Now and Men

Sandy Ruxton & Stephen Burrell

What's it like to be a man in the 21st century? How are feminist issues relevant to men and boys? How can we engage in productive conversations about gender equality? These questions are being discussed more than ever. Our monthly podcast delves into these issues with experts such as practitioners, activists and academics. In each episode, you’ll hear in-depth conversations about a wide-range of topics connected to masculinity and the lives of men and boys, such as preventing gender-based violence, promoting active fatherhood, and supporting men's health. The podcast is hosted by two social science researchers, based on the opposite sides of the world: Sandy Ruxton from Durham University's Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (UK) and Dr Stephen Burrell from the University of Melbourne (Australia). If you would like to give us your feedback, suggest a guest, or have a question you'd like us to discuss, get in touch at nowandmen@gmail.com. And if you like what we do, please share us with your friends, and leave a review on Apple podcasts! read less
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Episodes

Inequality and Men’s Health - Prof Derek Griffith
2d ago
Inequality and Men’s Health - Prof Derek Griffith
Across the globe, men tend to have a lower life expectancy than women. Although there are still significant challenges facing women’s health, on issues ranging from cancer to suicide, men are faring badly. However, a closer look reveals that this picture varies significantly across different groups of men. Why is that? What role does masculinity play in shaping health inequities among men, and their experience of illnesses like prostate cancer? For Men’s Health Week 2024, we speak to Professor Derek Griffith about why an intersectional approach, which addresses issues such as economic inequality and structural racism, is vital to engaging with men and boys about their health and wellbeing.Derek is a Founding Co-Director of the Racial Justice Institute and Founder and Director of the Center for Men’s Health Equity at Georgetown University (Washginton, DC, United States), where he is a Professor of Health Management and Policy and Oncology. He also serves as the Chair of Global Action on Men’s Health, a global men’s health advocacy organisation. Find out more about Derek’s work: https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/0031Q00002J74ovQAB/derek-griffithFollow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrDMGriffithFollow him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/derekmgriffith/Global Action on Men’s Health: https://gamh.orgCenter for Men’s Health Equity, Georgetown University: https://cmhe.georgetown.eduEpisode timeline:Intro (00:00-01:28)Men’s Health Week and why it matters (01:28-02:34)Why an intersectional understanding of men’s wellbeing is needed (02:34-04:45)How health inequities manifest themselves in the US (04:45-06:01)The consequences of structural racism (06:01-09:35)The influence of masculinity on different groups of men (09:35-12:27)Understanding Black American manhood (12:27-15:10)Risk-taking (15:10-16:34)Men’s poor take-up of health services (16:34-19:52)Making healthcare more accessible (19:52-22:53)The costs of healthcare in the US (22:53-26:00)Break (26:00-26:07)Lack of discussion of men’s mental health in global policies (26:07-28:03)Men’s vulnerability and looking beyond individual explanations (28:03-30:13)What policy changes are needed (30:13-32:07)Masculinity and prostate cancer (32:07-40:10)Other forms of cancer experienced by men (40:10-42:09)Discomfort among male doctors (42:09-43:43)How we can engage with marginalised men and boys about their wellbeing (43:43-48:05)Fatherhood and (self)care (48:05-51:56)Conclusion (The structural dynamics of masculinity; The role of social class; ‘Dying of whiteness’; Relationships and women’s positive impact; Prostate cancer) (51:56-59:34)More info:Syndemics: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syndemic Tony Coles - ‘mosaic masculinity’: https://doi.org/10.1177/1440783308092882Tony Whitehead - Jamaican and African-American men, reputation and respectability:
Men in Politics as Agents of Gender Equitable Change - Dr Ján Michalko (ALiGN)
May 15 2024
Men in Politics as Agents of Gender Equitable Change - Dr Ján Michalko (ALiGN)
Why do most men in politics avoid describing themselves and their politics as ‘feminist’? If they do support gender equality, why do they prefer instead to be called allies, advocates or supporters? What does this mean in practice for what men politicians do to promote women’s rights, and address harmful masculine norms? How are they seen by feminist activists, women politicians and young people? These are vital issues given the power men in politics have to drive (or obstruct) change towards gender equality and preventing violence against women. They are discussed in a forthcoming report by Dr Ján Michalko for ODI, a global affairs think tank, drawing on case studies by research teams in Colombia, Liberia and Malaysia. We talk to Ján about the findings from the research, its implications for politicians, international donors, civil society and researchers on how to engage with men in positions of power, and what such men can do to promote the transformation of unequal gender norms, in politics and in wider society.Ján is a Research Fellow in Gender Equality and Social Inclusion at ODI. His research interests are in gender inequalities, political engagement, masculinities, feminist foreign policy, and youth. His work includes supporting the digital ALiGN platform at ODI, which brings together global gender norms research and lessons for transformative change: https://www.alignplatform.orgFollow Ján on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ján-michalko-phd-54719251Twitter: https://x.com/MichalkoJanFollow ALiGN on Twitter: https://x.com/ALIGN_GenderODI website: https://odi.org/en/Read the full research series, including the cross-country analysis and in-depth country reports: https://www.alignplatform.org/research-series-men-politics-agents-gender-equitable-change Episode timeline:Intro (00:00-02:20)Why ALiGN wanted to research men in politics (02:20-05:35)The political context in Colombia, Liberia & Malaysia (05:35-08:53)Challenges of comparing across contexts (08:53-10:35)Interviewing men in politics (10:35-14:02)The reluctance of men politicians to take on the label ‘feminist’ (14:02-17:19)Actions speak louder than words (17:19-18:54)The risk of falls from grace (18:54-19:53)Factors shaping men politicians' engagement with gender equality (19:53-23:59)Differences across political parties (23:59-26:23)The electoral cycle (26:23-28:40)Break (28:40-28:46)Focus groups with students & activists about their views on men politicians (28:46-32:44)Anti-feminist backlash (32:44-35:55)Barriers & enablers to progress for gender equality politics (35:55-38:15)What actions men in politics can take (38:15-40:17)The influence they have on wider society (40:17-42:08)Their reluctance to reflect on masculinity (42:08-46:29)Ján’s own story of how he got involved in this work (46:29-51:20)Conclusion (Interactions with MPs Tony Benn & Peter Jackson; Men politicians’ motivations for supporting women’s rights over time; Pushes for the Australian govt to address...
Conflict, Peace-Building and Hope: Taking Boys Seriously in Northern Ireland - Dr Ken Harland
Apr 17 2024
Conflict, Peace-Building and Hope: Taking Boys Seriously in Northern Ireland - Dr Ken Harland
Dr Ken Harland has been involved in youth work practice and research with boys and young men in Northern Ireland for the past 35 years. During that time, he has witnessed a transition from a culture in which violence and conflict was normalised, to one of peace-building and hope. But how were ‘The Troubles’ shaped by gender inequality? What impact did and does the conflict have on young men growing up, and on ideas of masculinity? How is it possible to reach disadvantaged boys and young men and help them find their voice in this context? And are there lessons for elsewhere from the political transformation of Northern Ireland towards peace?After being a community youth worker for 17 years, in 1996 Ken joined Ulster University and was co-founder and co-director of the ‘Centre for Young Men’s Studies’ there from 2005-2016. Since then he’s worked independently as a consultant, trainer, lecturer and researcher in youth and youth-related issues, and also works part-time as a Research Fellow and Consultant with Ulster University's longitudinal research initiative ‘Taking Boys Seriously’. In this episode, Ken talks movingly about his personal story, linking his early work experiences in the shipyards, to finding his passion in education, his relationship with his dad, and being a grandparent. Follow Ken on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-harland-26b237b5/Read more of his research: https://pure.ulster.ac.uk/en/persons/ken-harlandCheck out his book, ‘Boys, Young Men and Violence: Masculinities, Education and Practice’ (2015): https://link.springer.com/book/10.1057/9781137297358 and recent journal articles...‘Taking Boys Seriously: A participatory action research initiative demonstrating the transformative potential of relational education’ (2024): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01425692.2024.2315121‘Embedding masculinities within a gender conscious relational pedagogy to transform education with boys experiencing compounded educational disadvantage’ (2024): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14681366.2024.2301726We cover the following topics:Ken’s experience of living through The Troubles (01:14-05:22)The place of gender in conversations about transition away from conflict (05:22-08:45)How men were expected to be ‘defenders’ and ‘protectors’ (08:45-11:52)The dominance of the ‘cult of the hardman’ (11:52-15:34)Similarities and differences in masculine pressures in different contexts (15:34-18:36)The impact of the police and army as well as paramilitary organisations (18:36-20:17)Hopes for a better future despite the challenges (20:17-25:07)The experiences of women during The Troubles (25:07-26:59)What led Ken to work on masculinity issues (26:59-35:30)The establishment of the Centre for Young Men’s Studies in Belfast (35:30-40:59)Making sense of how masculinity influences young men's (and our own) lives (40:59-46:46)Taking Boys Seriously: The need for gender conscious relational pedagogy (46:46-48:33)Practical lessons from Ken’s work with boys (48:33-53:04)Conclusion: Moving away from a culture of violence; Challenging the notion that boys don’t talk; Social change in Northern Ireland,...
Trauma, Loss, and Healing from Gun Violence for Young Black Men in the US – Dr Jocelyn Smith Lee
Mar 20 2024
Trauma, Loss, and Healing from Gun Violence for Young Black Men in the US – Dr Jocelyn Smith Lee
The heavy toll of gun violence in the United States is having traumatising impacts on innumerable Black men and boys, many of whom will know one or more family members or friends who have died as a result. Yet there is widespread reluctance to consider the idea of vulnerability and victimisation among these young survivors. In this episode, we hear from Dr Jocelyn Smith Lee, who has herself experienced personal loss from the violence, about her work in the cities of Greensboro and Baltimore to challenge dehumanising narratives of Black men and boys and ensure that their voices and experiences are central to efforts to tackle the violence. We also learn about community initiatives helping these men and boys and their families heal from trauma and loss. Jocelyn is an Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. She is also the founder and director of the Centering Black Voices research lab, and the founder and project lead for the visual storytelling campaign ‘In All Ways Human’, which was originally funded by a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenge Award.Find out more about Jocelyn’s research: https://www.uncg.edu/employees/jocelyn-smith-lee/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jocelyn-r-smith-lee-ph-d-577b6015/Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrJocelynSmithIn All Ways Human campaign: https://inallwayshuman.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/inallwayshumanTwitter: https://twitter.com/InAllWaysHumanCentering Black Voices research lab: https://centeringblackvoices.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/CenterBLKVoicesTopics we cover:The prevalence of gun violence in the US and its unequal impacts (01:12-04:26)The social contexts for Jocelyn’s research in Baltimore, MD and Greensboro, NC (04:26-08:47)The impacts of trauma and loss from gun violence on Black men and boys (08:47-14:57)(Limited) possibilities for turning points and perceived life expectancy (14:57-19:38)Why we are so reluctant to talk about vulnerability and victimisation among Black men (19:38-22:19)The ‘In All Ways Human’ campaign that Jocelyn has created (22:19-28:30)Telling a different, positive story, through the life-course (28:30-30:49)The effects that police violence has on Black men and boys and their families (30:49-37:08)Services which play a more positive role in their lives (37:08-42:02)How we can help Black men and boys to heal from this trauma and loss (42:02-46:29)The impacts of the violence on women and girls (46:29-48:50)The disproportionate responsibility placed on Black women (48:50-50:22)The recent reduction in homicides in Baltimore, and achieving political change (50:22-55:05)Conclusion (55:05-01:01:14), including: The shocking scale of the homicides, from a young age; How masculine norms can obstruct men from talking about fear and grief; Links with episode 38...
Embracing 'Discomfort' in Work with Men - Dr Nate Eisenstadt
Feb 20 2024
Embracing 'Discomfort' in Work with Men - Dr Nate Eisenstadt
What is 'discomfort', and how can we engage effectively with men when they display it in conversations about masculinity, gender equality and violence? How can connecting with discomfort help to change harmful attitudes and behaviours? What are the risks and challenges in embracing discomfort, and how can they be dealt with? These issues are at the core of our discussion with Dr Nate Eisenstadt, drawing on his extensive experience of facilitating and researching bystander intervention and domestic violence perpetrator programmes in the UK.We also explore the training room as a microcosm of wider society, and how discomfort and fear are often weaponised by public figures to promote damaging, polarising responses to complex real-world problems. Drawing on his earlier research on contemporary anarchist practices, Nate reflects on the challenges and potential of community-based transformative (as opposed to punitive) approaches to ending gender-based violence.Nate is a Senior Research Associate at the University of Bristol in the UK, in their Medical School’s Domestic Violence and Health Group, and the Co-Director of Kindling Interventions, which delivers bystander leadership programmes for violence prevention, equality and diversity.Find out more about Nate’s research: https://research-information.bris.ac.uk/en/persons/nathan-eisenstadtLinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/nathan-eisenstadt/Kindling Interventions: https://kindling-interventions.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/KindlingIntervLinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/kindling-interventions/We cover the following topics:The 'bystander leadership' training that Nate is delivering (01:31-05:16)Why he and Dr Rachel Fenton set up Kindling Interventions (05:16-09:03)Advantages and challenges with the bystander intervention approach (09:03-16:27)Different ways in which 'discomfort' can surface in this work (16:27-22:39)How to respond to discomfort when engaging with men and boys (22:39-30:57)The role of skilled facilitation (30:57-33:39)Facilitators’ own experiences of discomfort (33:39-37:24)How discomfort links to the backlash against feminism in wider society (37:24-42:46)Vital ingredients for impactful work with men who've perpetrated abuse (42:46-48:55)How this research links with Nate’s work on anarchist and anti-oppressive organising (48:55-52:06)Key tenets of anarchism and links with community accountability (52:06-53:58)Conclusion (53:58-59:54): Overlaps with Jens van Tricht's episode; the value of uncomfortable conversations; shifts in work with men who've used violence; the resonance of Nate's work with wider political polarisation; and anarchism and mutual aid.Further reading:The Intervention Initiative: https://law.exeter.ac.uk/research/interventioninitiative/Rachel Fenton, Helen Mott et al. (2016) A review of evidence for bystander intervention to prevent sexual and domestic violence in universities (Public Health England):
Masculinity, Meat-Eating, and Vegan Men - Dr Kadri Aavik Revisited
Jan 24 2024
Masculinity, Meat-Eating, and Vegan Men - Dr Kadri Aavik Revisited
Now and Men is taking a break until February 2024, so in the meantime, to coincide with Veganuary and a new campaign called 'Vegan and Thriving' from the UK Vegan Society, we revisit episode 29 from June 2023, where we discussed masculinity and veganism with Dr Kadri Aavik. Between 2016 and 2020, the number of vegans in Europe has doubled from 1.3 million to 2.6 million. More and more people are questioning the consumption of meat and dairy for ethical, environmental and health reasons. The majority are women, but a significant number of men are vegans, too – and over 30% of Europeans say they are consciously eating less meat. In this episode, we explore men’s experiences and motivations for becoming vegan and how they deal with masculine expectations about food. Veganism and vegetarianism are sometimes portrayed as ‘unmanly’ and effeminate, whilst meat-eating is often associated with strength and virility. The meat and dairy industries are also major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions – might the climate crisis and increasing recognition of the harms caused by these industries be leading to changes in the behaviours of some men?Dr Kadri Aavik is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Tallinn University, Estonia. Kadri has written a book about her research in Estonia and Finland, ‘Contesting Anthropocentric Masculinities through Veganism: Lived Experiences of Vegan Men’ (Palgrave Macmillan, 2023). Research for the book was conducted as part of the project ‘Climate Sustainability in the Kitchen: Everyday Food Cultures in Transition’ (University of Helsinki, 2018-2022), funded by the Kone Foundation: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/projects/climate-sustainability-kitchen   Buy Kadri’s book: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-031-19507-5Find out more about her research: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kadri-Aavik and https://www.etis.ee/CV/Kadri_Aavik/engTopics covered:Why food and eating are gendered (02:38-05:02)How to define veganism (05:02-06:49)Kadri’s research with vegan men in Estonia and Finland (06:49-09:41)Men’s motivations for becoming vegan (09:41-11:20)Kadri’s personal relationship with veganism (11:20-13:33)The connections between meat-eating and masculinity (13:33-15:02)Gendered differences in diets (15:02-17:14)Men’s engagement in household cooking (17:14-21:32)Navigating family relationships as a vegan (21:32-23:32)The influence of patriarchy on human relations with other animals (23:32-27:42)What this has to do with climate change and ‘Anthropocentric masculinities’ (27:42-32:10)Barriers to veganism for men (32:10-37:33)The different contexts of veganism in Estonia and Finland (37:33-41:39)The extent to which veganism is a ‘privileged’ phenomenon (41:39-44:35)Achieving institutional as well as individual change (44:35-48:48)Veganism as a form of activism, not just a ‘lifestyle choice’ (48:48-50:45)Impacts of veganism on men’s relationships (50:45-54:12)More info: Veganuary (where people try being vegan throughout January) - https://veganuary.comThe UK Vegan Society -
Masculinity and Memoir - Blake Morrison on Family Life
Dec 13 2023
Masculinity and Memoir - Blake Morrison on Family Life
Blake Morrison’s award-winning, bestselling memoir ‘And When Did You Last See Your Father?’ is an honest and intimate portrait of family life, father-son relations, and the impact of bereavement. Since it came out in 1993, Blake has continued to revisit his family’s past through ‘Things My Mother Never Told Me’ (2002), and is ‘still working things out’ in his poignant recent book ‘Two Sisters’, about his sister Gill and half-sister Josie, published earlier this year.In this episode, Blake reads extracts from ‘Two Sisters’ and ‘And When Did You Last See Your Father?’, and we explore with him key themes in his work, including: sibling relationships; family secrets; men controlling women; male violence; transitions in father-son relations; youthful rebellion, and becoming a man. We also discuss issues around men, emotion and grief, the genres of ‘sib-lit’ and ‘dad-lit’, and the impact of feminism on Blake’s own development and writing. As well as a memoirist, Blake is a poet, novelist, and journalist. His published work includes the poetry collections ‘Dark Glasses’, ‘The Ballad of the Yorkshire Ripper’ and ‘Shingle Street’, and most recently, ‘Skin and Blister’, and four novels, including ‘The Last Weekend’ and ‘The Executor’. He’s a regular literary critic for the Guardian newspaper and the London Review of Books, and is Professor Emeritus of creative and life writing at Goldsmiths University. Born in Yorkshire, he has lived in South London for many years. Find out more about Blake: https://blakemorrison.netMore info about ‘Two Sisters’: https://www.boroughpress.co.uk/products/two-sisters-blake-morrison-9780008510527/‘Things My Mother Never Told Me’ https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/357294/things-my-mother-never-told-me-by-morrison-blake/9780099440727‘And When Did You Last See Your Father?’: https://granta.com/products/and-when-did-you-last-see-your-father/Blake’s ‘Top 10 books about fathers and sons’: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2022/nov/02/top-10-books-about-fathers-and-sons-blake-morrison-and-when-did-you-last-see-your-fatherWe cover the following in this episode:Reading from 'Two Sisters' (01:24-06:42)Blake’s motivations for writing the book (06:42-08:14)Why brothers don’t write about sisters (08:14-10:12)Examples of ‘sib-lit’ (10:12-11:47)The impact of alcoholism on Gill (11:47-13:46)Alcoholism and gender (13:46-16:04)Male violence and the efforts of adults to hide it (16:04-19:18)The significance of women in Blake’s life (19:18-21:02)The supposed stability of 1950s/60s family life (21:02-22:22)Reading from ‘And When Did you Last See Your Father?' (22:22-26:09)Why the book was so successful (26:09-27:47)The extent to which Blake’s portrayal of fatherhood was culturally specific (27:47-30:21)‘Dad-lit’ and other authors to read on father-son relations (30:21-32:28)Shifts in Blake’s relationship with his dad and how he saw him (32:28-34:41)Blake’s capacity for writing...
Why Feminism is Good for Men - Jens van Tricht (Emancipator)
Nov 15 2023
Why Feminism is Good for Men - Jens van Tricht (Emancipator)
How can men contribute to gender equality and justice in the world? What can they learn from feminist approaches? How can they break free from the limiting expectations of what a 'real' man should be, and become more fully human? In this episode, we talk to Jens van Tricht, the author of an inspiring book 'Why Feminism is Good for Men', now translated from the original Dutch into English by Liz Waters - and launched with this episode of Now and Men! The book offers an accessible and hopeful perspective on men and masculinities, connecting the personal and the societal, the abstract and the concrete, the theoretical and the practical, the serious and the playful. Jens describes himself as an 'idealist, anarchist, and feminist'. In our discussion, we explore Jens's own journey and how these influences have played out: from childhood questions about gender norms, to teenage angst and punk music, the Amsterdam squatter and anarchist movements - and finding direction through Women's Studies, personal growth and feminist practice. Drawing on these experiences, ten years ago Jens founded Emancipator, an organisation which promotes gender equality and social justice by engaging with men and boys about issues including work and care, violence and safety, sexuality and sexual diversity. Jens is also a board member of the MenEngage Global Alliance.You can find out more about Jens’s work at https://www.jensvantricht.nl and Emancipator at https://www.emancipator.nl/en/emancipator-2/'Why Feminism is Good for Men' can be purchased in English on Amazon, and is also available in Arabic, Dutch, German and Korean: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Feminism-Good-Jens-Tricht-ebook/dp/B0C579ZY14/ref=sr_1_3Follow Jens on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jensvantricht LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jensvantricht/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jens.vantricht.7We cover the following topics in this episode:What led Jens to write the book and why feminism is good for men (01:04-05:49)Jens's experiences as a child and how these influenced his thinking about gender (05:49-13:31)His 'journey' into feminism and formative experiences as a teenager, e.g. punk music and the Dutch squatter movement (13:31-20:20)Being a man in Women's Studies (20:20-25:47)What 'men’s liberation'/'emancipation' means (25:47-31:38)Seeing oneself as a human being rather than a man (31:38-35:06)Holding oneself to account as a man (35:06-39:18)Emancipator's approach to working with men (39:18-42:34)Why the process is so important (42:34-48:42)Why relationships, sexuality and intimacy are such vulnerable and insecure domains for men (48:42-51:10)The context of The Netherlands and its upcoming election in debates about masculinity and gender equality (51:10-55:25)Wrapping up (55:25-59:58)
The Art and Craft of Masculinity - Richard Bliss
Oct 25 2023
The Art and Craft of Masculinity - Richard Bliss
Richard Bliss is an artist and tailor based in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the North-East of England. He currently has an exhibition of work on display at Bishop Auckland Town Hall in County Durham called ‘The Quest for the Perfect Shirt’. We recorded this episode in person with Richard in one of the galleries, and thank the curator, Debbie Connell, for making this possible.In our discussion Richard explains how he, as a gay man, seeks to understand masculinity and men’s lives through the process of making shirts, often in public places or community settings, reflecting and responding to conversations with individuals or groups. He guides us through the exhibition, telling us about some of the pieces, the ideas behind them, what they say about contemporary expectations of manhood, how they relate to his own experiences, and the contradictions of a man practising textile art and tailoring and using it as a way to engage with other men.You can visit ‘The Quest for the Perfect Shirt’ at Bishop Auckland Town Hall until Thursday 30th November 2023: https://bishopaucklandtownhall.org.uk/gallery/current-exhibition/You can view photos of many of the shirts from the exhibition on Richard’s Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/richard_bliss_newcastle_/Or his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/richardne001There is more information about Richard and his work here: https://www.richardbliss.co.ukA second exhibition by Richard, ‘Workers’ Thread’, celebrates the contribution of working-class women and men to the history of County Durham, and is also on display in the Town Hall. We refer briefly to this at the end our conversation, and to the ‘The Mural of the Durham Miners’ Gala’ by Norman Cornish, which occupies a whole wall there.  We discuss the following topics in this episode:Why the exhibition is named ‘The Quest for the Perfect Shirt’ (01:25-06:38)Richard’s methods and why he uses shirts as his medium (06:38-11:04)Tailoring in public space and talking to people about masculinity (11:04-13:42)What Richard has learnt from the process (13:42-17:18)Favourite pieces from the exhibition – e.g. working with homeless men (17:18-24:14)The complexities of identity: being gay and being Jewish (24:14-30:50)Men and power at work (e.g. former Liberal Party politician David Steel) (30:50-36:53)How Richard got into textile art and tailoring (36:53-39:45)Ties and gendered power in clothing (39:45-42:41)Art and its social impact (e.g. Grayson Perry, author of ‘The Descent of Man’, 2021) (42:41-45:04)The influence of Durham and North East England, e.g. its working-class, trade union, mining history (45:04-50:01)Why the exhibition is in Bishop Auckland (50:01-55:28)Thinking about the future, and Richard’s next project on older gay men (55:28-59:55)For more information about the unique collection of galleries and gardens that make up the still developing ‘Auckland Project’ in Bishop Auckland including the Spanish Gallery, the Faith Museum, the Castle, the Mining Art Gallery, and the Deer Park, see: https://aucklandproject.org
Angela Saini - Patriarchy and the Roots of Gendered Oppression
Oct 4 2023
Angela Saini - Patriarchy and the Roots of Gendered Oppression
What is 'patriarchy' and where do its origins lie? How did it become embedded in societies from prehistory to the present? What part do we all play in maintaining patriarchal structures, and can they be dismantled? These are some of the pressing questions we discuss in this episode with Angela Saini, author of a fascinating new book 'The Patriarchs: How Men Came to Rule' (Harper Collins): https://harpercollins.co.uk/products/the-patriarchs-how-men-came-to-rule-angela-saini?variant=39997855268942Angela is an award-winning British journalist, currently based in New York. She teaches science writing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, presents radio and television programmes, and has written for National Geographic, the Financial Times, and Wired. In 2022 she was a Logan Nonfiction Program fellow, and a fellow of the Humboldt Residency Programme in Berlin. 'The Patriarchs' follows on from her earlier books, the critically acclaimed 'Superior: The Return of Race Science' and 'Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong'.Website: https://www.angelasaini.co.ukInstagram: https://instagram.com/angeladsaini/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasaini/We cover the following topics in this episode:Defining 'patriarchy' (01:01-02:32)'The Patriarchs' as a title (02:32-03:51)'Patriarchy' as a system (03:51-05:21)Motivations for writing the book (05:21-06:46)Animals and 'natural' male domination (06:46-10:32)Angela's journey exploring gender diversity in how people live (10:32-12:01)Matrilineal societies and why they are important (12:01-15:07)European colonialism and the imposition of patriarchal norms (15:07-16:08)The 1848 Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention and pre-existing Native American societies (16:08-20:14)Weighing archaeological, anthropological and ancient DNA evidence – the work of Marija Gimbutas (20:14-27:50)Colonial and patriarchal justifications for inequality, e.g. in Athens (27:50-33:43)Rise of the first states: organising around birth rates and defence (33:43-38:37)Putin's Russia as a model of the patriarchal state (38:37-40:54)Complexities of women and men supporting or resisting patriarchy (40:54-42:26)Shifting and reframing ‘patriarchies’ over time, e.g. Afghanistan (42:26-45:37)Hanging onto a positive vision of a radically different world, e.g. Iran (45:37-47:47)Explaining social behaviour and social change beyond biology (47:47-50:01)Angela's current and future projects (50:01-52:55)Conclusion (52:55-58:43)References:Marija Gimbutas: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marija_GimbutasIan Hodder: http://www.ian-hodder.com/Gerda Lerner - ‘The Creation of Patriarchy’: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Creation_of_PatriarchyJames Scott:
Hilario Sáez Méndez - 'We Are All Rubiales': How Should Men Respond to Spain's World Cup Victory?
Sep 6 2023
Hilario Sáez Méndez - 'We Are All Rubiales': How Should Men Respond to Spain's World Cup Victory?
The Spanish women’s football team have shaken the world – first with their incredible World Cup success, then by bringing into question the sexist culture of soccer, stating #SeAcabó ('It's Over') and striking en masse in protest about their treatment by the football authorities. This was after the President of the Spanish Football Federation, Luis Rubiales, was accused of kissing the striker Jenni Hermoso without her consent on live TV during the final's medal presentation ceremony. In this special extra episode, we speak to prominent Spanish pro-feminist activist Hilario Sáez Méndez about how men have responded to the #SeAcabó movement, and how we can understand these events in the context of wider debates about gender equality, masculinity and men's violence against women in football and Spanish society. Hilario highlights the emergence of a stronger feminist consciousness in recent years, including: The #Cuéntalo ('tell it') movement after the horrific 2016 La Manada ('wolf pack') rape case in Pamplona: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/23/wolf-pack-case-spain-feminism-far-right-voxThe women’s strike in 2018 denouncing sexual discrimination, domestic violence and the gender pay gap: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/08/spanish-women-give-up-work-for-a-day-in-first-feminist-strikeThe 'solo sí es sí' ('only yes means yes') law passed in 2022: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/aug/25/spain-only-yes-means-yes-sexual-consent-bill-expected-to-become-lawHe questions whether the statement by Cadiz's men’s football team - "we are all Jenni" - should in fact be "we are all Rubiales", recognising men's responsibility to address our own sexist behaviour, and that of other men: https://apnews.com/article/sevilla-hermoso-rubiales-kiss-tshirts-73b711b6412c729ec1a320f0f21d60f9Hilario is a sociologist, the President of the Fundación Iniciativa Social (Social Initiative Foundation), and an active member of Red de Hombres por la Igualdad (Men's Network for Equality) and MenEngage Iberia.Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/hilariosaezLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hilario-sáez-12801928/Read the statement from MenEngage Iberia, expressing their revulsion at the behaviour of Luis Rubiales: https://menengage.org/stories/the-actions-of-the-spanish-football-president-are-unworthy-of-his-position-and-of-the-institution-and-the-sport-he-represents/MenEngage Iberia: https://twitter.com/MenEngageIberiaMenEngage Alliance: https://menengage.orgFundación...
Dr Lisa Sugiura – Incels and the Manosphere: Realities and Responses
Aug 30 2023
Dr Lisa Sugiura – Incels and the Manosphere: Realities and Responses
‘The Manosphere’ is a cluster of online groups who oppose feminism and believe that men are the true victims of gender inequality. There has long been backlash towards feminism, but its influence has grown in recent years, facilitated by the internet. Such groups include Men’s Rights and Father’s Rights Activists, Pick Up Artists (who instruct men on how to manipulate women for sex), and Men Going their Own Way (who avoid all relations with women). Incels, or ‘Involuntary Celibates’, have drawn most attention, not least because of a number of mass killings being ascribed to individuals associated with them. So what are Incel communities, why are they a cause of concern, and how should we respond to them? These are some of the issues we explore with expert Dr Lisa Sugiura.Lisa is a Reader in Cybercrime and Gender in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Portsmouth in the UK. She is the Chair of Hampshire Constabulary's Force Strategic Independent Advisory Group.In 2021 she wrote a book called ‘The Incel Rebellion: The Rise of the Manosphere and the Virtual War Against Women’. It is available to buy or read open access as an e-book here: https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/doi/10.1108/9781839822544Find out more about Lisa’s work: https://www.port.ac.uk/about-us/structure-and-governance/our-people/our-staff/lisa-sugiuraFollow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lisa_sugiuraLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisa-sugiura-a5214431/Lisa has been working with Tooled Up to develop resources for parents and educators: https://www.tooledupeducation.comShe is a Fellow of the Institute for Research on Male Supremacism: https://theirms.orgRead their recommendations for media reporting on Incels: https://theirms.org/forjournalistsIn this episode we also discuss an article by Alessia Tranchese and Lisa on ‘How Incels and mainstream pornography speak the same extreme language of misogyny’: https://doi.org/10.1177/1077801221996453And the book by Laura Bates, ‘Men Who Hate Women’: https://www.simonandschuster.co.uk/books/Men-Who-Hate-Women/Laura-Bates/9781398504653Lisa also mentioned the work of Prof Rachel Pain on 'everyday terrorism': https://doi.org/10.1177/0309132513512231We cover the following topics in this episode:What the Manosphere is and why we should be concerned about it (01:00 - 05:21)The ideas and terminology used by Incels (05:21 - 08:28)How women are viewed within Incel communities (08:28 - 09:58)What led Lisa to carry out research in this area (09:58 - 14:02)How she went about conducting her research (14:02 - 15:59)Interviewing men in the Incel community...
Prof Michael Flood - Engaging Men and Boys: Theory and Evidence
Aug 2 2023
Prof Michael Flood - Engaging Men and Boys: Theory and Evidence
Work with men and boys has been growing rapidly in the last 30 years, especially around the issues of preventing violence and abuse, building gender equality, promoting fatherhood, and health and wellbeing. To what extent is this a positive development? What are some of the opportunities, challenges and problems that engaging men and boys brings? And how can this work be delivered most effectively, to have a serious impact in tackling issues such as gender-based violence? There are few experts around the world better equipped to provide answers to these questions than Prof Michael Flood. He gives an in-depth, critical overview of the ‘engaging men’ field, and discusses his own story of being an anti-sexist activist since the 1980s. He also explains why it’s vital to think about issues like pornography and online misogyny in this work, and gives some pointers for parents in how to address these issues with children, and sons in particular. Michael is a Professor in the School of Justice at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. He has written numerous academic publications on issues including violence against women and violence prevention, men and masculinities, pro-feminist men’s advocacy, male heterosexuality, fathering, and pornography. This includes a book with Palgrave Macmillan in 2019, ‘Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention’. He also runs the website XY Online, which is full of resources on men, masculinities and gender politics.More info about Michael’s work: https://www.qut.edu.au/about/our-people/academic-profiles/m.floodFollow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MichaelGLFloodLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-flood-5b906713/Read his book: https://xyonline.net/content/new-book-engaging-men-and-boys-violence-preventionCheck out XY Online: https://xyonline.netResources on men’s roles in ending violence against women: https://xyonline.net/content/engaging-men-violence-prevention-key-resourcesRead his articles mentioned in the episode:‘Work with men to end violence against women: A critical stocktake’ (2015) - https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2015.1070435‘Lust, trust and latex: Why young heterosexual men do not use condoms’ (2003) - https://doi.org/10.1080/1369105011000028273In this episode we cover the following topics: Why the ‘engaging men’ field has been growing, and why that’s a good thingKey lessons from research about how to engage with men and boysIssues of concern in the development of this workMistakes which can arise in work by and with men and boysThe tensions of having a public platform as a pro-feminist academic and activistThe usefulness of terms such as ‘toxic’ and ‘healthy’ masculinityTrends in work with men which should give us optimismWhy it’s important to think about pornography when addressing sexual...
Prof Sanjay Srivastava and Dr Romit Chowdhury - Masculinities and City-Life in India and Beyond
Jul 5 2023
Prof Sanjay Srivastava and Dr Romit Chowdhury - Masculinities and City-Life in India and Beyond
How do different groups of men navigate urban life and enact masculinity in the bustling metropolises of contempory Indian society? In this special 30th episode, marking two years of Now and Men, we speak to Prof Sanjay Srivastava and Dr Romit Chowdhury about the ways in which male power and privilege is both threatened and re-asserted in different city spaces in India and beyond, considering issues such as nationalism, consumerism, violence against women, mobility, and relations between men. We discuss Sanjay's recent book, ‘Masculinity, Consumerism, and the Post-National Indian City: Streets, Neighbourhoods, Home’ (Cambridge University Press, 2022), and Romit's which comes out in August 2023, ‘City of Men: Masculinities and Everyday Morality on Public Transport’ (Rutgers University Press).Sanjay Srivastava is a British Academy Global Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at SOAS, University of London, and a Visiting Research Professor at Shiv Nadar University in Delhi. He has published numerous academic books and articles on topics including gender, urban social life, consumerism, middle-class cultures and the relationship between new forms of work and identity. More info about his work: https://www.soas.ac.uk/about/sanjay-srivastavaBuy his book: https://www.cambridge.org/us/universitypress/subjects/sociology/sociology-gender/masculinity-consumerism-and-post-national-indian-city-streets-neighbourhoods-homeWatch Sanjay discussing his article ‘Thrilling Affects: Sexuality, Masculinity, the City and ‘Indian Traditions’ in the Contemporary Hindi ‘Detective’ Novel’: https://vimeo.com/100405661Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sanjays54451327Romit Chowdhury is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Erasmus University College in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. His research interests are in urban studies, masculinity studies, ethnography, and literary theory. Prior to his research on men and transport he has explored masculinities in the contexts of men's rights movements, sexual violence, caregiving, and men doing feminist research and activism in India.More info about his work: https://www.eur.nl/en/people/romit-chowdhuryBuy his book: https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/city-of-men/9781978829503Watch Romit discussing his award-winning article, 'The social life of transport infrastructures: Masculinities and everyday mobilities in Kolkata': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWK2gbbqfAYFollow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/chowdhury_romitWe cover the following topics in this episode: Why study masculinity and urban life Consumerism and the ‘post-national’ city in India, and what it has to do with genderHarassment and violence towards women in public spacesRomit’s research with male autorickshaw drivers and taxi drivers in...
Dr Kadri Aavik - Masculinity, Meat-Eating, and Vegan Men
Jun 7 2023
Dr Kadri Aavik - Masculinity, Meat-Eating, and Vegan Men
Between 2016 and 2020, the number of vegans in Europe has doubled from 1.3 million to 2.6 million. More and more people are questioning the consumption of meat and dairy for ethical, environmental and health reasons. The majority of these people are women, but there are a significant number of men who are vegans, too – and over 30% of Europeans say they are consciously eating less meat. In this episode, we explore men’s experiences and motivations for becoming vegan, and how they deal with masculine norms and expectations about food. For instance, veganism and vegetarianism are sometimes portrayed as ‘unmanly’ and effeminate, whilst meat-eating is often associated with strength, virility, and masculinity. The meat and dairy industries are also major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions – might the climate crisis and increasing recognition of the harms caused by these industries be leading to changes in the attitudes and behaviours of some men?We speak to Dr Kadri Aavik, who is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Tallinn University, Estonia. Kadri has written a book about her research in Estonia and Finland on men and veganism, which has been published this year by Palgrave Macmillan: ‘Contesting Anthropocentric Masculinities through Veganism: Lived Experiences of Vegan Men’. Research for the book was conducted as part of the project ‘Climate Sustainability in the Kitchen: Everyday Food Cultures in Transition’ (University of Helsinki, 2018-2022), funded by the Kone Foundation: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/projects/climate-sustainability-kitchen   Buy Kadri’s book: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-031-19507-5Find out more about her research: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kadri-Aavik and https://www.etis.ee/CV/Kadri_Aavik/engWe cover the following topics in this episode:Why food and eating are gendered (02:38-05:02)How to define veganism (05:02-06:49)Kadri’s research with vegan men in Estonia and Finland (06:49-09:41)Men’s motivations for becoming vegan (09:41-11:20)Kadri’s own relationship with veganism (11:20-13:33)The connections between meat-eating and masculinity (13:33-15:02)Gendered differences in diets (15:02-17:14)Men’s engagement in household cooking (17:14-21:32)Navigating family relationships as a vegan (21:32-23:32)The influence of patriarchy on human relations with other animals (23:32-27:42)What this has to do with climate change and ‘Anthropocentric masculinities’ (27:42-32:10)Barriers to veganism for men (32:10-37:33)The different contexts of veganism in Estonia and Finland (37:33-41:39)The extent to which veganism is a ‘privileged’ phenomenon (41:39-44:35)Achieving institutional as well as individual change (44:35-48:48)Veganism as a form of activism, not just a ‘lifestyle choice’ (48:48-50:45)Impacts of veganism on men’s relationships (50:45-54:12)Explainers: Routledge Handbook on Men, Masculinities and Organizations -
Prof Jonathan Scourfield - Suicide, Social Work, and Masculinities
May 17 2023
Prof Jonathan Scourfield - Suicide, Social Work, and Masculinities
Suicide is a major health and wellbeing issue among men, with the UK suicide rate three times higher for men than women. There are clear links to issues of masculinity here, such as pressures on men to never show ‘weakness’ or emotion, or the idea that it is ‘unmanly’ to struggle with one’s mental health or experience failure. However, the situation is complex. Some groups of men are much more likely to take their own lives than others. The factors at play can vary substantially. And whilst they are less likely to die, women appear to be more likely to attempt to take their own lives and experience suicidal thoughts than men. Professor Jonathan Scourfield talks us through these complexities, and helps us to understand what masculinity has to do with suicide.Towards the end of our conversation, we also talk about other significant aspects of Jonathan’s work in relation to engaging fathers, child welfare, and social work with men more generally. For help and support:In the UK and Ireland, call Samaritans on freephone 116 123, or email jo@samaritans.org or jo@samaritans.ie - https://samaritans.orgCALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) can be contacted on 0800 58 58 58 from 5pm-midnight - https://thecalmzone.netThe youth charity Papyrus can be contacted on 0800 068 4141 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org - https://papyrus-uk.orgIn the US, call/text the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline on 988 - https://988lifeline.orgIn Australia, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 - https://www.lifeline.org.auOther international helplines can be found at https://befrienders.orgJonathan Scourfield is a Professor of Social Work in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Cardiff, Wales. He’s also a Deputy Director of CASCADE, the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre. He has conducted an extensive body of research over his career on topics including child and family services, working with men, social work education, identity and religion in children, and suicide and self-harm. More info about Jonathan’s work: https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/people/view/38087-scourfield-jonathanFollow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/j_scourfieldRead his paper, ‘Suicidal Masculinities’, in the journal Sociological Research Online (2005): https://www.socresonline.org.uk/10/2/scourfield.htmlHe also refers to the influential book he co-wrote with Brid Featherstone and Mark Rivett, ‘Working with Men in Health and Social Care’ (Sage, 2007) -
Jackson Katz - Democracy, Authoritarianism and Violence: The Politics of Masculinity in the United States
Apr 26 2023
Jackson Katz - Democracy, Authoritarianism and Violence: The Politics of Masculinity in the United States
Jackson Katz has long been a major figure in the growing global movement of men working to promote gender equality and prevent gender-based violence. He has also written and broadcast extensively about the central role of masculinity and gender in shaping political debates in the United States. With politics ever more polarised, authoritarianism and political violence – especially towards women – are becoming increasingly normalised, and figures such as Donald Trump and conservative media outlets are playing into patriarchal definitions of manhood and the family to appeal to the public.Jackson is an educator, author, lecturer, and social theorist. He is the author of ‘The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How all Men Can Help’, and ‘Man Enough? Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and the Politics of Presidential Masculinity’. He has also created a series of educational documentaries including ‘Tough Guise’, ‘The Bystander Moment’ and ‘The Man Card’. In 1993, Jackson co-founded Mentors in Violence Prevention in the United States, a widely influential gender-based violence prevention programme which instigated the ‘bystander’ approach. He also has a PhD in Cultural Studies and Education. Jackson recently founded the online advocacy organisation and guerrilla think tank, ‘Men for Democracy’, as a way to amplify the voices of men who support reproductive justice and democratic governance, and oppose rising authoritarianism and the increase in violence and misogyny in politics. Find out more about Jackson’s work: https://www.jacksonkatz.comThe ‘Men for Democracy’ campaign: https://menfordemocracy.comRead Jackson’s commentary pieces at Ms Magazine: https://msmagazine.com/author/jkatz/Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jacksontkatzInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/jacksontkatzLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jackson-katz-ph-d-b7785b3/Watch his TEDx Talk, ‘Violence against women – It’s a men's issue’, which has received more than 5 million views: https://youtu.be/KTvSfeCRxe8We discuss the following topics in this episode:The extent to which men are facing a ‘crisis of masculinity’ in countries like the US today (01:32 - 10:14) Why Donald Trump appeals to so many people, especially white working-class men (10:14 - 16:29)How US presidential campaigns have increasingly become the centre stage for debates about masculinity (16:29 - 28:51)How media such as Fox News have exploited patriarchal gender norms and contributed to political polarisation (28:51 - 34:18)Increases in threats of political violence, especially towards women, and how men should respond (34:18 - 40:26)The - often ignored - relationship between masculinity and gun violence in the US (40:26 - 49:49)What gives Jackson hope and motivation to continue doing this work (49:49 - 58:04)Why pro-feminists should be more ambitious in countering the seductive appeal of ‘men’s rights’ advocates such as Andrew Tate and Jordan Peterson (58:04 - 01:02:55)
Andrea Simon (End Violence Against Women Coalition) - Tackling Misogyny and Abuse in the Police and Beyond
Apr 5 2023
Andrea Simon (End Violence Against Women Coalition) - Tackling Misogyny and Abuse in the Police and Beyond
Responding to serious public concern following the kidnap, rape and murder of Sarah Everard by a serving officer, together with multiple other deeply disturbing incidents, Baroness Casey’s recent independent review of London’s Metropolitan Police has highlighted institutional misogyny, racism and homophobia in the force. The review found serious failings in the Met’s leadership, recruitment, vetting, training, culture and communications, and made widespread recommendations for restoring public trust.In this episode, we talk to Andrea Simon, Director of the End Violence Against Women Coalition (EVAW), about their response to the ongoing revelations coming out of the Met and Britain’s police forces; what needs to be done to take forward efforts to prevent violence against women and girls in the UK at this critical moment; and the contribution men and boys can make to that.The End Violence Against Women Coalition is a group of feminist organisations and experts across the UK, working to end violence against women and girls in all its forms. It’s made up of over 135 specialist women’s support services, researchers, activists, survivors and NGOs. Andrea has worked at EVAW since 2017, and before that she campaigned on issues such as child trafficking and modern slavery and spent more than a decade working for Members of Parliament.Find out more about EVAW: http://evaw.org.ukTwitter: https://twitter.com/evawukFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/endviolenceagainstwomen/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/evawuk/Follow Andrea on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AndreaSimon48We cover the following topics in this episode: The Casey Review of the culture and standards of behaviour within the Metropolitan Police, and responses to it (00:55 - 04:52)The gendered ways in which police resources are distributed (04:53-07:58)The extent to which reforming the police is possible (07:58-10:41)Seeking radical change whilst pushing for action in the here and now (10:41-13:05)Why prevention work is so important and what more needs to be done (13:05-16:57)The role of schools in prevention, and EVAW’s #AboutTime campaign (16:57-20:22)The contribution men and boys can make to ending violence against women (20:22-24:03)Tensions which can arise when working with men and boys (24:03-25:43)Shifts Andrea has observed during her time in the violence against women sector (25:43-30:03)What keeps Andrea motivated and hopeful in doing this work (30:03-32:26)Why an intersectional, anti-racist approach is so important (32:26-36:20)The impact of anti-immigration rhetoric on efforts to support victim-survivors (36:20-39:09)Backlash to gender equality from figures such as Andrew Tate (39:09-42:45)Tackling online abuse, and the UK’s Online Safety Bill (42:45-44:50)Bringing about political action (44:50-48:42)Why a feminist approach is so valuable (48:42-52:02)Further resources:EVAW’s #AboutTime campaign: https://www.endviolenceagainstwomen.org.uk/campaign/abouttime/EVAW’s campaign against online abuse:
Dr Katarzyna Wojnicka - Men, Migration and Masculinities in Europe
Mar 14 2023
Dr Katarzyna Wojnicka - Men, Migration and Masculinities in Europe
Some people migrate in search of work or economic opportunities, to join family, or to study. Others to escape war, conflict, persecution, or human rights abuses. Increasingly, people move in response to climate crises and natural disasters. Despite these realities, migration and migrants are often portrayed negatively by the media and politicians, with policy and legislation made more and more restrictive. Many of these people are men - however, migration is rarely discussed in relation to gender and masculinity. Migrating men are often perceived in purely economic terms, or as a ‘threat’, linked to criminality, sexism, and terrorism. But what do we know about these men’s actual experiences, and how they navigate masculine expectations and power relations? This is what Dr Katarzyna Wojnicka has explored in her research, particularly with a large yet under-discussed group – that of Eastern European men migrating across Europe from countries such as Poland. Katarzyna is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, based in the Department of Sociology and Work Science, and the Centre for European Research. She’s also an Editor in-Chief for NORMA, the International Journal for Masculinity Studies.Find out more about Katarzyna’s research: https://www.gu.se/en/about/find-staff/katarzynawojnicka and https://katarzynawojnicka.com Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrKandTheMen Follow her on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katarzyna-wojnicka-787a7072/ In this episode we cover the following topics:Why men and migration is a topic worth studyingThe main pieces of research Katarzyna has conducted in this area, such as her research on ‘transnational bachelors’The vulnerabilities arising from migrationWhy there has been little attention towards Eastern European men in research on migration in EuropeResearching this topic as an ‘insider’Why Katarzyna left PolandWhy she decided to research men and masculinitiesAttacks on women’s and LGBTQ+ rights in PolandSingle male migrants’ constructions of masculinityThe problems with ‘protective masculinity’What ‘hybrid masculinity’ means in the context of migrationWhy a ‘spatial’ approach is vital to understanding masculinitiesImproving public policy responsesThe war in Ukraine, refugees and genderPolitical discourses about migration in the UKFurther reading:Here is a selection of papers by Katarzyna which we discuss in the episode:‘Migrant men in the nexus of space and (dis)empowerment’ (NORMA, 2017): https://doi.org/10.1080/18902138.2017.1342061‘Self-positioning as a man in transnational contexts: constructing and managing hybrid masculinity’ (NORMA, 2017): https://doi.org/10.1080/18902138.2017.1341768 'Research on men, masculinities and migration: past, present and future’ (NORMA, 2019): https://doi.org/10.1080/18902138.2019.1622058 ‘Boyz2Men: Male migrants’ attitudes to homosexuality and what age has to do with it’ (Boyhood Studies, 2020):
Dr Demet Aslı Çaltekin - Refusing Militarism: Conscientious Objectors and Masculinity in Turkey
Feb 21 2023
Dr Demet Aslı Çaltekin - Refusing Militarism: Conscientious Objectors and Masculinity in Turkey
War and militarism often play a central role in the construction of dominant, ‘desirable’ ideas about masculinity. So what happens when men refuse to take part in the militarisation of society, and become conscientious objectors? Dr Demet Aslı Çaltekin has researched this with people who have conscientiously objected against compulsory military service in Turkey. We were planning to interview Demet before the horrific earthquakes in Turkey and Syria took place, and she very kindly agreed to speak to us about the impact and response, amidst the mixture of emotions that many feel at present. Whilst the main focus of media and popular attention is rightly on the disaster and its aftermath, it is also an opportunity to highlight some of the other complex issues at the heart of Turkish society. We therefore talk with her not only about her research on militarism, but also how the feminist movement in Turkey has been creatively campaigning against femicide and violence against women.Demet is an Assistant Professor in Criminal Law and Criminal Justice in the Law School at Durham University. She has recently written a book called ‘Conscientious Objection in Turkey: A Socio-legal Analysis of the Right to Refuse Military Service’, published by Edinburgh University Press.Find out more about Demet’s research: https://www.durham.ac.uk/staff/demet-a-caltekin/Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DemetCaltekinOrder her book, and save 30% with the discount code NEW30: https://edinburghuniversitypress.com/book-conscientious-objection-in-turkey.htmlRead her 2022 article, ‘Women’s organisations’ role in (re)constructing the narratives in femicide cases: Şule Çet’s case’: https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010012Please consider donating to organisations in Turkey/Syria undertaking relief efforts in response to the earthquakes: UK Disasters Emergency Committee: https://www.dec.org.uk/appeal/turkey-syria-earthquake-appealTurkish Red Crescent: https://www.ifrc.org/article/turkiye-and-syria-earthquakes-ifrc-response-dateINARA – International Network for Aid and Assistance: https://inara.orgWhite Helmets Syria: https://www.whitehelmets.org/en/In this episode we cover the following topics:The impact of the earthquakesThe relief efforts and the national and international responseWhat military service in Turkey involvesWhat led Demet to do this research, and think differently about militarisationThe conscientious objectors who took part in her research and their motivationsHow Turkish society responds to people who conscientiously objectThe right to conscientious objection, and its legal and social consequencesHow militarism and nationalism fit into Turkish historyWhat militarism and refusing to participate in it has to do with masculinityHow and why Turkish women engage in conscientious objectionParallels with...