PODCAST

Rattlecast

Rattle Poetry

Rattle is a publication of the Rattle Foundation, an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to promote the practice of poetry, and is not affiliated with any other organization.

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ep. 144 - Mike White
5d ago
1 hr 57 mins
ep. 144 - Mike Whiteep. 143 - Chris Andersonep. 142 - Erin Murphyep. 141 - Janice N. Harrington
Apr 24 2022
2 hrs 1 min
ep. 140 - Kate Gale
Kate Gale is co-founder and managing editor of Red Hen Press, editor of the Los Angeles Review, and she teaches in the Low Residency MFA program at the University of Nebraska in Poetry, Fiction and Creative Non-Fiction and in the Ashland, Ohio MFA Program. She is author of seven books of poetry including The Goldilocks Zone from the University of New Mexico Press in 2014, and Echo Light from Red Mountain in 2014 and six librettos including Rio de Sangre, a libretto for an opera with composer Don Davis, which had its world premiere October 2010 at the Florentine Opera in Milwaukee. Her newest book, The Loneliest Girl, was just published by University of New Mexico Press. For more, check out her website at: https://kategale.com/ In the first hour, we're joined by special guest George Bilgere, returning to share a pair of poems from his new book, Central Air. http://www.georgebilgere.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: An aphorism is a concise statement that contains a bit of wisdom or wit about life, such as “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” or “Honesty is the best policy.” Write a poem that is either based on an aphorism or contains one or more aphorisms. Next Week's Prompt: Let’s write a poem about one (or each!) of the 12 Jungian archetypes. The first archetype is “the artist.” The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Apr 19 2022
2 hrs 29 mins
ep. 139 - Todd Davis
Please take this quick poll to help us decide the best time to air our live Rattlecasts! https://www.rattle.com/poll/ Todd Davis is the author of seven full-length collections of poetry: Coffin Honey, Native Species, Winterkill, In the Kingdom of the Ditch, The Least of These, Some Heaven, and Ripe—as well as of a limited edition chapbook, Household of Water, Moon, and Snow. He edited the nonfiction collection, Fast Break to Line Break: Poets on the Art of Basketball, and co-edited Making Poems: Forty Poems with Commentary by the Poets. His poetry has appeared in Ted Kooser's syndicated newspaper column American Life in Poetry and his poems have won the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Prize, the Chautauqua Editor's Prize, the Midwest Book Award, the ForeWord INDIES Book of the Year Bronze and Silver Awards, and the Bloomsburg University Book Prize. He teaches creative writing, American literature, and environmental studies at Pennsylvania State University’s Altoona College. For more, check out his website at: http://www.todddavispoet.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A woman walks down a dirt road late at night. Next Week’s Prompt: An aphorism is a concise statement that contains a bit of wisdom or wit about life, such as “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” or “Honesty is the best policy.” Write a poem that is either based on an aphorism or contains one or more aphorisms. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Apr 10 2022
2 hrs 7 mins
ep. 138 - Elizabeth Johnston Ambroseep. 137 - Kim Stafford
Kim Stafford is a writer and teacher in Oregon, and founding director of the Northwest Writing Institute at Lewis & Clark College. His poetry titles include A Gypsy’s History of the World (Copper Canyon Press) and Wild Honey, Tough Salt (Red Hen Press). He has published a biography, Early Morning: Remembering My Father, William Stafford (Graywolf Press), We Got Here Together (a children’s book from Harcourt-Brace), and a book about writing and teaching: The Muses Among Us: Eloquent Listening and Other Pleasures of the Writer’s Craft (University of Georgia Press). His books have received Pacific Northwest Booksellers awards, and a Citation for Excellence from the Western States Book Awards. He co-founded the annual Fishtrap Writers Gathering in Oregon and teaches regularly at the Richard Hugo House in Seattle. Kim's most recent book is Singer Come from Afar (Red Hen Press). For more, check out his website at: https://www.kimstaffordpoet.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about something you were wrong about. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem about food or drink. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Mar 27 2022
2 hrs 11 mins
ep. 136 - Susan Vespoliep. 135 - Kevin Clark
Kevin Clark’s Self-Portrait with Expletives won the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Series Book Competition. His first full-length collection, In the Evening of No Warning, earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets. In spring 2020, Kevin was selected for a two-year appointment as poet laureate of San Luis Obispo County, California. Recipient of two teaching awards, Clark has written a textbook on writing poetry, The Mind’s Eye: A Guide to Writing Poetry. Clark lives with his wife, Amy Hewes, on California’s central coast, where he continues to play hardball and city league softball. Stephen F. Austin University Press just published Kevin Clark’s third full-length collection, The Consecrations. Find more at: https://kevinclarkpoetry.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about one of the seven wonders of the world: Great Pyramid of Giza, Colossus of Rhodes, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Lighthouse of Alexandria, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Temple of Artemis. (This is the classic list; feel free to use an updated list that includes different wonders.) Next Week’s Prompt: Write a haibun. The haiku’s season is spring. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Mar 13 2022
2 hrs 6 mins
ep. 134 - Kashiana Singh
Kashiana Singh is a management professional by job classification and a work practitioner by personal preference. Kashiana’s TEDx talk was dedicated to Work as Worship. Her poetry collection, Shelling Peanuts and Stringing Words presents her voice as a participant and an observer. Kashiana’s latest full-length collection, Woman by the Door, is a knitted collage of poems rooted in lived experiences and saturated with the poet’s varied sensibilities and influences. Her poems have been published on various platforms including Poets Reading the News, Visual Verse, Oddball Magazine, Rattle #73, and elsewhere. Kashiana lives in Chicago and carries her various geographical homes within her poetry. Find Kashiana's books and more at: https://kashiana.wordpress.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a descort poem. A descort is defined by its lack of predictability; no line in the poem should resemble any other line in terms of length and meter, and no lines should rhyme. In other words, each line should be unique. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem about one of the seven wonders of the world: Great Pyramid of Giza, Colossus of Rhodes, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Lighthouse of Alexandria, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Temple of Artemis. (This is the classic list; feel free to use an updated list that includes different wonders.) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts. 0:00 Welcome 1:10 Tatiana Dolgushina, “When War Makes a Child” 11:10 Featured Guest: Kashiana Singh 1:12:02 Kim Stafford, "Five Poems for Ukraine" 1:24:38 Open Lines 1 1:34:45 Brian Beatty, "Winter Can Go Away" 1:37:35 Open Lines 2 1:55:35 Tim's & Megan's Prompt Poems 1:59:43 Open Lines 3 2:25:10 Sciku, Next Week's Prompt & Guest
Mar 6 2022
2 hrs 12 mins
ep. 133 - Roberta Beary
Roberta Beary identifies as gender-expansive, and writes to connect with the disenfranchised, to let them know they are not alone. Her work appears in Rattle, 100 Word Story, Cultural Weekly, and The New York Times. Her short poem collection, The Unworn Necklace, received a finalist award from Poetry Society of America. Her prose poem collection, Deflection, was named a National Poetry Month Best Pick by Washington Independent Review of Books. Her next haiku collection, Carousel, won the Snapshot Press manuscript book award and should be out by the end of 2022. She lives in County Mayo, Ireland with her husband Frank Stella. Find Roberta's books and more at: https://robertabeary.com/ Find Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach's Worlds Together Worlds Apart readings here: https://www.facebook.com/WTWA2020/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: It’s the year 2222. What kind of world do we live in? Write a poem about it. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a descort poem. A descort is defined by its lack of predictability; no line in the poem should resemble any other line in terms of length and meter, and no lines should rhyme. In other words, each line should be unique. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Feb 28 2022
2 hrs 9 mins
ep. 132 - Marjorie Saiserep. 131 - Zilka Joseph
Feb 13 2022
2 hrs 21 mins
ep. 130 - William Loganep. 129 - Lester Graves Lennonep. 128 - Bill Glose
Bill Glose is an award-winning writer whose honors include the F. Scott Fitzgerald Short Story Award, the Dateline Award for Excellence in Journalism, and the Heroes' Voices Award for Veteran's Poetry. Bill is the author of five books of poetry—Postscript to War (Main Street Rag Press, 2020), Virginia Walkabout (San Francisco Bay Press, 2018), Personal Geography (David Robert Books, 2016), Half a Man (FutureCycle Press, 2013), and The Human Touch (San Francisco Bay Press, 2007)—and two chapbooks, Child of the Movies (Finishing Line Press, 2019) and Memory of Spring (Orchard Street Press, 2021). He was also the editor of the story anthology, Ten Twisted Tales (San Francisco Bay Press, 2008). From 2003 to 2020, Bill was a contributing editor with Virginia Living and a regular contributor to other magazines. He still writes freelance articles, appears frequently as a featured speaker on literary craft, and serves as a judge in writing contests. Find more info and all the books here: http://www.billglose.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Make the title of your poem a question and the body of your poem the answer (or the other way around!). Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem with one word per line. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Jan 24 2022
2 hrs 20 mins
ep. 127 - Marcela Sulak
Marcela Sulak returns to share her work as a translator! Marcela has published four titles with Black Lawrence Press–three poetry collections, including City of Skypapers (2021), Decency (2015) and Immigrant (2010), as well as her lyric memoir, Mouth Full of Seeds (2020). She’s co-edited with Jacqueline Kolosov the 2015 Rose Metal Press title Family Resemblance. An Anthology and Exploration of 8 Hybrid Literary Genres. Sulak, who translates from the Hebrew, Czech, and French, is a 2019 NEA Translation Fellow, and her fourth book-length translation of poetry: Twenty Girls to Envy Me: Selected Poems of Orit Gidali, was nominated for the 2017 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation (University of Texas Press). Her essays have appeared in The Boston Review, The Iowa Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Asymptote, and Gulf Coast online, among others. She coordinates the poetry track of the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Bar-Ilan University, where she is an associate professor in American Literature. She also edits The Ilanot Review and hosts the TLV.1 Radio podcast, Israel in Translation. Find more info and all the books here: http://www.marcelasulak.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write an echo verse poem by repeating the end syllable of each line, either verbatim or as a rhyme or slant rhyme. Robert Lee Brewer offers excellent examples of this form on the Writer’s Digest website. Next Week's Prompt: Make the title of your poem a question and the body of your poem the answer (or the other way around!). The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.
Jan 16 2022
2 hrs 25 mins
ep. 126 - Grant Quackenbushep. 125 - Amanda Newell