Speak LOUD

Tiffany Barnes

Born and raised in Salt Lake City, Tiffany has made it her mission create real change, one person at a time; this was the premise for her podcast, ‘Speak Loud’. The objective of ‘Speak Loud’ was to create a platform that supports anyone that is currently suffering abuse in their life. The podcast consists of stories told by previous victims of abuse, that will showcase their triumph and provide hope and encouragement through the stories shared.The host, Tiffany, has experienced a lot during her life. With experiences like being emancipated at age 15 – the second case in the state of Utah for a child of age 15 to become legally emancipated from their parents, due to abuse – to working 3 jobs to support herself and her education, and being torch bearer of the 2020 Olympics, among many more achievements, Tiffany recounts her stories and experiences to help victims of abuse.Tiffany also founded S.H.A.R.E; an advocacy group for students by students who have experienced abuse. Tiffany and the S.H.A.R.E team were able to grow the advocacy group into a 501c3 non-profit – a huge accomplishment.‘Speak Loud’ has already grown rapidly and created a close-knit community. Being so early in its creation, the accomplishments already achieved by ‘Speak Loud’ shows a positive future for the podcast.Tiffany is also in the process of releasing her first book and autobiography, ‘The Throw Away Girl’, which is expected to release soon.Her motto is “It’s the START that STOPS you” – a line that sums up ‘Speak Loud’ and Tiffany’s mission to help victims of abuse.

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Beyond Survival with SARA IM
2d ago
Beyond Survival with SARA IM
Today I’m talking with Sara Im, who, after surviving a mass genocide in Cambodia that claimed 2 million lives, is a speaker and author of “How I Survived the Killing Fields.” She is a member of the Women’s Speaker Association and speaks to inspire listeners to thrive from pain to purpose, from corporate events to churches to schools. Today, she’s here to speak loud about never giving up on anything in life. Sara was born and raised in Cambodia, and was attending college at 21 when a military takeover in her country forced her out of the city and into the countryside to work in a labor camp. She experienced extreme exhaustion, sickness, and punishment for 4 years while forced to work in the rice fields. Often malnourished, Sara turned to prayer in her darkest moments, and clung to hope of seeing her family again. After four years, Sara recalls hearing noise in the distance that could have been gunfire or explosions. Though they didn’t know what was happening, the laborers—once 1000, and now around 300 people—were moved out of the camp and towards the jungle. Sara knew she had to do something drastic, so she took the chance and escaped with 3 friends. They ran into the jungle and walked for weeks back to Sara’s hometown, where she was eventually reunited with her family after seeing the devastation that had come to her home. After Cambodia was liberated, Sara recuperated for a year at home. She had no college to go back to, as most professors and educated people had been killed. After that year, her mother told her that she would have a better future in another country, and encouraged her to escape once more. Sara crossed the border from Cambodia to Thailand and found a refugee camp run by the UN. After registering, she searched for her single relative in the U.S. who would be able to help her get into the country—bringing her to Connecticut. Her relative was transferred before Sara ever arrived, but she was grateful for the church people who helped her settle, find a place to live, and learn English during the difficult transition. Soon, she was on her own two feet and able to bring her family to the U.S., as well. Sara was encouraged by many people to write a book after hearing her story. Once, during speaking, one woman in her group came to her crying, sharing with Sara that she had lost her teenaged son to suicide. Sara was shocked, having naively thought that all people in the U.S. would be happier, and thought that if she could write her story, she could help change people’s minds about taking their lives. After publishing her book, Sara received many testimonials about how reading it changed people’s lives. “It’s all worth it,” she says, reflecting on the change her book has done for people. “Struggling four years in the rice field, now I can save somebody’s life.” Beyond writing, she still continues as a professional speaker. Sara hopes listeners know to always H.O.P.E.: Have Only Positive Expectations. Things always change. Listen in to learn more about  Sara’s experience with writing and publishing, her religious awakening, and what her plans for the next 5 years are.Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webConnect with Sara on her websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Beyond Survival with SARA IM
2d ago
Beyond Survival with SARA IM
Today I’m talking with Sara Im, who, after surviving a mass genocide in Cambodia that claimed 2 million lives, is a speaker and author of “How I Survived the Killing Fields.” She is a member of the Women’s Speaker Association and speaks to inspire listeners to thrive from pain to purpose, from corporate events to churches to schools. Today, she’s here to speak loud about never giving up on anything in life. Sara was born and raised in Cambodia, and was attending college at 21 when a military takeover in her country forced her out of the city and into the countryside to work in a labor camp. She experienced extreme exhaustion, sickness, and punishment for 4 years while forced to work in the rice fields. Often malnourished, Sara turned to prayer in her darkest moments, and clung to hope of seeing her family again. After four years, Sara recalls hearing noise in the distance that could have been gunfire or explosions. Though they didn’t know what was happening, the laborers—once 1000, and now around 300 people—were moved out of the camp and towards the jungle. Sara knew she had to do something drastic, so she took the chance and escaped with 3 friends. They ran into the jungle and walked for weeks back to Sara’s hometown, where she was eventually reunited with her family after seeing the devastation that had come to her home. After Cambodia was liberated, Sara recuperated for a year at home. She had no college to go back to, as most professors and educated people had been killed. After that year, her mother told her that she would have a better future in another country, and encouraged her to escape once more. Sara crossed the border from Cambodia to Thailand and found a refugee camp run by the UN. After registering, she searched for her single relative in the U.S. who would be able to help her get into the country—bringing her to Connecticut. Her relative was transferred before Sara ever arrived, but she was grateful for the church people who helped her settle, find a place to live, and learn English during the difficult transition. Soon, she was on her own two feet and able to bring her family to the U.S., as well. Sara was encouraged by many people to write a book after hearing her story. Once, during speaking, one woman in her group came to her crying, sharing with Sara that she had lost her teenaged son to suicide. Sara was shocked, having naively thought that all people in the U.S. would be happier, and thought that if she could write her story, she could help change people’s minds about taking their lives. After publishing her book, Sara received many testimonials about how reading it changed people’s lives. “It’s all worth it,” she says, reflecting on the change her book has done for people. “Struggling four years in the rice field, now I can save somebody’s life.” Beyond writing, she still continues as a professional speaker. Sara hopes listeners know to always H.O.P.E.: Have Only Positive Expectations. Things always change. Listen in to learn more about  Sara’s experience with writing and publishing, her religious awakening, and what her plans for the next 5 years are.Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webConnect with Sara on her websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
You Are More Powerful Than You Think with SEPH DIETLIN
Nov 18 2022
You Are More Powerful Than You Think with SEPH DIETLIN
Today I’m talking with Seph Dietlin, a psychic and hypnotherapist, who, after experiencing a spiritual awakening in 2002, has set out to help others create their own reality and experience unity. He is constantly downloading and sharing knowledge through his intuitive online course, content, his podcast “Talk to My Angels” and more. Today, Seph is here to speak loud about how to utilize your trauma to become a conscious creator of your own reality.Soul Contracts and AgreementsSeph explains that everybody has the ability to tune in to a higher consciousness and unlock their intuition. It is an amazing tool that can be unlocked easily, even after we are taught to shut it down as we grow up. Seph describes this process as remembering something we already knew, which will allow the skill to unravel and unfold on its own time. Seph also talks about soul contracts and agreements that we make before coming into this world. This could be spouses we’ll meet or children that we’ll bring into the world as well as hardships that we agree to go through in life before being born in order to meet our higher mission. This way of thinking gives power back to us, in Seph’s opinion, and in his work in hypnotherapy he utilizes this concept when working with patients who are exploring their own soul agreements. Creativity and Higher ConsciousnessSeph’s advice for people wanting to connect with a higher self is to recognize that we are often in that higher brainwave state. ‘The flow,’ ‘the zone,’ and many other words describe what Seph is referring to. Creativity is an amazing portal: cooking, painting, or creating in any way is a great access point for higher state awareness, and from there that higher conscious state can be leveraged for healing. Seph also instructs listeners to pay attention to their imagination. Imagination is a portal through which our higher consciousness speaks to us. This can include dreams, ideas we visualize, and manifestation. Clairvoyance is simply allowing yourself to interpret what comes into the mind.Learning On Earth SchoolEvents that happened—and are still happening—in 2020 have moved humanity towards an expanded, creative state, in Seph’s opinion. Collective experience and collective trauma pushes humanity towards greater understanding of ourselves and the universe. On ‘earth school,’ what we are all learning is how to create our own reality. These skills can be honed with practices such as paradigm shifting, numerology and synchronicity.Meditation is a great place to start for those who want to channel and tap into a higher state. Seph explains that to enter the state, rather than trying to force it, instead remember the state of flow that comes from doing something creative or even just stepping into that shower. We are always expanding from challenges and learning from them, and every hardship is an opportunity for growth. Listen in to learn more of Seph’s beginnings in hypnotherapy and intuition, the history of hypnotherapy, 3d and 5d living and astral traveling.
Believe It or Not with LION GOODMAN
Nov 11 2022
Believe It or Not with LION GOODMAN
Today I’m talking with Lion Goodman, who, after a near-death experience at 26, has spent 5 decades researching the nature of consciousness, spirituality, and healing. He has instructed more than 500 healers, therapists, and coaches around the world in trauma-informed therapeutic coaching. His teaching methods have been vetted by the International Coaching Federation and the Association for Coaching. Today he is speaking loud about the role of beliefs in our life and the infrastructure of the human mind. Brushing Close to DeathLion graduated with a degree in Consciousness Studies but ended up as a traveling salesman in order to make money. On one trip, he had stopped to help a man whose car had broken down in the middle of the Mojave Desert. After 3 days of gaining each other’s trust, the man attempted to kill Lion and shot him in the head. After many hours, Lion was able to talk to and understand the man, and they came to an agreement: the man would not kill him and Lion would not turn him in. He later went to the hospital alone, where he was told that he was very lucky to have survived—which he says was not luck, but his being blessed. He had been ready to accept death but now wanted to grow and teach from this experience. The Discovery of SelfWhen Lion went through his near-death experience, he recognized that he was not simply his physical body. There was a him that was not his body, and as he says, most people who have been in a near death experience are not afraid of death, knowing that there is something on the other side. When people ask the question of ‘Who am I?’ Lion explains how he went about answering that question for himself. As a kid he read and learned as much as possible, and approached his studies as an exploration of who he was. He attended over 100 spirituality workshops and training as an adult. Beliefs are the core of the mind, he says, and finding out who you are is a discovery of the core self beneath those layers of belief. Experience is the best way of informing yourself of who you are. Healing Past TraumasNegative experiences like a broken arm, Lion says. Physical wounds can heal and become stronger as they scar, but injuries of the mind are often not given the chance to heal as the brain forces them down and away. Healing from trauma or bad experiences is simply processing those events in a safe way. But the beliefs we develop from trauma are often what damages us the most, not the trauma itself. Lion explains that we can also carry trauma not just from our own pasts, but from generations before us and potentially even past lives. The environment of friends, family, and media can all be traumatizing. Humans are constantly trying to float above the pool of trauma of our culture, which can include things we’ve never experienced personally, such as slavey and native genocide. Lion says that we have to start with ourselves as an act of “clearing this on behalf of previous generations.”Listen in to learn more about Lion’s books and his multi-dimensionality practices, as well as his approach to rapid, deep-belief healing.
A Contagious Smile with VICTORIA CUORE
Nov 4 2022
A Contagious Smile with VICTORIA CUORE
Today I’m talking with Victoria Cuore, an advocate, speaker, best-selling author and CEO of A Contagious Smile. She is a survivor of domestic abuse and has undergone over 100 operations as a result of the struggles she overcame. Today, she’s here to speak loud about fighting for yourself and acknowledging that everyone can get lost in the journey of life. Recovering From Domestic ViolenceVictoria always knew that she wanted to be a wife and a mother, which was the card that her abuser played in order to drive her into a toxic situation. After pushing her to get married, the abuser began physically assaulting Victoria once she was pregnant. Even as the abuse escalated, he continued to deny and gaslight her, to the point that Victoria even doubted herself. Victoria underwent dozens of surgeries and operations and is still affected by a history of abuse. At one point while in the ICU, she was told that she had a 2% chance of making it through the night. Then her daughter was born early, and Victoria found the strength to fight for her child. She soon received a restraining order on her abuser and terminated all parental rights. Letting Go of Hatred After AbuseMuch of Victoria’s healing process has stemmed from her daughter. She describes her daughter as a ray of light who is an advocate for other special needs peers. Victoria was encouraged to become an advocate both for those with special needs and abuse survivors and stopping the cycle of abuse with herself and her daughter. Victoria still has ongoing surgeries that are a direct effect of her abuse. Some of the injuries were exacerbated by her refusing medical treatment in favor of treating her daughter’s needs first. Despite all of this, she says she has forgiven her abuser and prays for him to this day. Victoria explains that allowing an abuser to hold place in your heart through hatred continues to give them power over your life. Letting go of hatred and forgiving opens up the heart for more love. Spreading Light and Positivity“Every smile has a story,” Victoria says, “and we want to share yours.” This is the goal of her company, A Contagious Smile. She seeks to share light, inspiration, and positivity. A smile is always contagious no matter what it looks like. Who doesn’t want to smile? Victoria’s website shares resources for those with special needs and people suffering from domestic violence. She also uses her platforms to provide support groups, fundraises, life skill classes, and more. Victoria believes in a world that’s full of love, laughter, and life. She encourages listeners to not carry negativity and hate in their heart when they could be carrying love in that place, and she hopes that those tuning in know that they are worth fighting for. Listen in to learn more about Victoria’s resources for domestic violence survivors, podcasts for teens and adults, and her work breeding emotional support and service animals.
Building Confidence with DEBBY KRUSZEWSKI
Oct 28 2022
Building Confidence with DEBBY KRUSZEWSKI
Today I’m talking with Debby Kruszewski, a coach, consultant, and author of “Soul Meets Body: Six Degrees of You” and several other books. After being ‘dream crushed’ by corporate America, Debby decided to listen to her inner voice, leave the corporate world, and begin writing. Today she’s here to speak loud about self worth, respect, and integrity. Being Dream Crushed As a woman in an executive position in corporate America, Debby had dealt with more than her fair share of sexism in the workplace. One instance stands out to her, when a recruiter belittled and gaslit her about being a woman in her job position. At a certain point, Debby had to stop and reflect. Who she was was more important than a job. So, she left the corporate world, and began to write. Debby never thought about becoming a writer before, but when she left her job, she heard a voice telling her, “Leave, and I’ll take care of it.” She listened, and the storylines began pouring out. She fell in love with the characters who were mirroring her own life and experiences and wanted to share those moments and lessons with others. Choosing Self Respect“How many situations is it easier to take the hit for the greater good?” Debby asks. When faced with uncomfortable, disrespectful, or belittling behavior, oftentimes we think it’s better to suck it up and keep the peace. However, she explains that there is a difference between being a nice person—and being abused. Debby encourages listeners to leave the situations in which you’re treated this way and find something better, as she did. Finding the courage to stand up to people treating you wrongly is not an overnight process, Debby explains. Recognition, self-healing, and forgiveness are the ‘first draft’ — from there, it’s a long path, but incredibly worth it. Acknowledging the situations where, how, and why you were being treated wrongly allows you to unveil what’s holding you back. Forgiving yourself for the things you weren’t able to do at the time will release the weight you’re holding onto from those situations, and let you identify what you want, so that you can start building that path to your dreams. Rising Above Negativity Much of Debby’s teachings revolve around self-confidence and self-worth. One little step at a time, she believes that anyone can rise above and overcome the things that are putting them down. Even in a powerless phase, you have the autonomy to say goodbye to negativity and release the things you couldn’ control. Inner strength and confidence comes out of refusing to let negativity dictate your life. Debby hopes that listeners know that everyone deserves to live a wonderful life and that this conversation helps people know that they are all capable of getting out of situations that no longer serve them. Listen in to learn more about Debby’s inspirational blog, how her books offer a look at truth and tragedy, and her exclusive offer for Speak Loud Podcast listeners.
Silencing Harmful Grief Narratives with MANDY CAPEHART
Oct 21 2022
Silencing Harmful Grief Narratives with MANDY CAPEHART
Today I’m talking with Mandy Capehart, author, speaker, and certified grief and life coach. She’s the founder of the restorative grief project, an online resource for grievers looking for growth and healing. Today, she’s here to speak loud about grief literacy, and the language needed to navigate grief for ourselves and others. The Unalignment of GriefMandy recounts having lost someone to death almost every year of her life. While she was grieving almost constantly, she says that she wasn’t doing so in a good way. She coped with humor and by minimizing herself to service others. The first eye opener came in high school, when her senior class shared a loss of another classmate and Mandy began to realize that not all of the methods used to move through grief were effective. In 2016, Mandy’s mother died 4 months after being diagnosed with cancer. Mandy had just had a baby and had planned on her mother being with her to help take care of her grandchild. After taking the time needed to process, Mandy began exploring what she recognized as the unalignment of thoughts, emotions, body, and spirit when someone is grieving. Since then, she’s been speaking publicly and educating herself and others. Be Heard, Known, and LovedPart of Mandy’s goal is teaching people how to be heard—and how to listen to others. Bearing witness, as she explains it, is more than just holding space for someone. It’s experiencing the honest truth of what they’re going through without judgment or advice on how to ‘fix’ a situation. For someone going through grief, Mandy says it’s important to know yourself and your support group. Who would you call if you need an ear or a hug and who would you call if you need someone to organize your linen closet? It’s okay to be specific. The same goes for supporters. If there’s something that you can offer, let your friend know. Trauma survivors know how tough they are. Sometimes they need the space to be heard, known, and loved rather than having someone try to fix the situation. Grieving Outside of ChurchWhen Mandy’s mother died, Mandy had been leading a worship at church. After that loss, she didn’t know how to work through her feelings within the faith. Many people within the faith minimized her pain by supporting a religious agenda or their own beliefs. She stepped down as a worship leader, knowing she couldn’t lead herself, let alone others. Mandy’s book came from this time of reflection and exploration of what faith means in this new world. She realized that the church did not know how to support her and also noticed that it wasn’t able to support people through the pandemic. Her book offers a guide for people within the church realms to move past scriptures and lean into the practical element with daily prompts and quotes and practical resources to revisit whenever needed. Listen in to learn more about the Restorative Grief Project, the cyclical nature of grief, and how to start talking about grief in your life.
Living Vibrantly with DONNA TASHIJAN
Oct 14 2022
Living Vibrantly with DONNA TASHIJAN
Today I’m talking with Donna Tashijan, a life mastery coach and founder of the Vibrant Living International nonprofit. Donna specializes in turning baggage into luggage, accelerating transformations for people across the globe. She’s the author of 4 books and is known for having a “knack for turning fear into excitement” through speaking and coaching. Finding Support EarlyAt 14, Donna was assaulted and became pregnant, giving birth to her first child by 15. The judgment of teenage pregnancy caused feelings of shame, resentment, and anger. She developed a fear of failing as a mother before even starting her own life and had to learn to rise above. For someone who might be in a similar situation, Donna says that she wishes she had spoken to herself differently. Self-talk can be an important tool for healing. She also encourages people to look for support, and that there is more help available than you might think. Helping Women’s TransformationsThe focus of Donna’s nonprofit, Vibrant Living International, is “to help people to rise above the pain and disappointment that life can bring so that they can live the life of their dreams with confidence and ease.” Vibrant Living was established 10 years ago when Donna was considering what she could do that would both support her and Donna has been a life coach for more than 25 years, but has always been a supportive ally for friends in need. Her oldest daughter has told her that for as long as she could remember, “women have been on the couch crying and you were helping them.” Through Vibrant Living International, her podcast, and 4 books, Donna has shared that advice and care with thousands. Turning Baggage Into LuggageAs a life coach, Donna has developed the phrase, ‘turning baggage into luggage.’ ‘Baggage-thinking’ includes thoughts and feelings of low self-esteem, vengeance, resentment, negative self-talk, and so on. These are legitimate and valid feelings, Donna says, but luggage-thinking is what brings about change. ‘Luggage-thinking’ happens when someone begins to see their past or trauma not as their entire life story, but as a single chapter, page, or even paragraph. At 15, Donna felt like what had happened to her was the end of the world, but now she stresses the importance of looking for the gifts in the pain. How will this help me grow, now? It’s a gift wrapped in sandpaper, Donna says, not a pretty bow. Listen in to learn Donna’s 4 steps for transformation, what modalities she uses for healing, and her future plans for herself and her business. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webVisit the Vibrant Living International websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
From Betrayal to Breakthrough with DR. DEBI SILBER
Oct 7 2022
From Betrayal to Breakthrough with DR. DEBI SILBER
Today I’m talking with Dr. Debi Silber, founder of the Post-Betrayal Transformation Institute, holistic psychologist, and personal development expert. She’s a best-selling author and award-winning speaker, appearing on Fox, CBS, and TedEx, and is dedicated to helping people heal from past betrayals. Learning the Effects of Betrayal Dr. Silber has been in the business for 30 years, starting with a focus on health and personal development. After a series of betrayals, she decided to return to school for her Ph.D., knowing that something had to change. Her degree was in Transpersonal Psychology, in which she did a study on betrayal and what it does physically and emotionally.Dr. Silber has made and confirmed three discoveries: betrayal feels different than other traumas, such as disease and death; a collection of common symptoms make up what is now post-betrayal syndrome; and, by healing the betrayal entirely, you can come out the other side an entirely changed person. The Stages of BetrayalIn the Post-Betrayal Transformation Institute, Dr. Silber and her certified coaches help clients identify and move through the stages of betrayal. Most people get stuck in Stage 3, where survival instincts take over after the build-up and the trauma itself. Small self benefits of having sympathy or someone to blame are often what keep people in this stage. Stage 4 involves willingly moving on and finding a new normal. This, Dr. Silber explains, already begins to turn down the stress response and mitigate the damage done by Stage 3. Then, in Stage 5, the transformative rebirth happens as you’re finally able to see more clearly and feel grounded. The Transformation of Overcoming BetrayalDr. Silber wants listeners to know that betrayal trauma can be overcome. “Just because this has been your experience,” she says, “doesn’t mean it has to be your sentence.” Betrayal is just one chapter in someone’s entire life story. Dr. Silber describes how a completely new person emerges from Stage 5, after fully healing and embracing their new narrative. She’s seen new levels of health and relationships in the people who have passed through her institute. The beauty of betrayal, she believes, is in that transformation. Listen in to learn more about the effects of betrayal, the different healing processes after betrayal, and how to know if you have post-betrayal syndrome. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webLearn more on the PBT websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast and share this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
It's Ok To Be Different with SIVAN HONG
Sep 30 2022
It's Ok To Be Different with SIVAN HONG
Today I’m talking with Sivan Hong, author and illustrator of the “Super Fun Days Books” series. Her work focuses on inspiring neurodiverse children in overcoming challenges with perseverance and bravery. Sivan is here to speak loud about the power and benefits of neurodiversity and how cool it is to be different. Supporting Kids with NeurodivergenceSivan believes that books are incredibly powerful tools in helping someone feel that they’re not alone. The structure of her books was based on social stories that are often used in special education, taking the educational framework and bringing it home for families. Sivan’s first book was published three years ago, based on a true story she shared with her oldest son. Sivan doesn’t want her children to grow up with the challenges that her generation did when it came to neurodivergence. Rather than seeing their struggles as a failure of their ability, she wants kids now to know that “Different is OK,” and know that they have the support they need. Identifying Neurodivergence EarlySivan’s first two books featured her two sons, but her last two have had female characters. This was intentional, she explains, as girls are identified with ADHD much later in life than boys—in their middle age as opposed to a boy in second grade. Girls of color have the lowest level of diagnosis. Sivan hopes to help the underserved population of neurodivergent women by offering representation through her books. Rates of ADHD in adults have also been going up, Sivan explains, because of increased diagnoses in children. This was how she identified her own neurodivergence, seeking a diagnosis after seeing similarities between herself and her kids. Sivan believes the best way to help is to share the message with kids when they’re young so that they can bring confidence and self-understanding into their adult lives. Functioning With NeurodivergenceLife with neurodivergence is all about finding what works. Sivan shares that audiobooks opened up the world of literature for her after struggling with reading and spelling in school. As an adult, she’s developed her own unique structure that allows her to function day-to-day. Neurodivergence manifests itself in a spectrum and can look different from person to person. Sivan believes that a diagnosis alone can help with someone’s mental health: understanding and having a name for the way your brain works can give a sense of peace and clarity. She hopes that listeners know that there is power in being neurodiverse and that it is okay to be different. Listen in to hear the story behind Sivan’s first book, her upcoming projects, and where to seek out a medical diagnosis for neurodivergence. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webFind Sivan’s work on her websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast and share this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Your Issues Are In Your Tissues with ANISSA HUDAK
Sep 23 2022
Your Issues Are In Your Tissues with ANISSA HUDAK
Today I’m talking with Anissa Hudak, a registered yoga trainer who works with PTSD, trauma, and the military. She volunteers with soldiers to provide yoga and other therapies, she founded the Trauma Healing Yoga Therapy program, which uses science-based yoga and holistic techniques to treat PTSD and trauma. Discovering Yoga-Based TherapyAnissa found her current calling when she started taking yoga teacher training classes. At first, she wanted to have the skills for her own journey, but after the class ended found opportunities opened up for her. She loved that this new profession felt like sharing a gift rather than teaching. After taking classes geared towards PTSD survivors and veterans, Anissa saw that she had an opportunity to take these gifts back to her community. As the daughter of a Vietnam veteran and the wife of an active duty combatant, she feels a special connection to those in the military and their families. From there, her journey went from one of self-discovery to helping others recover. What Does PTSD Look Like? PTSD presents in many different ways, which can make diagnosing it difficult. Anxiety, depression, and troubles with sleep are more recognizable symptoms. But sensitivity to light and trouble hearing can also be signs of PTSD, Anissa explains, since PTSD is an inflammatory illness. Many factors make up PTSD before it happens, as well. The stress levels of a person before a traumatic incident, their childhood, and any pre-existing mental illnesses can determine why one person may return from an event traumatized while another doesn’t. Anissa explains that PTSD is the body saying, “I need a reset” in the central nervous system. PTSD starts in the body and manifests as a mental health issue. How Does Yoga Help PTSD? Anissa stays away from saying PTSD can be ‘cured,’ but does believe that it can be healed. Yoga allows practitioners to stay in the moment, which is helpful when facing PTSD triggers that try to take you back to the past. Anissa’s practice utilizes yoga to help reset the central nervous system. The more someone does it, the longer they’re able to stay in the upper echelon of their brain, rather than in the fight-or-flight response. Anissa specifically curates her practices for people with PTSD. Slowing down can be triggering for some people, which is why Anissa’s classes are interactive and engaging. The body is allowed to move slower while the brain remains occupied. By sharing her practice, Anissa hopes that more people can start to understand what PTSD is, where it lives in the body, and how it can be treated. Listen in for Anissa’s tips on meditation, the relationship between PTSD and memory, and how to find a yoga therapist for your own needs. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webFind Anissa’s practice on her websiteSpread the message of Speak Loud Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Life Coaching For Kids with RENAYE THORNBORROW
Sep 16 2022
Life Coaching For Kids with RENAYE THORNBORROW
Today I’m talking with Renaye Thornborrow, a child life coach whose worldwide movement helps bring life coach training to kids with a story-based curriculum. She has worked in the industry for more than 10 years, sharing her teachings with other coaches, educators, and counselors to help children soar in life. Repurposing Coaching for KidsChildren’s mental health has recently been declared a national emergency by 3 pediatrician institutions, making Renaye’s work even more crucial. She’s worked as a child life coach since 2013, having been interested in personal development since graduating college. She became interested in applying those skills to children when she had kids of her own. Life coaching is about giving support as a preventative measure. Renaye created her company and curriculum to help share skills with her own kids, and from there, the vision grew into helping others. She now has coaches in more than 30 countries, helping children develop skills such as confidence, positive self-talk, resiliency, and more. Developing a Kids’ Coaching CurriculumRenaye’s curriculum includes 27 different mindset skills that are taught through stories, games, and flexible coaching. When she had more and more people coming to her to learn more, she created her certification program to allow coaches, educators, and therapists to use her work in their practices. The stories are often 5-8 minutes and typically for children between 6 and 12. These stories are designed to show children these different skills and, with the coach’s support, apply it to their own lives. For kids in elementary and middle school facing serious challenges for the first time, these skills are vital. Teaching Kids ResilienceRenaye offers a book on positive self-talk on her website, where anyone can read and learn about the skill. Resiliency is another skill that the program focuses on, which is taught by learning to reframe the way we view experiences that happen to us. Renaye calls this, “Wearing your power goggles,” with kids. Even when something terrible happens, there’s a way to take something empowering from it. To Renaye, “empowerment is when your power comes from inside.” Our most powerful tool is our mind and our thoughts shape everything in our world. Empowerment is learning how to create the lives we want. One of Renaye’s goals with her program is to help kids feel empowered so that they’re confident about tackling any challenge that comes their way. Listen in to learn more about the tools Renaye’s program uses, how life coaching helps trauma, and some of her favorite stories of helping kids develop positive life skills. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webFind more on Renaye’s websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast and share this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Finding Acceptance with REBECCA HEIDT
Sep 9 2022
Finding Acceptance with REBECCA HEIDT
Today I’m talking with Rebecca Heidt, an artist, entrepreneur, and author of “Acceptance: The Beginning,” the first work of a trilogy that chronicles and teaches the journey of self-acceptance. She’s worked in management and finance but has always had a love for the arts. Rebecca is here to speak loud about how to remain your authentic self when surrounded by society’s boxes. Growing Up LGBTWhen Rebecca was growing up, she had no one to talk to about being LGBT. Her childhood was full of uncertainty and chaos as she explored her feelings. It wasn’t until college that she felt comfortable being open about her relationship with another woman, as she was still navigating homophobia and a lack of representation in her community. While her family had their struggles with accepting her, Rebecca is in a much better place now, happily out and married. She explains, “The only way to benefit me was to be who I was.” She knows that being LGBT is not a lifestyle or a choice, but a part of one’s identity that deserves as much respect and acceptance as anyone else. Spreading the Word of AcceptanceRebecca's book, “Acceptance: The Beginning” came from a place of deep loss. During the pandemic, she lost four loved ones, and amongst the heartache and turmoil came growth and art. She felt she was receiving a message telling her that she could get through this and that she could help others do it, too. In writing down her thoughts and feelings, a book was formed. Rebecca’s book—the first in a prospective trilogy—is a vehicle for sharing the messages she wants other people to hear. Things that she wanted to say to others or to herself but never had the chance to are communicated through the book’s characters. The first book, ‘Acceptance’, allows people to face the emotions they’ve shut down, while the second will help them face the trauma now that it’s been unlocked. Art As HealingThroughout her childhood, Rebecca was always drawn to art. When she lost her job as an adult during the pandemic, she rediscovered art as a hobby and a love. Art is healing, to Rebecca, and she loves that it’s able to bring others color and joy as well as herself. With her art, she hopes to extend that extra bit of help and light to people who need it. Her purpose is to share a message of peace and positivity, knowing that we will be okay if we do it together. Listen in to learn more about Rebecca’s books, her advice on self-acceptance and the journey, and what makes her feel empowered. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webConnect with Rebecca on her websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
A Higher Road with D. NEIL ELLIOTT
Sep 2 2022
A Higher Road with D. NEIL ELLIOTT
Today I’m talking with D. Neil Elliott, author of “A Higher Road: Cleanse Your Consciousness to Transcend the Ego and Ascend Spiritually.” Despite appearing outwardly successful, Neil had his own challenges behind the scenes that led him to discover a high road to transform his life. His entire life view changed and now he desires to help others empower, transform, and bring peace, love, and joy into their lives. Connecting Science and SpiritualityNeil read hundreds of books and attended countless self-help courses, never finding one that fulfilled his needs. As an engineer, spirituality and self-help books—while giving great processes—didn’t give him the key he needed to bridge the gap between science and spirituality. Through a spiritual undertaking, Neil discovered the process necessary to understand the truth and connect to source. “When you change your beliefs, you change what you see,” Neil says. His understanding is that everything we see in the world is a reflection of our beliefs and that the electrical and magnetic impulses that make up our thoughts and feelings create a blueprint for the experiences we call into life. Starting the Spiritual JourneyNeil’s book outlines the seven steps he took on his own spiritual journey: expand consciousness, unveil new truths, reflection, cleansing beliefs and thoughts, rebuilding consciousness, meditation, and repetition. The process explained in his book will take about a year and will radically transform your life, according to Neil. “Every thought you think creates a like event you manifest in your life,” Neil explains. Understanding this is one of the key tools for transforming your life. His understanding of how the universe came to be and its mechanics, the creation of experience in our life, and the science-based understanding of it are all things that Neil learned.Practicing Enlightenment Daily When striving for enlightenment, Neil first recommends meditation. He meditates first thing in the morning as part of his daily ritual when his brain isn’t so busy with the external world. External factors often drive our thoughts and actions in life, but through meditation, you can learn to live ‘from the inside out’—allowing your inside voice to drive what you say and do. Neil spent years listening to audiobooks in order to train his brain to take in auditory information, which he says has allowed him to focus while meditating. Along with these practices, he recommends cutting out anything that doesn’t align with the message of unconditional love, and not let fear motivate your journey to enlightenment. “No matter where you are, you can change your life,” he promises.Listen in to learn more about the role of Ego in enlightenment, Neil’s golden aspirations, and the Great Awakening happening in our world today. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webConnect with Neil on his websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast and share this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Turning Your Trauma into "SASSI" with CHRISTINE MALEK
Aug 26 2022
Turning Your Trauma into "SASSI" with CHRISTINE MALEK
Today I’m talking with Christine Malek, the founder and creator of “The SASSI Coach” program for women in or recovering from abusive situations. She is an advocate for women against domestic violence and uses a unique coaching approach to bring out the strength and light in every woman she works with. Her life mission is to help others “ruffle some feathers and blow some minds” as they identify and reach their goals. Shining a Spotlight on AbuseChristine experienced every abuse in the book. Her defining moment was in 2018 when her abuser shot her in the back of the head after an altercation. She remembers the night vividly and recalls her thoughts at the time the gun went off: “Fuck, I’m not dead,” and, “Oh, I’m not dead.” She was described as ‘lucky’ that her abuser must have tilted the gun to only graze her at the last moment, but Christine knows that this moment was her angels stepping in. This was what forced Christine to admit that something had to change. The abuser wasn’t worth her life or freedom. Her guides had set her down a new path, one that meant shining a spotlight on the subject of abuse and those suffering in silence. She had to put her foot down—first for herself and then for others. Following Your Own PathChristine emphasizes the importance of having a plan when escaping an abusive situation. “I don’t care how lame the plan is,” she says. It’s more important to have one. 1 in 7 women never escape their abuse. The small steps—setting dollars or even coins aside, stashing go-bags with important items and records—are crucial in leaving an abusive situation. Ironically, Christine’s journey as a coach was unplanned. But it was soon clear to her that this was her path in life. As a business consultant, she had clients tell her that she should be a coach. Eventually, she signed up for a virtual program, planning to use it for her consulting business, but during one session, the lightbulb went off. “Oh,” she thought, “this is what I’m supposed to be doing.” Now, it’s Christine’s goal to help everyone she can and end domestic violence. Finding the SASSI Sisterhood“SASSI” stands for “Strong, Assertive, Sexy, Smart, Independent.” Christine chose this to represent women as more than just “strong and independent,” as the phrase often goes. Through her programs and podcasts, she’s helped an innumerable amount of women by spreading the love and the word.Part of that mission is attacking the stigma of women who are abused and the judgments they face when coming out with the truth. The key is communication: you have to tell someone. If not a family member or close friend, Christine recommends a church—any church—a police station, a school counselor, or a hotline. Just as those suffering abuse need to talk—those who they confide in need to listen. Listen in to learn more about the SASSI Program’s ‘Seven Steps to SASSI,’ Christine’s eye-opening experience with her guides, and her future plans as an abuse advocate. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webReach out to Christine on The Sassi CoachSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Trauma Informed Care through Ayahuasca with MICHAEL THORNHILL
Aug 12 2022
Trauma Informed Care through Ayahuasca with MICHAEL THORNHILL
Today I’m talking with Michael Thornhill, co-founder of Casa Galactica, an ayahuasca healing and evolutionary retreat based in Peru. He’s a traditionally-trained plant spirit healer and professional advocate for trauma-informed care. With Casa Galactica, Michael and his wife blend Eastern medicines with Western mindsets to transform years of suffering into an empowered state of mind. Michael’s journey with plant medicine began with his journey in healing from addiction, trauma, and abuse. His struggle with substances began young and continued into his late 20s when he started to explore meditation and sound healing. From there, he was drawn to ayahuasca. For Michael, ayahuasca was able to address the root cause of his addiction, alerting him to the fact that the life he lived was out of line with his deeper self. Following the medicine to Peru, Michael learned with indigenous teachers and found a deeper calling in guiding others to the same freedom and liberation he experienced. “There’s more to your life than just healing trauma,” Michael says. “It’s waiting for you.” Ayahuasca refers to the ayahuasca vine and the leaves of the chacruna plant. The plant has a high concentration of DMT, while the vine acts as an MAO inhibitor. allowing for a deeper journey with the medicine. Journeys can last from 3-6 hours, in which the “veil of illusion dissolves,” allowing you to dive deeper, reframe repressed trauma, and heal past events. Ayahuasca ceremonies are part of the national heritage of Peru, stemming from a long history of plant medicine wisdom. Ayahuasca is not only legal in Peru, but encouraged and protected as a form of healing. Other indigenous cultures throughout the world have lost their practices with plant medicine. Michael explains that ayahuasca is not a ‘drug,’ but a plant medicine, as it is something that helps you heal. Drugs are to escape. Plant medicines let you look closer,  Casa Galactica advocates for trauma-informed plant medicine journeys, sharing shamanic wisdom in a context that’s empowering and accessible for Western mindsets. Michael and his wife’s 10-day retreats consist of 4 ceremonies, which they found was enough time to get the most out of the plant’s healing. 10 days at Casa Galactica can catalyze life for the next 10 years, in Michael’s opinion. Sitting with ayahuasca can be a difficult experience, especially when repressed trauma is surfacing. That’s why Michael and his wife focus on holding a safe space and being with their clients every step of the way. They pride themselves on transparency and intention, providing as much information and preparation as they can leading up to and throughout the retreat. Despite the difficulty, Michael says that sitting with the medicine “has always been worth it.” Even after ‘bad’ ceremonies, he himself came out feeling like a different person. Michael hopes listeners learn that there are different options for healing and that while plant medicines are less known or understood in the western world, they are an option. “It’s all going to be okay,” he says as something he knows for certain. Listen in to learn more about the medical and diet guidelines for ayahuasca journeys, the cost of Casa Galactica’s 10-day retreats, and how to book a free 30-minute consultation with Michael and his wife. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webLearn more about Casa Galactica Spread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode
Its Ok To Be A Work in Progress with Host TIFFANY BARNES
Jul 29 2022
Its Ok To Be A Work in Progress with Host TIFFANY BARNES
Today I’m taking the time for a solo episode to talk about a few topics that have come to mind as I approach 40-years-old. A few conversations with friends and online interactions have brought inspiration for this episode of talking about how childhood trauma follows a person all the way into their adulthood behaviors. Reflecting and Reminiscing As I approach my birthday, I’ve been reminiscing and reflecting on the last and the next 40 years. I recently made a post on Facebook on the signs of high-functioning anxiety. On the outside, a person may appear as hard-working, organized, and someone who can work well under pressure—but beneath the surface, they may be overwhelmed, burnt out, and set unrealistic expectations. All of this resonated with me greatly. To a stranger, my need to be busy might make me look like a hard worker rather than someone who doesn’t like to sit alone with their thoughts. The age-old adage, “You never know what someone else is going through,” still rings through, especially through the lens of social media. Acknowledging Trauma-Based BehaviorsI recently did a poll asking, “What are some things you don’t realize you’re doing because of childhood trauma?” I found myself resonating with many of the answers and thought it would be helpful to share some of the responses. Childhood trauma can manifest in strange ways, such as attention-seeking behavior or a fight-or-flight mindset. I, for one, find myself wanting to be recognized and heard. I often catch myself being too much of a people-pleaser or striving for perfection in order to be acknowledged. These were things I learned because of trauma, but there are ways to turn these behaviors into strengths. For example, since I work in hospitality, that people-pleasing thoughtfulness actually has positive impacts on my career. Recognizing trauma-related behaviors is the first step to healing the inner child. Learning to Be VulnerableHaving done this soul-searching leading up to my birthday, I think it’s important to say that it is okay to be vulnerable and share your struggles with others. You’re not alone in your suffering, and everyone—myself included—needs to know that it’s okay to have things that still need to be healed. Being a bit more honest with your struggles can, I think, lead to better conversation surrounding childhood trauma across the board. Listen in to hear more on dealing with the repercussions of trauma as an adult and other ways childhood trauma manifests as unconscious behaviors. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webSpread the message of Speak Loud Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Finding A Friend in the Mirror with NATHAN OSMOND
Jul 8 2022
Finding A Friend in the Mirror with NATHAN OSMOND
Today I’m talking with Nathan Osmond, keynote speaker, actor, entertainer as well as humanitarian. He’s had 4 consecutive hit country singles, won the John C. Maxwell Leadership Award 2 years in a row, and been the recipient of Honorary Command Sergeant Major. He uses his music and platform to recognize non-profits and to make a difference. Nathan is here to speak loud about being your own friend in the mirror through self-talk and resilience. Nathan has had his struggles with self-talk and self-image. Not long after returning from his mission abroad, he was cast in the leading role in ‘You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.’ He made extensive efforts to get into character but realized he may have internalized too much when he noticed self-esteem issues out of character. He had a heaviness that he couldn’t explain. Nathan knew he had to be still and figure out what was going on with him, so he went to the temple where his parents were married to think and pray. Sitting in his car, he swears he heard a voice ask, “Why don’t you love yourself the way that I love you?” as if someone was in the passenger seat. Nathan decided then that he would love himself, be his own friend in the mirror, and stop taking himself so seriously. When Nathan was a child, he was shy in the spotlight while the rest of his family was comfortable. After a nerve-wracking talk show appearance, his father told him that people wanted to hear what he had to say. Sometimes, Nathan recounts, you have to believe in someone else’s belief in you. He later went on to do more and more talk shows and eventually become a motivational speaker and podcaster. During the pandemic, Nathan was affected by the change and uncertainty and started experiencing episodes of panic and worry. He even visited the hospital to see what was wrong. Eventually, he called his uncle, Donny Osmond, to tell him what was happening, who just laughed and said, “Welcome to the club.” Talking with his uncle, Nathan learned something: to stop seeing things as black-and-white and to live in the gray and let those feelings go. Own your moment. To Nathan, there’s nothing that says, “This is how life has to be.” He’s found that he helps himself by helping others and listening to his own advice. “You’re speaking because you know what you need to hear,” he says. He wants to leave his mark on this world, whether it’s through music, speaking, or just being a father and husband. Sometimes you just need to ‘take a bit,’ as actors say, and pause to breathe before stepping into the spotlight. Nathan knows that we’re all human with unique challenges, and hopes that listeners find value in what he’s shared, whether that’s loving themselves more, learning to laugh at themselves, or finding peace and joy in the journey. He encourages everyone to be their own friend in the mirror, and to ask, ‘What are you saying to yourself?’ and ‘Would you say it to someone else?’Listen in to hear Nathan’s thoughts on seeing messages from a higher power, finding identity in who we are rather than what we do, and books he’s discovered in his journey with self-image. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webFind Nathan on his websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
LEARNING TO ADAPT with JEFF SOELBERG
Jul 1 2022
LEARNING TO ADAPT with JEFF SOELBERG
Today I’m talking about Jeff Soelberg, an amputee peer visitor, activist, and founder of the Jeff Giving a Hand Foundation. After losing three of his fingers in an industrial accident, Jeff has become a prominent advocate for amputees and how amputation affects all aspects of a person’s life. “Life happens when you adapt,” according to Jeff, and he believes in the resilience of the human spirit. On July 6th, 2016, Jeff was in an industrial accident that resulted in the loss of three of his fingers, along with tendon and nerve damage up to his elbow on his dominant hand. He had been shining a pump shaft when his glove got caught and his hand was pulled in to the wrist. Despite his shock, Jeff was able to instruct his coworkers and the on-site nurse on what to do and was soon taken to the hospital for surgery. Jeff underwent a total of 9 surgeries, 7 of them in the first 9 months. He recalls looking at his hand while waiting several hours in the hospital, knowing that his fingers weren’t there but not registering where they were. He describes the shock response as a sort of tunnel vision, and after leaving the hospital he was forced to relearn everyday functions while also dealing with the physical, emotional, and financial toll of his accident. Fingers are medically labeled as cosmetic, not essential. Jeff’s responds that anyone with ten fingers can’t tell him what is or isn’t essential. It may only be a finger, but we do so much with our fingers from dawn to dusk. Part of his work has been advocating to insurance agencies in order to increase the availability of prosthetics for amputees, without clients paying thousands of dollars. Recently, Jeff had the opportunity to go to London and educate a group of doctors on the necessity of finger prosthetics. Despite the advancements in prosthetic technology, the majority of hand surgeons are completely unaware of what prosthetics are available for the people they treat, and therefore won’t even think to prescribe a prosthetic. Jeff asked the group, “Where would you be without your fingers?” Education is a simple but incredibly important part of advocacy for amputees. The Jeff Giving a Hand Foundation has an emphasis on physical fitness and living life as an amputee. If life has handed you a challenge, it’s an opportunity to step back and figure things out. For those struggling mentally, Jeff advises the basics: just try. Go for a short walk, do something to elevate your heart rate, as sitting at home will only take you to dark places. Looking to the future, Jeff plans to continue doing everything he can to make prosthetics available to everyone who needs them. When Jeff first lost his fingers, he was unable to look at his hand when the doctor removed the bandage. Months later, he showed the same doctor a video of his most recent deadlift, and the doctor replied, “I always knew you had it in you.” Jeff hopes listeners know that a dark situation can be turned into something better, and encourages them to meet everyone with empathy and acceptance, whether their impairments are physical or invisible.Listen in to learn more about para-athletes and competitions, types of finger prosthetics, and how Jeff adapted and adjusted to life after his amputation. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webReach out on Jeff’s websiteSpread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer
Resilience with MARY JEAN WINN
Jun 17 2022
Resilience with MARY JEAN WINN
Today I’m talking with Mary Jean Winn. Mary Jean grew up in northern Utah and has spent a lifetime she describes as not recognizing her own self-worth. She has 6 kids and 12 grandkids. Mary Jean is a business owner and a writer, and is starting a non-profit to help others find their own empowerment and identity.Being Silenced on Abuse Mary Jean shares that she’s repressed the early parts of her childhood as a result of her abuse and has struggled to piece together how that early programming has affected the person she is today. She had a father who was physically abusive to her, her siblings, and her mother, and one of her earliest memories is of abuse witnessed at 9 years old. Throughout her childhood, Mary Jean didn’t go to therapy and didn’t speak about what was happening to her. People didn’t talk about abuse. Physical discipline was more common, but the line between discipline and abuse was often in question. Everything was silent, according to Mary Jean, and no one ever came to help. In her opinion, the worst thing that someone can do while abuse is happening is to be silent. Speaking Her Truth As an adult, Mary Jean has found comfort in writing about her experiences. She has filing cabinets full of journals that she uses as a healing modality. Being in survival mode for the majority of her life, she found there was a lot for her to process.Mary Jean’s book, “Lessons I Learned On a Dirt Road,” is a project 30 years in the making. The title was inspired by the clarity she feels while out in nature on a dirt road, where she feels the most grounded and closest to God. Although she struggled with the structure of the book, she hopes to begin the process of publishing in September. There is a need for her to tell her story. “You have your own roadmap,” she says and encourages listeners to make sure they’re not following someone else’s. Connecting People in NeedMary Jean’s nonprofit “Building Connextions” aims to create an empowerment center for at-risk people. She calls it a connection center where people can learn how to find their voice and live their truth in a safe, comfortable environment. The nonprofit is in its early stages, but Mary Jean is excited about the amount of potential it has. Mary Jeans wants to be a guide for people who are struggling, helping them find their best path in life. She’s in the process of putting together programs and growing the nonprofit into her dream, showing others how to live the life they’ve never lived before.  Mary Jean hopes listeners know to never give up, even in their darkest moments. If they keep putting one foot in front of the other, eventually everything will pass. This is a lesson she has taught to her kids and herself. Listen in to hear more of Mary Jean’s journey, why she decided to write her book, and what modalities she uses to stay on the right path in life. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webConnect with Mary Jean on her website Spread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website
Starting Over with STACEY DASH
Jun 10 2022
Starting Over with STACEY DASH
Today I’m talking with Stacey Dash, an accomplished actress, author, and healthy-living advocate. Stacey is a mother who has navigated many waters, overcoming obstacles to raise her children and remain in the film and TV industry. She recently celebrated 5 years clean and is here to speak loud about balancing family, health, and careers while holding onto your vision in life. Focusing on the Future Stacey believes that the future is more important than the past. “The windshield is bigger than the rearview mirror,” she says, but still details how her childhood affected her life. Both of her parents were addicted to drugs, and Stacy grew up angry as a result of her dysfunctional childhood. At age 8, Stacey knew she wanted to be an actress after acting in her first play. An actress was able to escape the life they were living, she realized, and be someone else. She landed her first job at 18 after leaving home, but still struggled with self-worth all the way into adulthood. It wasn’t until her son was born, after Stacey grappled with the decision of abortion, that she says her life began. Battling Opioid AddictionIn her adult life, Stacey struggled with an addiction to opioids, after being prescribed them for pain management. Everything that happened to her, she believed happened for a reason. At the time, opioids allowed Stacey’s brain to ‘slow down’ enough so that she could function. No one in Stacey’s life knew about her struggle with drugs, aside from her sister. She accomplished many things, including contributing to Fox News for 2 years, writing a book, and being a good mother. But after collapsing in pain because of organ shutdown, Stacey spent a month in the hospital and was told that she would die if she did any drugs again. After being released, she was suddenly on a plane to Utah to go to rehab. Addiction, as Stacey explains, is not a choice. It’s a disease, and a painful one, and getting clean is one of the hardest things to do. Never Too Late to Dream When it came to being a mother, Stacey considered what she had wanted as a little girl, and worked to give those things to her children. She had wanted to feel loved and safe and knew she had to give that life to her kids. “It ends with me,” she said, deciding that her future generations would not know abuse, instability, or loss.Stacey hopes that listeners come away from this episode with a greater sense of empathy and understanding. She is not a victim of her past or her circumstances. Even now, after being five years clean, she’s pursuing a passion project of interior design. Her goal is to create sanctuaries for people, both in-home and in worship, even if it means starting from the ground up. Stacey hopes that listeners know, “It’s never too soon and it’s never too late.” Whatever their vision is, it is still possible.Listen in to hear more about Stacey’s upcoming book, how her relationship with God empowers her through her struggles, and how she’s found patience and endurance in adversity.Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webFind Stacey on her website Spread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode with a friend!Please review our podcast disclaimer on our website