PODCAST EPISODE

Non-sovereign state Sealand, Lippy's wedding dress shopping, misquoting film lines and massive vegetables

Lippy & Grumpy do podcasting

Nov 12 2021 • 38 mins


Find the current week's links at https://lippyandgrumpy.uk/ep53 Lippy tries to sneak a sweet in at the start of the podcast only to find it's the sourest of the sourest. Karma I say. Grumpy owns up to a misleading statement about the amount of plastic a washing machine filter captures and to a wrong fun fact. The Cranleigh Lions bonfire and fireworks was a roaring success and Grumpy reminisces about Beaujolais night in France many years ago. Lippy has her wedding dress buying session this week and very little to organise. There's a bit of to and fro over the band playing the first song, however all is well. Grumpy has found a micronation six miles off the Suffolk coast called Sealand, on a World War 2 gun emplacement, previously used as a pirate radio station. Not recognised as a sovereign state by anybody other than the 50 people who claim to live there, despite having a constitution, parliament, passport and stamps. Richard Osman's House of Games has a sister show At Night on BBC1. Grumpy has seen it and he's not impressed and will go back to loving the 6pm version. In an episode full of odd stories, we cover the decision to pickle Horatio Nelson in brandy so he could be transported back to England aboard the damaged Victory. Was it the right decision? Should rum have been used? Lippy has been attempting to be cool by sliding into DMs. Nothing to do with a certain brand of boot. Anyway, Lippy made a suggestion to Pot Noodle and not heard anything. I can feel a social media storm coming on. Grumpy has been looking at misquoted lines from films and amazingly he's found most of them are too pedantic for him. Who would have thought? A story about Davy Crockett wrestling a bear on a series called Timeless reminds him of Lippy's bear story. She's not impressed. A gentleman called Peter Glazebrook has an obsession with growing massive vegetables and holds a number of world records. Four foot leeks and 67 pound cabbages are nothing unusual.