PODCAST

Psych Mic

Maya Metser

Psych Mic is a podcast for psychology students to explore the endless ways they can use their psychology background to make an impact! In each episode, host Maya Metser, a former psychology student herself, interviews an industry leader about their career path and advice for students. Because psychology is so widely applicable, it can be a challenge to figure out what to do next. These episodes will give you language to talk about your passions, uncensored tips about graduate school and career development, and lots of confidence in your psych background!
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Psych Mic origin story
Jun 18 2021
25 mins
Struggle precedes mastery | Positive psychotherapy with Dr. Dan Tomasulo
Daniel Tomasulo, PhD, is an American counseling psychologist, writer, and professor and the Academic Director and core faculty at the Spirituality Mind Body Institute (SMBI), Teachers College, Columbia University.  He holds a Ph.D. in psychology, MFA in writing, and a Master of Applied Positive Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and was formerly the Director of the New York City Certification in Positive Psychology for the New York Open Center. He is also a Review Editor for Frontiers in Psychology special section Positive Psychology.  ​Sharecare honors Dr. Tomasulo as one of the top ten online influencers on the issue of depression, and was also recently honored by Teachers College, Columbia University with their 2021 Teaching Award. His clinical specialization is in psychodrama and sociometry, with an academic specialization in intellectual disabilities. Tomasulo developed Interactive Behavioral Therapy (IBT) and later Positive-Interactive Behavioral Therapy (P-IBT), forms of group psychotherapy for people with intellectual disabilities, and coauthored the American Psychological Association’s first book on the subject: Healing Trauma: The Power of Group Treatment for People with Intellectual Disabilities (2005) with Nancy Razza.  Dan's passion is Positive Psychology. While traditional psychology focuses on our weaknesses, positive psychology focuses on our strengths, cultivating our best selves so we can lead meaningful and fulfilling lives. See Dan's website here: www.dantomasulo.comSee Dan's books here: www.dantomasulo.com/booksSome of Maya's favorite quotes from Dan:"Most of my career has been about being disappointed with the establishment.""If you look at the statistics, 80% of people with depression relapse. If I'm going into business and I invent the pen that I've got to put on the market, and 80% of them break, I wouldn't be in business very long, you know? So, I think in the last 20 years, you've started to see a shift -- let's study the 20% that are doing well and figure out what they're doing. And that's what positive psychology is.""I want to do something that's bi-directional. I want to put out something good that something good happens out there. And that fills me back up and then I can put out more, you know, and if there's always a working through point, but if something isn't filling you up on a very regular basis, it's time for change.""Every stage of development is hallmarked by crisis and commitment. At first, the crisis happens, and then you become committed to a way of being. That crisis and commitment end up being the cornerstone of every developmental transition." Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
2d ago
1 hr 4 mins
Facilitating human connection | Counseling psychology with Dr. Laura Kasper
Laura B. Kasper, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and has been practicing psychotherapy for over 18 years. She has experience working with a diverse group of clients with respect to presenting concerns, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity.  Regardless of their background, the majority of her clients are highly intelligent and accomplished people who are interested in taking their personal and professional relationships to the next level. Her therapeutic approach blends her first-hand experience of the high-performing professional workplace with buddhist psychology and tools to offer support that is unrelentingly compassionate, direct, and powerful.In addition to her private practice, she is currently Adjunct Clinical Assistant Faculty at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also a small-group facilitator for Stanford Business School’s renowned emotional and relational intelligence course Interpersonal Dynamics.  She has been an Adjunct Faculty member at the University of California San Francisco, and The George Washington University. Prior to becoming a psychologist, she worked as a management consultant at Accenture in the health care industry. Laura received her Bachelor's from Penn State in Interpersonal Communication and her PhD in counseling psychology at the University of Maryland.We talked about... how one goes about figuring out if they’re suited for clinical work and what Laura did to figure it outhow she chose a counseling program over a clinical one, and a PhD over a PsyDhow she stood out as an applicant and what kinds of things you can do to stand out yourselfthe process by which you develop your individual style in graduate schoolhow to deal with insecurities around doing therapy in front of peers and faculty -- and do these insecurities go away?private practice - things Laura wishes she knew before starting one and important things to consider before you make that leaphow Laura developed this niche of working with founders and high achieversand so much more! Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Jan 20 2022
1 hr 28 mins
Healing communities from racial trauma | with Dr. Isha Metzger
Isha Metzger, PhD is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Founder and Director of The EMPOWER Lab, Owner of Cultural Concepts, LLC, a Certified Therapist in Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT), and she is the Mental Health expert for Salone Health, an organization dedicated to improving the health of Sierra Leoneans at home and abroad. The overarching goal of Dr. Metzger’s career is to take a strengths based, anti-deficit approach to prevention for youth of color. Dr. Metzger stands against anti-Black racism and oppression through "Engaging Minorities in Prevention, Outreach, Wellness, Education, & Research" through community-based participatory methods and advocacy. Dr. Metzger’s research is aimed at preventing engagement in risky behaviors (e.g., sexual activity, alcohol use, delinquency) as well as understanding risk and resilience factors (e.g., trauma experiences, racial socialization and racial discrimination, family and peer relationships) that impact the relation between trauma exposure and problematic outcomes (e.g., STI/HIV exposure, unintended pregnancies). Dr. Metzger is also engaged in translational research including the conceptualization, implementation, dissemination, and evaluation of prevention programming aimed at reducing mental health and health disparities among African American youth. Dr. Metzger earned her Bachelor’s in psychology from Georgia State University and her PhD in clinical-community psychology from the University of South Carolina.  Learn more about her projects at www.drishametzger.com.Black and EMPOWERED podcastIn this interview, we cover:When did you realize you wanted to devote your career to healing black babies?How did you figure out you wanted to do therapy and not medicine?Why was research a powerful way for you to address racial trauma?Dealing with vicarious trauma as a clinicianWhy did you choose to do your PhD in Clinical-Community PsychologyBecoming a competitive applicantNetworking before grad school: why it’s important and how to do itWhat do you wish you knew before grad school? Is it important to know exactly what you want to research before going to grad school?What is your research at the EMPOWER Lab? How do you involve the community?What is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went in life?Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Jan 13 2022
1 hr 22 mins
Letting out your inner child | Music & psychology with Dr. Susan Rogers
Susan Rogers, PhD, is a professor of Music Production and Engineering at Berklee College of Music. She holds a doctorate in psychology from McGill University, where she studied music cognition and psychoacoustics under researchers Daniel Levitin and Stephen McAdams. Her research focuses on auditory memory, the perception of musical signals, and the influence of musical training on auditory development. For two decades prior to her science career, Rogers was one of the world's few women known for her work as a record producer, engineer, mixer, and audio electronics technician. Career highlights include years (1983–1988) as staff engineer for recording artist Prince and working with such diverse artists as Barenaked Ladies, David Byrne, Tricky, and Tevin Campbell.Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyM5mbNEpWs&ab_channel=PsychMicIn this episode, we cover: Intro: who's the second interviewer with Maya??Susan’s childhoodHow do kids come to like what they like?Working with Prince: tech to engineerImportant skills for audio engineeringComparing art and scienceWhy Susan left music to study psychologyGrad school & mentorsSusan’s new book: This Is What It Sounds LikeWhy you like the music you likeMusicians, bilinguals, and auditory processingWhat it takes to produce successful recordsAdvice for people interested in music and scienceFiguring out what you really wantand much more...Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Dec 23 2021
1 hr 45 mins
Pioneering treatments & saving lives | with clinical psychologist Dr. Alec Miller
Alec L. Miller, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist, teacher, researcher, author, and disseminator of evidence-based treatments. He is co-Founder and co-Director of Cognitive and Behavioral Consultants, a private group practice and training center based in White Plains and Manhattan. He is also a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Montefiore Medical Center.Dr. Miller is an expert in the treatment of stress management, adolescent depression, suicide and self-injury, borderline personality disorder, as well as Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and his doctorate in clinical psychology from the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University. Beginning in 1995, he headed clinical-research teams adapting DBT for outpatient suicidal multi-problem adolescents as well as contributing to the adaptation of DBT for other populations and settings including schools. He has authored and co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and co-authored four books, including the three leading textbooks on DBT with adolescents.  To watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/l-6pzl7-qqgIn this episode, we cover:How Alec’s interest in mental health emerged from a family tragedyHow did you know you wanted to practice clinically?Gaining clinical experience before grad schoolChoosing the PsyD route and other important considerations about choosing a program - e.g., clinical training vs. research balance)Bolstering your grad applicationHow to choose the right grad pathGrad school lifeTheoretical orientationWhat settings did you enjoy working in the most in graduate school?Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)Challenging stigmaBecoming a leader of DBTFrom hospital to private practiceAdvice for people who want to open a private practiceInternship opportunities at CBC for aspiring clinicians!What qualities do you look for in interns at CBC? And opportunities to get involved in Alec’s NEW nonprofit: Access Psychology FoundationDealing with the emotional toll of clinical work & self careWhy do you do this work, why with teens, and have your reasons changed since you began? How did you become a leading expert in the field, such that people call upon you all over the world to come teach, lecture, and speak about your work?The future of the fieldWhat is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went in life? Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Dec 16 2021
1 hr 33 mins
Creating a niche in clinical practice | Forensic & clinical neuropsych with Dr. Chriscelyn Tussey
Chriscelyn Tussey, PsyD, is the founder and President of Metropolitan Forensic and Neuropsychological Consultation, PLLC. She obtained her PsyD  in clinical psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and completed her predoctoral internship in the Forensic Track at Bellevue Hospital Center/NYU School of Medicine. She completed a one-year postdoctoral fellowship in Forensic Psychology at the UVA Health Center.  Given her interest in brain-behavior relationships and the frequent overlap she observed between forensic work and neuropsychology, she subsequently completed a two-year APPCN postdoctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology.  She is also the former Director of Psychological Assessment at Bellevue Hospital and a Clinical Assistant Professor at NYU School of Medicine. Dr. Tussey has been qualified as an expert witness in State and Federal courts. She is an invited speaker at local, national, and international conferences and has published on forensic and neuropsychological topics. She has also taught undergraduate and graduate courses, and is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at NYU.  Dr. Tussey is passionate about leadership and helping to cultivate future psychologists. She is involved in leadership positions both locally and nationally. In this interview, we covered:You are both a forensic psychologist and clinical neuropsychologist. What does this mean?What’s the difference between criminal psychology and forensic psychology?What are some examples of cases that you work on, both civil and criminal?When and how did you realize you wanted to be a psychologist?How did you decide that your PsyD program was the right fit for you?Why did you want the opportunity to teach in grad school?Did you look at both PhD and PsyD programs?What do you wish you knew before going into grad school?What is graduate school actually like? Challenges? Rewarding aspects?You did your clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital NYU on the forensic track. What does forensic work look like in a hospital setting?How do you cope with all the trauma that comes with this work?Can you describe a patient you saw in your training that left a mark on you or changed the way you view your practice? (The importance of mentorship)Why did you do two post-docs, one in forensic and one in neuropsychology?What does it mean to be an expert witness?How do you learn everything you need to know about the legal system and the law?How do you remain objective as a forensic psychologist when you’re called upon by attorneys to strengthen their case?How did you advocate for yourself to become the director of psychological assessment at Bellevue Hospital?What is testing and assessment?Why did you transition from the hospital setting to mostly working on your private practice?How do you spend your time as a private practitioner?What’s different about practicing on your own than practicing in a medical setting?Can you take us through a day in your life?What do you like the most about your work? The least?For audience members interested in a path like yours, where should they start?What skill, quality, or general factor has served you no matter where you went in life? Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Dec 9 2021
1 hr 11 mins
Ending sexual violence against children | Policy & psychology with Dr. Daniela Ligiero
Daniela Ligiero, PhD, is the Executive Director and CEO of Together for Girls, a global, public-private partnership dedicated to ending violence against children, especially sexual violence against girls. The partnership includes five UN agencies, the governments of the U.S. & Canada, several private sector organizations and more than 20 country governments in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, working together to generate comprehensive data and solutions to this public health and human rights epidemic. Dr. Ligiero also serves as the Chair of the Executive Committee of the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children.  Before she joined Together for Girls, she served as the VP of Girls and Women’s Strategy at the UN Foundation and developed the foundation’s gender integration strategy. In addition, she spent over 5 years at the U.S. Department of State where she led the integration of gender issues into all foreign policy and investments in global health—working with over 70 countries and over $1 billion in investments. She helped develop the first ever International U.S. Government Strategy to End Gender-Based Violence.  Dr. Ligiero also served in leadership roles at UNICEF, as Chief of HIV and then as Senior Program Officer in UNICEF Brazil. In addition, she has held positions at the World Bank and the US Senate, and has worked directly with survivors of sexual assault in a variety of settings. She is also a survivor of sexual violence herself, and has been speaking publicly about her story for the last decade. She earned her PhD in counseling & community psychology from UMD, College Park, ranked the #1 program in the U.S. Dr. Ligiero is fluent in 4 languages: English, Portuguese, Spanish and French.See the Keep Kids Safe U.S. National Blueprint to End Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents (launched Nov. 18, 2021).In this episode:What do you do as the CEO of Together for Girls?What is advocacy, and how is it helping to end sexual violence?If you could implement any policies right now for prevention and healing, what would they be?What barriers do you face as you work to change policy ?How did you learn to harness the power of storytelling to further your organization’s mission?Sexual violence - prevalenceHow did your interest in psychology evolve?Why did you choose to pursue your PhD in counseling and community psychology?Why did you decide not to pursue clinical work? How does that training still help you today?Clinical vs. counseling psychologyUsing your psychology degree for policy changeAs a survivor yourself, how did you cope with counseling survivors of sexual violence in your training?What was it like to work on Capitol Hill?How did you help develop an HIV response program for the U.S. Department of State?Being the HIV lead for UNICEF in Brazil and then the senior gender advisor for the Department of StateWhat does your daily life look like at Together for Girls?What skills are you using every day? Advice for audience members interested in psychology, policy, and social justiceWhat skill, quality, or general factor has served you no matter where you went in life?  Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Dec 2 2021
1 hr 12 mins
Finding flow at work | with I-O psychologist Dr. Jared Weintraub
Jared Weintraub, PhD is passionate about helping individuals, teams, and organizations to create, grow, and maintain purpose-driven, positive, and productive cultures. He currently works on the internal People Analytics and Reporting team at Deloitte and is an Adjunct Professor who has taught undergraduate and graduate Psychology courses. Jared has worked with start-ups, Fortune 500 companies, and organizations across various industries, providing internal and external consulting, coaching, and managing marketing and sales teams. He earned his Master’s degree from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology’s D.C. campus and recently received his Ph.D. in Applied Organizational Psychology from Hofstra University, where he researched Flow Theory - how, when, and why individuals, teams, and organizations can get into "the Zone." His most recent publication explored how we can use technology-based solutions to "nudge" behavior change to develop critical competencies for flourishing at work.If you're listening on the episode release date, have a very Happy Thanksgiving :) !!!See Jared on LinkedIn!Jared's email: jweintraub89@gmail.comTopics we covered:Jared’s inspiration from Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, the father of “flow”What is flow?The value of a psych major in industryWhy did Jared enjoy working in sales & HR?How did he discover IO psychology?How did his master’s in IO help him do his HR job better?What went into Jared’s decision to pursue a PhD in Applied Organizational Psychology?Is flow at work actually important?Do a lot of people achieve flow at work?What are concrete things people can do to start figuring out what gets them into flow?What advice does Jared have for people considering grad school in IO Psychology?What was Jared’s experience with research at his PhD program (and why was it unique?)?Practical grad school and networking tipsWhat does Jared do now?Advice for that person listening who’s nodding along and feeling really aligned with IO psychology - how should they get started after college?  Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Nov 25 2021
1 hr 23 mins
So you want to be a child psychologist? | Tips for success with Dr. Regine Galanti
Regine Galanti, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of individuals with anxiety and OCD; as well as young children with behavior problems, anxiety, and co-occuring disorders. She specializes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). She is the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology, a therapy practice in Nassau County, Long Island, and author of Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress.  Dr. Galanti received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Hofstra University.  Dr. Galanti works together with parents, schools, and teachers to optimize treatment for a child. She provides concrete, research-proven strategies to help individuals with generalized anxiety, panic disorder, OCD,  social anxiety, school refusal, selective mutism, disruptive behaviors, and ADHD. She is a sought after speaker who has been quoted in The Washington Post, Self Magazine, and Buzzfeed, among others. In this episode, we cover:How did you figure out you wanted to be a child psychologist?How did you decide which graduate programs to apply to, and why was program orientation so important?How should students go about figuring out which theoretical orientations they align with?Choosing between PsyD and PhD: orientation, training, research, and financial considerationsWhy Regine’s professors told her to go to conferencesHow did you piece together that you wanted to work with children again after having worked with adults throughout graduate school?Why did you open a private practice?How can we do better at communicating clinical findings to the public?What are important considerations to make when deciding whether you want to work with children or adults?Why Regine thinks it’s easier to work with kids, and why she loves itA day in Regine’s lifeFavorite and least favorite parts of the jobRegine supervises grad students in clinical psychology. In her experience, what kinds of students do really well with CBT therapy?Misconceptions about CBTWhat do you see a lot of graduate students struggling with?Grad school isn’t about just getting it doneSpecialist vs generalist practitioners - how do you choose which conditions you want to treat?What do you think people can/should do to maximize their preparedness for graduate school?What skill, quality, or general factor has served you no matter where you went?  Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Nov 18 2021
1 hr 8 mins
From psych major to CEO | with Deutsch NY's Val DiFebo
Val DiFebo is the CEO of Deutsch New York. For over 25 years, Val DiFebo has been one of the key architects of Deutsch’s continual success and leadership in the advertising industry. As CEO of Deutsch’s NY office, Val brings a wealth of expertise to the business of advertising and marketing.  As a leader that positions herself at the intersection of business strategies and digital techniques, since 1992 Val has continually redefined the Agency’s integrated multidisciplinary offering, allowing for the creation of rapid business solutions that impact a client’s business. Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, IKEA, Procter & Gamble, Samsung, Green Giant, PNC Bank, Sherwin-Williams, and The Michael J. Fox Foundation are a few of the blue-chip clients she’s touched thus far. Along with the Agency’s success, The Today Show, CNN, and other media outlets have all sought out her point of view, and she has been profiled in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fortune.  A trusted industry thought leader, Val is anything but shy when it comes to advocating for equality in the workplace. Her philanthropic involvement includes supporting early career playwrights and creative storytellers through her position on the Board of The Playwrights Realm, as well as Chairman of the Hearts of Gold Foundation, which assists at-risk mothers. Additionally, she is a board member of The ANA Educational Foundation (AEF), as well as her alma mater, Williams College, where she studied — you guessed it — psychology!In this episode, we covered: What is advertising, and how is it different from marketing?What does Deutsch help their clients with?How did your interest in psychology develop into an interest in advertising?What advice do you have for psych majors who are multi-passionate but are unsure how to take there next steps?Was it difficult to market your psych background in industry?Is it easier now for psych majors to enter the marketing/advertising industry?What do you look for in a candidate?How did you become CEO of Deutsch NY?What makes for good leaders and mentors?Are mentors people you actively seek out or do they just come about?What does your day look like?What do you love most about your job?What do you love about advertising specifically?How do you see advertising changing over the next couple decades?What skills are important to be successful in advertising?For psych majors who are interested in advertising, where can they look for positions they’d be qualified for?The power of yesGraduate school - necessary?Hope for psych students Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Nov 11 2021
1 hr 19 mins
Applying psychology to the legal system | with forensic psychologist Dr. Nicole Vienna
Nicole Vienna, PsyD, is a licensed psychologist  specializing in forensic and neuropsychological evaluations. She completed her PsyD in Clinical Forensic Psychology at Alliant International University - California School of Forensic Studies and her bachelor's at the University of Arizona. She is currently the CEO and clinical director of her private practice, Vienna Psychological Group, which collaborates with clients across multiple facets of forensic evaluation services. they provide detailed assessments used in legal proceedings and case development for both criminal and civil issues affecting adults and juveniles. They also conduct screenings for employment in public safety to determine if a candidate is a suitable fit for the psychological demands of the position. In addition, they work closely with families and educators to evaluate learning disorders, behavior problems, intelligence and achievement, and other issues impacting academic performance.Read more about Nicole's practice and training here. Book referenced: Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology by John Norcross and Michael SayetteIn this episode, we cover:What is forensic psychology?Do forensic psychologists always serve the court? What do you need to do to be called a “forensic psychologist”?How did Nicole land her internship if her PsyD was not APA accredited?Roadblocks in Nicole’s trainingWhy would you get a master’s in forensic psychology if it doesn’t lead to licensure?Why did you choose a PsyD over a PhD?Why did you major in sociology and criminal justice in undergrad instead of psychology?What was the biggest challenge you faced in graduate school?Tips on balance and time management in grad schoolDoctoral students are typically high-achievers. How do you advise them to embrace failure?Was it annoying to go through clinical experiences in grad school knowing you didn’t want to work in clinical settings?Why do forensic psychologists need to be clinical psychologists?What was it like to work at an inpatient psychiatric hospital during grad school?What was it like to work at a jail?What are important things to consider before working at a jail? A lot of people are drawn to it, but are scared.What does your day to day look like? What do evaluations look like?Do you work equally with the prosecution and the defense?What kinds of cases stick with you the most?What do you wish you knew before entering this field?Are there any practices in the criminal justice system you wish we would get rid of?What is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went? Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Nov 4 2021
1 hr 3 mins
Rewriting faulty narratives | with therapist Dr. Gerald Drose
For more than thirty years, psychotherapist Gerald Drose, PhD, has been helping his clients re-write their personal narratives, recognizing that the stories we tell ourselves limit our ability to love and thrive. Gerald works with individuals and couples, helping them with relationship problems; has published research on sex therapy; wrote a bi-weekly column on sex, love, and marriage; and has extensive couples’ therapy experience. He also enjoys supervising younger therapists, filling in the gaps left after graduate school training, and firmly believes in the artistry needed to deeply understand the people who come for help. His graduate school experience inspired his first novel, Bird Gotta Land (Amazon). Bird Gotta Land (book website) is a fictional memoir about a young grad student in clinical psychology. He learns that "in order to heal others, he must first face his deepest wounds." This book is a rare look behind the curtain of graduate school and is a must-read for aspiring therapists (or simply those who are intrigued by the experiences of therapists as they learn to explore the human condition).Born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina, Gerald received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of South Carolina. He lives with his wife Dina in Atlanta, Georgia, where the couple leads a psychotherapy practice with four locations. He has three grown sons and a granddaughter. In this episode, we cover:How and when did you know you wanted to be a psychologist?Is being a therapist a calling, or is it something you can weigh out?What compelled you to get trained in sex therapy?What do you work on with couples?How much self-confidence does one need to have before beginning clinical training?Were you always a natural at therapy? What is the role of intuition in therapy?What happens if you don’t like your client, or if your client triggers your own wounds?How had your learning to be a therapist impact your personal relationships?What did you learn about people - our tendencies, our mental health, our relationships - that surprised you in grad school?Why are you drawn to narrative therapy?How do you know when a client is ready to go to uncomfortable places?Can you get licensed in different states?What is the most fulfilling part about being a therapist?What have you learned about young therapists by supervising so many of them?What advice do you have for the next generation of psychologists?What is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went in life?… and so much more! Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Oct 28 2021
1 hr 18 mins
Check your ego at the door | with therapist Marty Maidenberg, LMHC
Marty Maidenberg, LMHC, NCC, currently works at a private practice called Pathways Psychological Services in NYC. He received his M.A. in Counseling for Mental Health and Wellness at NYU. Before he became a therapist, Marty spent over 25 years in the music industry, where he spearheaded marketing divisions at major record companies, founded and operated independent record labels, and worked as a talent manager for artists at multiple stages of their careers, including well-known names:Andy GrammerJoss StoneStingCarrie Underwood...and even Elton John!In this episode, we discuss many FAQs from psychology students about pursuing a path in therapy. Here are a list of topics:Marty's beginnings in advertisingWhy were you drawn to HR when starting in the music industry?How did you go from almost being hired for an assistant role, to an HR role, to becoming a top marketing executive at PolyGram Records?Building an entertainment marketing company (M Squared Entertainment) Working with talent like Andy Grammer, Sting, Carrie Underwood, Joss Stone, and Elton JohnWhat made you such an effective music marketing executive?What was it like to work with Elton John?Tips for standing out in the music industry?Why did you leave the music industry?Why did you want to become a mental health counselor?The need for mental health awareness in the music industryHow do your previous roles in the music industry help you in your role as a counselor?Was it difficult to make sense of making a career change later in life?Internal battles and revelations during training to become a therapistHow did you develop your therapeutic style in graduate school, and how has it evolved over time?What is grad school in mental health counseling actually like?What is it like to be a therapist?Steps to private practice and the difficulty of licensing examsFinancial concernsWhat advice do you have for listeners who are considering becoming therapists but aren’t totally sure? What questions should they ask themselves to assess if this is the right path?How do you switch gears from client to client?Flexibility in private practiceWhat skill, quality, or general factor has served you no matter where you went in life?  Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Oct 21 2021
1 hr 14 mins
The art of wellbeing | I-O psychology with Dr. Melissa Steach
Melissa Steach, PhD (I/O Psychology), is the Workplace Wellbeing Knowledge Lead at Herman Miller, a furniture company focused on inventive designs that improve the human experience. In her role, Dr. Melissa Steach helps organizations implement Herman Miller’s workplace wellbeing research and meet their ergonomic and wellbeing needs by focusing on their greatest asset: people. Melissa is a bestselling author and award winning fine artist with accreditations in positive psychology interventions as well as ergonomic assessment (CEAS I). She holds a Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology wherein her research focused on human factors and implicit cognition.  "Growing up in housing projects that were gentrified sparked my initial interest in the relationship between personal and communal identity. Having those same housing projects located blocks away from the city’s library, museum, and major historical sites - along with my mom’s artistic and décor flair that made our little apartment look like a magazine spread - exposed me to the fact that art, in all of its forms, can impact us profoundly. I didn’t know it then, but my subsequent search for self through living in many places, amongst many types of people and cultures, along with trying on a variety of different careers, are what led me to attain a Ph.D. in I-O psychology." - www.drsteach.comMelissa is also writing her 2nd book called The Intangible Environment, all about the unseen elements of workplace wellbeing. Look out for that in 2022!In this episode, I ask Melissa:What do you do as the workplace wellbeing knowledge lead at Herman Miller furniture company?In what ways do you incorporate ergonomics and human factors into your role?Why should we care about ergonomics?To what extent does research play a role in your work?What does your day to day look like at Herman Miller?What are your favorite and least favorite parts of your job?What’s the difference between I/O Psych and HR?Why did you fall in love with art?Melissa’s path from studio art, to acting, to teaching, to furniture staging, to ergonomics to I/O: How did studio art turn into a passion for ergonomics?What was the common thread among all the jobs you’ve had?You were able to get all this experience without a graduate degree in I/O Psychology. Why did you get a master’s and a PhD anyway?How did growing up in housing projects influence your love for psychology and design?How did you balance a full time job while going to grad school?What advice do you have regarding finding grad schools that support your other commitments: financial, personal, and otherwise?What advice would you give to psychology students who don’t have a graduate degree but want to get experience in business and design?What grad programs to look out for if you’re interested in I/O psych and the power of the built environment (e.g., environmental psychology)When should you get a master’s? And when should you get a PhD?What is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went? Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine
Oct 14 2021
1 hr 7 mins
To be curious for a living | with social psychologist Dr. David Pizarro
David Pizarro, PhD, is a social psychologist and Cornell professor (and director of graduate studies). His primary research interests are in moral judgment. He is particularly interested in moral intuitions (especially concerning moral responsibility, and the permissibility or impermissibility of certain acts), and in biases that affect moral judgment. He also has a general interest in the influence of emotional states (e.g., disgust, anger, fear) on thinking and deciding.See his publications and his website here. See his popular Ted Talk about disgust and political orientation here. See his really awesome podcast, Very Bad Wizards, here.This episode covers a lot of ground. Here's the list of topics:How David got interested in researching moral judgment and disgustWould David eat chocolate shaped like dog poop?Why is disgust a dumb emotion?Why is disgust sensitivity associated with political conservativism?Why is morality and disgust important to understand?To be a fair researcher of morality, do you have to attempt to put aside your own moral convictions?Why psychology?How did David get into graduate school?Knowing what he knows now, would David have gone straight through from undergrad to grad school?What do prestigious graduate programs look for in an applicant?How do you demonstrate positive qualities in a grad school application?Strategies to get research experiences (even when you don’t have prior research experience)Mentors and the freedom to explore in grad schoolBiggest challenges in graduate school: imposter syndrome, dealing with rejection, being productiveWhy do a post-doc?The competitiveness of tenure track - are you doomed if you don’t end up there?Start with curiosities, not with disciplinary labels!Do most psych undergrads go to grad school without knowing what they want to do with their degree?The value of a PhDIntellectual humility in academiaWhat skills are needed to become a successful researcher?Do academics just shout into a void?Why did Cornell hire David?David’s podcast, Very Bad WizardsAdvice for confused, passionate psych majorsWhy does David love what he does?Why academics shouldn’t overlook teachingWe should express more gratitude! To submit questions for future speakers and to get even more career tips, follow @psych_mic on Instagram and visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox!Music by: Adam Fine
Oct 7 2021
1 hr 28 mins
Getting unstuck | Organizational psych to therapy with Dr. Elizabeth Wierba
Elizabeth Wierba, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with an independent private practice in Ann Arbor, MI, and a lecturer in Psychology at The University of Michigan for 18+ years. Liz completed a doctorate in Organizational Psychology and a postdoctoral fellowship from the School of Information, both at The University of Michigan. Her career as a psychotherapist began with a postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology from Fielding Graduate University. She has worked in a diverse array of therapeutic, educational and business settings, and volunteered with several non-profit organizations. In this episode, we discuss:Liz realizing she didn't want to be a doctorWhat she wish she knew before grad school Bad mentorship experiences & changing advisors in grad schoolHow to find the right advisorsWhy organizational psychology?Realizing organizational psychology was not her passionHow teaching helped Liz decide she wanted to be a therapistMaking career pivots later in lifeWhy failure was a giftAsking others what you're good atRespecializing in clinical psychologyFinding her talent & passionWhy she loves being a therapistThe flexibility of private practiceWhat type of person would be good at therapy? How do you figure out if you're not?What skill, quality, or general factor has served Liz no matter where she went?To submit questions for future speakers and to get even more career tips, follow @psych_mic on Instagram and visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox!Music by: Adam Fine
Sep 30 2021
1 hr 3 mins
Inside the therapy room | with Dr. Claire CiliottaA job you think about in the shower | Organizational behavior with Dr. Heidi K. Gardner
Heidi K. Gardner, PhD, is a Distinguished Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Center on the Legal Profession. Previously she was a professor of Organizational Behavior at Harvard Business School. Dr. Gardner’s book “Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos” was published in 2017 by Harvard Business Press, and became a Washington Post bestseller. Named by Thinkers 50 as a Next Generation Business Guru, Dr. Gardner co-founded the research and advisory firm Gardner & Co, which helps clients across professional services, industry, government, and non-profits to drive change through smarter collaboration.Dr. Gardner has lived and worked on four continents, including as a Fulbright Fellow, and for McKinsey & Co. and Procter & Gamble. She earned her BA in Japanese from the University of Pennsylvania, a Masters degree from the London School of Economics in Industrial Relations, and a PhD from London Business School in Organizational Behavior. Topics we cover:Growing up in Amish Country - Lancaster, PAWhy Japanese language, culture, and history fascinated HeidiHow Heidi went from being a Japanese major to a manager at Procter & GambleWhat it means to be a leader & getting your team to shineHeidi’s Fulbright scholarship in post-communist Germany“As long as you are dealing with human beings, the value of psychology will always shine through”Why Heidi loves going to grocery stores in new countriesWhat is Industrial Relations? - Heidi’s Master’s programOrganizational behavior - the human component of businessWorking at McKinsey - culture, people, & workWanting a job you think about in the showerWhat does a PhD in Organizational Behavior give you?What is smart collaboration?How does Heidi apply smart collaboration today?To submit questions for future speakers and to get even more career tips, follow @psych_mic on Instagram and visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox!Music by: Adam Fine
Sep 16 2021
1 hr 2 mins
Let your interests guide you | A fulfilling academic career with Dr. Mark Blumberg
Mark S. Blumberg, PhD, is a professor, neuroscientist, researcher, and author who specializes in the fields of developmental psychobiology and behavioral neuroscience. He is currently the department chair in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Iowa. In addition to writing academic research articles, Blumberg has served as the editor-in-chief of Behavioral Neuroscience and authored several books, including Freaks of Nature: What Anomalies Tell Us About Development and Evolution. His research also appeared on a 2020 episode of the Netflix series, Babies. Research in the Blumberg lab at U-Iowa focuses on sleep: its development, neural control, and functional significance. Read more about Mark's research here.Topics in this episode:Mark’s research on: Why do we sleep so much when we’re young?Researching niche/obscure constructs and why that’s important to MarkThe uncertainty of sciencePlanning for the future versus following present interests and passionsNon-permanence of seemingly permanent decisions, like pursuing a PhDHow Mark got to love what he doesHorrible mentor experiencesHow to properly read a CV to assess mentor fitFinding funding for obscure research interestsPros and cons to an academic careerHard and soft salary academic positionsBeing a psychology department chairDeveloping a mentorship philosophyWhat Mark looks for in a student on his labWhat makes Mark a successful leaderWhat skill does Mark want his undergrads to leave college with?Advice for college students on getting research experienceGetting into grad schoolTo submit questions for future speakers and to get even more career tips, follow @psych_mic on Instagram and visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox.Music by: Adam Fine
Sep 9 2021
1 hr 12 mins
Reaching kids where they’re at | Nonprofit success with Kevin Scully
Kevin Scully, M.A., ED.S., is the development director for Students Without Limits, a 501c3 nonprofit based in San Diego that supports underserved and immigrant youth through mental health, legal, and continuing education services. Kevin has an M.A. in school psychology and an education specialist degree (ED.S.) and has worked with underserved and minority immigrant youth within San Diego schools for nearly 20 years as a bilingual school psychologist, teacher and education consultant. Given his experience and reputation within the school communities, Kevin serves as an esteemed liaison between SWOL and schools. Kevin uses his knowledge and experience to develop our popular Sensitivity Training Program for educators and Parent Programs. He also uses his expertise to connect students to key resources and provide quality intervention strategies and services to marginalized and struggling youth.Here are major questions we cover:What is Students Without Limits?How do nonprofits get funding?What piece of advice do you have for people who are interested in starting a nonprofit but aren’t sure where to begin?Why do you love working with kids?What clinical experience did you get with a bachelor’s in psychology? How was your experience working with at-risk kids?Why did you choose school psychology over clinical psychology?Considerations for people weighing school and clinical psychologyWhat is the difference between school psychology and school counseling programs?Why were you drawn to school psychology over school counseling?Why did you decide not to pursue your doctorate (yet)?Loan forgiveness opportunitiesWhat is an education specialist degree?What was the most valuable part of your master’s?Why did you choose to travel right after graduate school, and what perspectives did you gain from doing so?Why did you transition from working in public schools to the nonprofit space?Favorite and least favorite parts about being a school psychologistHow do you welcome criticism?What is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went?To submit questions for future speakers and to get even more career tips, follow @psych_mic on Instagram and visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox.Music by: Adam Fine
Aug 12 2021
1 hr 16 mins

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