Listen First Podcast

Chapman Foundation for Caring Communities

On the Listen First Podcast, you'll join host Adam Salgat as he connects with an array of fascinating guests from varied backgrounds and perspectives to explore how we can build better relationships both in our professional lives as well as our personal ones. Tune in for insight on mastering skills like active listening, understanding behavioral tendencies, appreciating personality diversity, conflict resolution, and practicing Truly Human Leadership. https://www.chapmancommunities.org/ read less
Society & CultureSociety & Culture

Episodes

102 - Empathy in Action: A Story of Transformation Inside Colorado’s Roaring Fork Valley
1w ago
102 - Empathy in Action: A Story of Transformation Inside Colorado’s Roaring Fork Valley
Discover How Our Foundation is Working Alongside Multiple Organizations to Transform the Entire Colorado Valley—You Won't Believe the Impact! ---- If this story of the Chapman Foundation for Caring Communities and the Roaring Fork Valley sparks your interest, we invite you to connect with us for more information on how we can assist your team. Your journey towards a more empathetic and cohesive workplace begins here: https://connect.chapmancommunities.org/f/organization-interest --- What you will learn in this episode: •The significance of effective communication and continuous learning in fostering caring communities. •Personal insights and experiences with the program's impact on increasing empathy and understanding among individuals and teams. •Strategies for cultivating a culture of care and the broader benefits of applying these principles in various settings. --- “Empathy in Action" dives deep into the heart of The Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado, where the Chapman Foundation for Caring Communities is sparking a revolution. Witness firsthand how empathy, understanding, and continuous learning reshape workplaces and lives. This compelling narrative brings you stories of transformation, showcasing the power of caring and creating a legacy. Stay tuned to hear from CFCC's Community Relationship Specialist and Facilitator, Mary-Margaret Thomas. She is a resident of the Roaring Fork Valley and has been a facilitator for 10 years. Mary-Margaret discusses the valley's history of change from her perspective, the skills that have stood out over time, and her excitement about adding the Our Community Serves class to her facilitating tool belt. --- 0:00-15:10 - The Story of Transformation in the Roaring Fork Valley 15:15 - Conversation begins w/Mary-Margaret Thomas
097-Got Your Six: A Conversation w/National Guardsmen
Dec 14 2023
097-Got Your Six: A Conversation w/National Guardsmen
So what happens when two 20-year military service members join forces to lead with empathy? Tune in to find out. The phrase “military leadership” typically evokes images of commanders and noncommissioned officers leading heroic charges or generals directing armies. In reality, however, most leadership in the armed forces is far more gentle. In little ways, all day long, at all levels, commanders and subordinates communicate just like in any other workplace environment. As a beacon guiding a ship through turbulent waters, effective communication can steer our military forces. It fosters trust, builds team cohesion, and translates ideas into action. The courses provided by the Chapman Foundation are a set of tools that create tangible actions to help make human connections and create strong leaders. But remember, all new skills, like a muscle, need to be worked on to become stronger. And to get stronger faster, it helps to have an accountability buddy. Or, in today's case, a Chief Master Sergeant in the National Guard. A little over two years ago, Matt Robins, a colonel in the National Guard, stepped into Our Community Listens course not knowing what to expect but looking forward to the opportunity to grow. While in the class, he met Jody Nitz, and as you will learn in the coming conversation, the two men have supported each other ever since. Listen as Matt shares how excited he was to bring Jody on as his Chief Master Sergeant in the National Guard and how they have excelled in their communication skills over a short time because they are both pulling tools out of the same toolbox, all to serve better the people they lead. Colonel Matt Robins has served the military for 22 years and was always drawn to fighter pilots as a young boy. He says he enjoys being “the glue” between broad strategic goals and supporting tactical leaders who are striving to accomplish specific missions. After serving at the Pentagon, where he used airplanes to positively affect the battlefield, Colonel Robins now resides in Clinton Township Michigan. He has been married to his wife for 23 years. They have two kids, two cats, one dog, and five fish. In his spare time, he likes building furniture, painting model figures, going out on his sailboat, and pretending to be handy around the house. Chief Master Sergeant Jody Nitz is also in his 22nd year of service. He originally joined the National Guard as a way to pay for schooling to become a registered respiratory therapist but quickly became accustomed to the military way of life. He loved the camaraderie and shared goals as they mirrored the many sports teams he grew up for. Chief Master Sergeant Nitz is thankful for his military family and also the opportunity to see many parts of the world and be immersed in various cultures. He now resides in Bay City, Michigan, with his wife of 15 years, two children, and toy poodle. In his free time, he enjoys anything outdoors, including hunting and fishing. He loves passing those skills to his children. He also enjoys gathering with friends and chatting about life over drinks whenever possible.
096 - Listening to Learn: An Educator’s Template for Building Teacher & Student Trust
Nov 9 2023
096 - Listening to Learn: An Educator’s Template for Building Teacher & Student Trust
Some would say that working in the education field takes a lot of smarts. To teach someone anything, you need first to understand it yourself, and then you have to break it down and go step by step to help build up their understanding of the subject. But what happens if your student doesn’t want to listen? Do you just keep repeating the information, hoping it will sink in? What if you stopped the lesson and chose to listen to the student about why they are struggling to hear you? Who is emotionally supporting the teachers? Our guest in today’s episode has been in the education field for over 20 years; he’s seen the statistics and believes in the significance of building a supportive culture for those he leads to begin improving those numbers and lives. His name is Jamie Bandstra. He is currently the Principal/Director of CTE & ASM Tech at the West Shore ESD based in Ludington, MI. Mr. Bandstra has over 21 years of education experience. He has been a classroom teacher, a principal, and the first Superintendent of a project-based learning charter school. His experience has taught him much about leadership, culture, and teamwork. Over the years, he has continued to sharpen those skills by engaging with the Chapman Foundation. Mr. Bandstra has a passion for building a healthy team culture to get the work done; in his case, that means connecting with students to help them excel in academics and grow as young adults. Listen as he describes his takeaways from all three of the Chapman Foundation foundational courses in our conversation. Notice how he uses the skills with students while on a canoe trip, leading some of them to share anecdotes about themselves that they “wouldn’t tell their therapist.” He defines how the essential Listens skills are aiding his team in building authentic trust and a common language to create a learning culture. And lastly, take heed of his deep connection with his family. Mr. Bandstra recalls a story of shopping for a Christmas gift for his wife that could have ended differently without his self-reflection skills kicking in. https://www.chapmancommunities.org/
095 - Game-Changer in Blue: Insight on the Power of Listening Skills in Policing
Oct 11 2023
095 - Game-Changer in Blue: Insight on the Power of Listening Skills in Policing
Conflict in the workplace: How do we define it, and why does it matter? CPP Global (the publisher of the Myers-Briggs Assessment) defines conflict as “any workplace disagreement that disrupts the flow of work.” This definition emphasizes that conflict reduces productivity. A worldwide study by CPP looking at workplace conflicts showed that 57% of the US respondents had NOT received training in how to manage workplace conflict, even though 95% of people who have received training as part of leadership development or formal external courses say that it helped them in some way. Policing is a profession that has many different types of workplace conflicts. While officers undergo de-escalation training, learning the Our Community Listens skills has led to many of them saying they wish to have this type of training at the start of their careers. That includes our guest, Sergeant Brian Brown, of the University of Colorado Police Department. As a teenager, Officer Brown was influenced by two tragic events: the Columbine School Shooting, which was close to where he grew up, and the disastrous events of 9/11. Witnessing those society-changing tragedies solidified our guest's passion for public safety. His choice to serve at the University of Colorado was no mistake, as he wants to affect young adults positively. Officer Brown has a devotion to making connections with others. He believes the skills he has learned in the OCL class can help make us a better society. Listen to how he applies them with his boss, the public, and his family of four kids. --- 0:00-3:05 - Conflict in the workplace 3:15 - Conversation begins w/Sergeant Brian Brown 29:30 - Skill Snippet on Powerful Questions
094 - Big Aspirations w/Erin Wojkiewicz
Sep 5 2023
094 - Big Aspirations w/Erin Wojkiewicz
What is emotional intelligence, and why is it vital in a leader? Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and regulate one’s emotions and understand the emotions of others. A high EQ, emotional quotient, as it can be referred to, helps build relationships, reduce team stress, defuse conflict, and improve job satisfaction. Researchers Van Rooy & Viswesvaran conducted a meta-analysis of 69 studies in 2004. (Meta-analysis is like a buffet of different studies.) Drawing on a vast amount of data, they concluded that, compared with average performers, strong cognitive ability was 27% more prevalent in top performers. However, high EI was prevalent in DOUBLE that amount (53%). Ultimately, a high EI means having the potential to increase team productivity and staff retention. That’s why when it comes to recruiting management roles, employers look to hire and promote candidates with a high ‘EQ’ (emotional quotient) – rather than IQ (intelligence quotient). Our guest today is alumni Erin Wojkiewicz from Green Bay, WI. Erin is the Assistant Vice President in Learning and Development at Capital Credit Union. She has worked there for 14 years. Erin calls herself a lifelong learner and facilitator, so she was excited to take the Our Community Listens course in October 2022. She explained that the class changed her and that she thinks these concepts are great and can help people personally and professionally. Her passion for that belief inspired her to enter the facilitator training program for Our Community Listens. When the trainees came together this July in Midland, MI, I had the opportunity to sit down and discuss the impact the class has had on the team she leads. Listens as she discusses her hope to bring the class to the entire Capital Credit Union staff and the community of Green Bay. Key in on her the use of her own EI when she shares how she recognizes DISC profiles, when it is best to sit quiet, and how her team has been able to stay productive because they are beginning to better understand acceptance vs. agreement. --- 0:00-3:35 - Introduction to Emotional Intelligence 3:45 - Conversation begins w/Erin Wojkiewicz 23:55 - Skill Snippet on the link between feelings and needs
093 - Trust in the Workplace w/Christine Mahoney
Aug 8 2023
093 - Trust in the Workplace w/Christine Mahoney
Welcome back to the Listen First Podcast! What happens when a journalist, trained to listen to people, takes a class on listening? According to A Great Place to Work, a critical factor in building a positive and productive workplace culture is having trust among the staff. But what builds trust in the workplace, and what does it mean for employees to experience? Trust can feel like a squishy word, even as it becomes increasingly recognized as an essential business asset. Telling them to trust you doesn’t work. You have to build a high-trust culture over time. A Great Place to Work states that this is done by focusing on components such as - credibility, respect, fairness, inclusion, and belonging. They say that we must listen to our co-workers as much as we share information or request tasks from them. For Christine Mahoney, a former journalist and college professor, building trust with her co-workers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, started quickly because, within her first few weeks on the job, she took the Our Community Listens course with fellow staff. The openness demonstrated in class built connection, and that has been beneficial in an environment that can be very fast-paced. Christine is the Public Information Officer/Spokesperson and is fulfilled when she talks about CU Boulder's fantastic men and women. As a journalist of 12 years and someone who naturally loves listening to people share their stories, you might think Mahoney didn’t have much to learn when stepping into the OCL class. But as she tells her account, you’ll notice a difference between listening for content and connection… ---- 0:00-2:55 - Introduction about trust in the workplace 3:00 - Conversation begins with Christine Mahoney 23:55 - Skill Snippet on Reflective Response --- https://www.chapmancommunities.org/