliffe’s pre-occupation with failure techniques. They train their young, just out of college, staff to expect errors and to work on repeatable results.  [4:30] GEM (Greenville Early Mobility) is a four-integer scoring system developed by a group of physical therapists to aid acute care nurses by assigning patients to a level of mobility. [5:35] Saint Tammany uses the GEMs as part of their Progressive Mobility Program which is an order set for nurses to mobilize patients to their highest capability twice a day. [6:54] Data showing the correlation between the patient’s mobility and their likelihood to fall [9:03] Mobility technicians look for the 3 P’s: pain, potty and position. [10:09] Communicating patient mobility status with the caregivers [12:30] Getting the program started [14:00] Future plans for improving the Progressive Mobility Program   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Amazon Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Mar 21 2022
18 mins
Colonoscopy Screening TechnologyAI in StrokeEvidence Analysis for Clinical Supply IntegrationCool Technologies for Redesigning Ambulatory CareRapid Diagnosis of SepsisPatient Transitions to Post-Acute CareClinical Documentation Improvement
In this program, Michelle McCormick, Revenue Integrity Director, Clinical Documentation Integrity and Mark LeBlanc, Manager Clinical Documentation Integrity, both at Stanford Health, discuss how they shaped their successful CDI program through the fundamentals of prioritization, clarity and transparency.   Guests: Michelle McCormick, RN, MBA-HCM, BSN, CCDS, CCS, CRCR Revenue Integrity Director, Clinical Documentation Integrity Stanford Health   Mark LeBlanc, RN, MBA, CCDS Manager, Clinical Documentation Integrity Stanford Health   Moderator: Marilyn Sherrill PI Program Director Vizient   For more information, email picollaboratives@vizientinc.com   Show Notes: [00:00 – 01:56]  CDI prioritization [01:57 – 03:09]  When prioritizing DRG’s look for the unusual. [03:10 – 05:05]  Clarity within the reporting process [05:06 – 06:30]  Transparency and how it shapes future improvement initiatives [06:31 – 07:56]  Feedback from their physician partners [07:57 – 09:18]  Meaningful response rate advantages [09:19 – 09:43]  Don’t try and boil the ocean   Disclaimer This presentation is intended for educational purposes only and does not replace independent professional judgment. The statements and opinions expressed are those of the speakers and, unless expressly stated to the contrary, do not represent the views or opinions of Stanford Health Care.  Stanford Health Care does not endorse or assume responsibility for the content, accuracy or completeness of the information presented.   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Amazon Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Nov 1 2021
10 mins
Supply Chain ResiliencySepsis management
Effectively managing sepsis is a challenge in every health care organization, and it has required an extensive and involving program at the medical center for Keck Medicine of USC in Los Angeles. Keeping clinicians, particularly physicians, engaged is crucial to improving clinical outcomes in sepsis patients. This podcast delves into real-world, essential details about how both the work of a physician champion and the use of supporting data have contributed to effective sepsis management.   Guest speakers: Lisa Johnson, DNP, MSN, RN, CENP Director Quality and Outcomes Management USC-Keck Medical Center   Tarina Lee Kang, MD Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine Medical Director, Quality Keck School of Medicine of USC   Tusdi Rodriguez, BSN, RN, OCN Clinical Quality Specialist USC-Keck Medical Center   Moderator: Marilyn Sherrill, MBA, RN PI Program Director Vizient   Show Notes: [00:25] Start of the new sepsis initiative at USC-Keck Medical Center (Lisa Johnson) [01:51] Challenges in prior efforts and changes made (Tusdi Rodriguez) [03:07] Role of the physician champion (Tarina Kang) [03:53] Attitude to take when working with physicians on sepsis – the long game (Kang) [05:29] Value of physician champion in saying what others cannot (Johnson) [06:07] Preparing for the crucial conversation – know the patient (Kang, Rodriguez) [09:10] Rundown of a successful sepsis management framework (Johnson)   Links | Resources: Archived video of PI Collaborative on Sepsis Management Click here Slide presentation from Vizient PI Collaborative on Sepsis Management Click here   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Sep 16 2021
10 mins
Social Determinants of Health
Social determinants of health is a problem that affects all American communities. Every hospital needs to assess their community’s social needs, some do it better than others. This podcast highlights one organization with a unique approach on how to identify individuals with social needs and address those needs.   Guest speakers: Kathryn Bazylewicz Vice President, Marketing and Population Health Cottage Health    Monica Ray Population Health Strategic Development Manager Cottage Health   Host:  Kellie Goodson, MS, CPXP Performance Improvement Program Director Vizient   Show Notes: [00:27] Cottage Health is located in Santa Barbara, California [00:50] Cottage Health has centralized its population health efforts [01:36] Santa Barbara has 12% of the overall population is below the poverty line, and the county has the highest percentage of homeless students and the third highest percentage of families in poverty. [02:08] Ron Werft, Cottage Health CEO, started the organization’s vision for population health [02:08] In 2015, Cottage Health changed their mission statement to include the words, “improve the health of our communities,” and then launched our new organizational focus on population health. [02:33] Cottage Health’s Center for Population Health works to improve health and wellness, focusing on equity for the most vulnerable in their hospitals and in the community. [03:00] Started with a community health needs assessment [03:30] After collecting community data, they published the results on CottageData2go.com   [04:20] Cottage Health staffing for their Center for Population Health [04:55] Cottage Health CEO and population health team conducted “Listening Tours” with up to 250 community members to gather their assessment of the community’s health needs. [06:00] Learned that Cottage Health employees need help too.   [06:35] They set up the Employee Resource Connect to partner with human resources to screen all employees for food, housing, transportation and behavioral health needs. Discovered that 25% of their employees need help. [07:00] Developed a food program for employees. [08:50] Expanded screening to other patient populations.   Links | Resources: Cottage Center for Population Health Click here Cottage Health’s Community Health Needs Assessment Click here Cottage Data2Go Click here Modern Practice podcast, “The effect of COVID-19 on social determinants of health – Part 1” Click here Modern Practice podcast, “The effect of COVID-19 on social determinants of health – Part 2” Click here “Addressing Social Determinants of Health During COVID-19 and Beyond: Leveraging Collaboration and Partnerships,” Shaifali Ray and Karyl Kopaskie Click here “Addressing Social Determinants of Health During COVID-19 and Beyond: Leveraging Data that Matters,” Heather Blonsky Click here Addressing Social Determinants of Health During COVID-19 and Beyond: How to Find Your Organization’s Fit,” Shaifali Ray and Karyl Click here   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Aug 2 2021
11 mins
Capacity managementHigh reliabilityWell-being: Leading your staff during a crisis – Part 2
The Coronavirus pandemic has taken a toll on hospitals and clinicians across the country. As the surge persists, staff stressors increase, and the relentless pressure compounds the seriousness of the problem. This episode reveals how Rush University Medical Center’s Strategic Communications department became a key player in helping the hospital, staff and community cope during the COVID pandemic crisis.   Guest speaker: Anne Burgeson Associate Vice President, Strategic Communications Rush University Medical Center   Moderator: Nicole Spatafora, MS-HSM Senior Director, PI Collaboratives Vizient   Show Notes: [00:27] Rush staff were very stressed as they prepared for “tsunami” of COVID heading their way and their first patient [00:55] Rush set up a Hospital Incident Command to prepare for COVID pandemic [01:50] Volume of positive COVID patients at Rush University Medical Center [02:10] Established a communication plan and collaborated with command center and senior leaders [02:50] Rumors were controlled by transparency and consistency in communications [03:57] Rush used every means possible to spread the latest information – emails, newsletters and intranet accessibility at home, including positive articles, message boards and Q&A [05:08] Senior leaders rounded seven days a week to directly answer questions and thank staff for coming to work and caring for patients in such an amazing way [05:27] Started virtual town hall meetings [06:05] Staff relied on constant and trusted communication [06:49] Engagement survey numbers showed staff were still excited to come and do their jobs [07:30] Robust communication to support community’s knowledge of latest COVID information [08:30] Preparation for emergencies and frequent, reliable communications helped hospitals, staff and people around the world in a meaningful way   Links | Resources: CDC: Stress & Coping Click here AMA: Caring for Health Care workers during a crisis, Creating a resilient organization Click here Harvard Medical School: Strengthening Resiliency in Health Care Providers During the COVID-19 Pandemic Click here American Academy of Pediatrics: TheResilienceProject. We can stop toxic stress Click here   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
May 3 2021
9 mins
Well-being: Leading your staff during a crisis – Part 1
The Coronavirus pandemic has taken a toll on clinicians across the country. As the surge persists, staff stressors increase, and the relentless pressure compounds the seriousness of the problem.  This episode reveals how a new Chief Medical Officer at Loyola Medical Center helped his staff and himself get through this unusual crisis event.   Guest speaker: Kevin Smith, MD, MBA (Guest) Chief Medical Officer Loyola University Medical Center   Moderator: Nicole Spatafora, MS-HSM  Senior Director, PI Collaboratives Vizient   Show Notes: [00:19] Loyola staff felt fear and confusion when COVID hit [00:56] Kevin Smith was a new Chief Medical Officer when the pandemic hit [01:18] Leadership team was new to Loyola [01:48] Leadership stayed on campus to work through problems, and developed trust in each other [02:34] Leadership tried to reassure staff they were being as transparent as possible [03:05] Physicians wanted to hear from their local leader, but message had to be consistent with other messages [03:38] Started virtual town halls [04:00] Daily huddles with leadership [04:25] Loyola’s three hospitals coordinated care with thee times a week leadership calls, forming a tight, regional bond [05:16] Lessons learned as a leader who brought his staff through a crisis event   Links | Resources: American Psychological Association: Building your resilience  Click Here CDC: Stress & Coping Click Here AMA: Caring for Health Care workers during a crisis, Creating a resilient organization  Click Here Harvard Medical School: Strengthening Resiliency in Health Care Providers During the COVID-19 Pandemic Click Here   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Apr 5 2021
7 mins
Managing high utilizers
Patients who are high utilizers, also known as multi-visit patients (MVPs) or frequent flyers, whether found in the ED, inpatient units or other departments, drive up readmission rates and tie up resources. Often, clinicians and administrators hold out little hope that they can end the multi-visit cycles of these patients. Yet, by looking at a patient’s multiple visits as a symptom of a deeper problem, and then identifying and rectifying that underlying problem, clinicians can end a patient’s cycle of care utilization.   On this podcast, a leading expert in high-utilizer care discusses her MVP Method, used successfully in a recent Vizient performance improvement collaborative. The general principles and actions of the MVP Method can revolutionize care, break the cycle of utilization and change the life of your patients.   Guest speaker: Amy Boutwell, MD, MPP President Collaborative Healthcare Strategies   Moderator: Heather Forst-Ramirez, MS Performance Improvement Program Director Vizient   Show Notes: [00:35] Looking at the high utilizers [01:17] Conventional approach: nothing can be done [01:34] High utilizers account for 50 percent of readmissions [02:12] Defining patients who are high utilizers [02:56] How the Vizient PI Collaborative tackled the challenge [03:29] Details and strategies in the MVP Method [06:12] Addressing the challenges and the drivers of utilization [07:52] One patient’s story: a life transformed   Resources: High Utilizer (MVP) Collaborative Guidebook (Vizient, Jan 2021) Click here Lessons Learned from the High Utilizer Collaborative: Case Study (Vizient) Click here When Being an MVP is Not a Good Thing (Health Care Quality Innovation Network, Sep 2020) Click here Readmissions News: MVP Method Click here Designing and Delivering Whole-Person Transitional Care Click here   Subscribe Today! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Android Stitcher RSS Feed
Mar 1 2021
11 mins