Artemis Speaks

Jeri Rogers

By making the world a more beautiful place, Artemis Speaks interviews writers and artists from the Appalachian Region of the Blue Ridge Mountains and beyond. This is a time we need to write and make art for the sake of healing our souls and enriching our communities. This podcast is a production of the Artemis Journal, a charitable organization now 43 years old and has evolved to be an all inclusive yearly journal with essays, poetry and art. read less
ArtsArts

Episodes

Javon Jackson, Jazz Saxophonist collaborating with acclaimed Poet, Nikki Giovanni
Nov 7 2023
Javon Jackson, Jazz Saxophonist collaborating with acclaimed Poet, Nikki Giovanni
The Moss Center in Blacksburg, Virginia presented a live performance and historic collaboration between renowned poet and Virginia Tech legend Nikki Giovanni and saxophonist-composer and former Jazz Messenger Javon Jackson. Their collaboration for over a year has yielded the CD The Gospel According to Nikki Giovanni. For an intimate jazz performance, Jackson brought his bold-toned, Trane-inspired tenor lines to bear on a series of hymns, spirituals, and gospel numbers hand-picked by Giovanni. The live performance also included jazz singer, Nnenna Freelon. This collaboration with Nikki Giovanni produced Jackson's fifth album for his Solid Jackson Records label. With a remarkable career as a Jazz saxophonist, Jackson released a potent tribute to a towering influence, Celebrating John Coltrane. His inaugural release on Solid Jackson Records featured the venerable drummer and former Coltrane collaborator Jimmy Cobb. He followed later in 2012 with Lucky 13, which featured the great soul-jazz keyboardist Les McCann and included a mellow instrumental rendition of Stevie Wonder's "Don't You Worry' Bout a Thing" along with a version of McCann's 1969 hit, "Compared to What." That same remarkably productive year, Jackson received the prestigious Benny Golson Award from Howard University in Washington, D.C., for recognition of excellence in jazz. Jackson's debut on the Smoke Sessions label, 2014's Expression, was a live quartet recording from the Smoke Jazz & Supper Club in Upper Manhattan. https://javonjackson.com/
Dr. Sandee McGlaun, Poet, Reading by Skip Brown
Sep 26 2023
Dr. Sandee McGlaun, Poet, Reading by Skip Brown
River Sequence (a Meditation)1. RiffleThis moment: like a fat round plum smooth as stone tumbled downstream, at the edge of stillness poised to roll. How long does it take a rock to travel the length of a river? How long does it take a mind to wind its way through a memory? Hold the present, juicy and heavy, in the palm of your hand. Loosen the fist of time and lean back, eyes closed, into turbulent water. Let the current lift your feet.2. RunA river begins at a clear, cold spring and flows one direction, riffles, runs, pools, and again. Time, too, moves forward in its eternal current, past-present-future. We try to contain it in rows of tidy boxes: line follows line, page follows page. A map draws a blue line we can trace with a finger on folded paper. When you stand in the river and look to its future, the current presses hard against the backs of your legs.3. PoolYet we live days that feel like minutes, minutes that enlarge, engulf years. The river too seeps sideways into the soil of its banks, spreads wide and flat and far when it floods. Water evaporates up into mist and fog, falls back down as rain, each drop rippling out, mosaic of many circles. Still we float along, certain we know where the current will take us. Still we say: the river flows to the sea.4. RiffleAt sea’s edge time passes more slowly than in higher climes, the scientists say, more slowly for feet than head. Are we drawn toes to tide because its pulse stretches our narrow days? Time: a wave rolling back on itself, a company of shimmering hourglasses that curl continuously toward the future until they end where they began. There is no time, the scientists say. Things happen. What if there is no time? Hard truth. Strange comfort.Sandee McGlaun
Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey
Feb 1 2023
Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey
When the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in 1989, four friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find. The final resting place of the Thoreau of the American West remains unknown and has become part of American folklore. In his book FINDING ABBY, Sean Prentiss goes on an odyssey looking for Abbey's grave and combines an account of his quest with a creative biography of Abbey.Sean Prentiss takes readers across the country as he gathers clues from his research, travel, and interviews with some of Abbey's closest friends. Along the way, Prentiss examines his sense of rootlessness as he unravels Abbey's complicated legacy, raising larger questions about the meaning of place and home. The result of this remarkable journey is the book, Which won the National Outdoor Book Award, the Utah Book Award for Nonfiction, and the New Mexico-Arizona Book Award. He is also a poet, published several times by Artemis Journal, Crosscut: Poems, a memoir-in-poems about his time as a trail builder in the Pacific Northwest. He also is a co-editor of two anthologies and textbooks about the creative process. Sean serves as Backcountry Magazine's poet laureate. Currently, he is an associate professor at Norwich University in Vermont.Before becoming a professor and writer, Sean worked as a trail builder in the Pacific Northwest and the Desert Southwest. Wherever he has lived, the power of stories and the power of place has been a part of his life.
Bill Glose, author
Sep 20 2022
Bill Glose, author
Many war books have been written the horrors of combat. All the Ruined Men explores how difficult and confusing it can be afterward to come back home. All the Ruined Men is a book of linked stories that show veterans struggling to adjust to civilian life after years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a combat veteran, and  a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, Bill served in the Gulf War as part of the first units deployed to prevent Saddam Hussein from invading Saudi Arabia. After months of tension, He was part of the ground invasion into Iraq, charging through sand dunes littered with dead bodies."I took after my father, a Vietnam vet who never spoke about his war. Stoicism was his fortress. It became mine too. Silence served as a tolerable stopgap for a while, but once I left the Army, I had too much free time to think. Reports about scores of veteran suicides had me worried. I hadn’t considered taking my own life, but some dark vortex had me in its grip. My choices were simple: I could follow the lessons of my silent father and let my internal anger and confusion grow until they exploded, or I could try something different. So I began to write about my experiences and those of other soldiers fighting in our seemingly never-ending wars. What I learned was that words had the power to heal. And that healing could be shared—with other veterans, with their families, with anyone curious about what it’s like to go to war and come home with serious emotional baggage." Bill Glose