PODCAST

The Louder Than Words Podcast

University of Essex

The Louder Than Words podcast is about ideas that improve lives. Professor Jules Pretty has created the Louder than Words podcast to encourage difficult discussions, to offer a platform to people making a difference and to explain how you can take action on issues you care about. This is the first podcast from the Centre for Public and Policy Engagement at the University of Essex. Louder Than Words shows how research delivers solutions to global problems, how we can improve people’s lives and how we can inspire people to take action now. Each episode of Louder Than Words will look at a key global issue and give you a chance to hear from leading researchers, policy makers, thinkers and campaigners plus those directly affected by the issue. The first and second series were produced by CommsConsult and presented by Martha Dixon. Series Three is being produced by Ali Walker at the University of Essex's Media Centre.

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Louder Than Words Taster
Apr 20 2021
45 seconds
Why freedom of thought mattersThis is EducationPublic History Mends LivesCOVID-19 and the CreativesGetting everyone activeBeing kinder, being humanStorytelling for Black HistoryImmersion in TheatreMy Body, Many ImagesIndigenous VoicesPatient Involvement Improves livesThe Babylab, children and natureSaving our SeasThe Web of LifeIs Big Brother watching you?This is our planetDealing with DisastersMarconi: unknown stories of the man who brought us wireless communicationThe Warner Textile Archive: Forgotten Pieces of Britain’s Industrial and Creative Past
Listen to the latest episode of the Louder Than Words Podcast to discover the story of the Warner Textile Archive and how Essex historians are helping unlock the potential of the archive for designers and bringing it to life for the public. Find out more about Louder than Words  Professor Jules Pretty from the University of Essex and journalist Martha Dixon speak to historians and archivists plus top designers who love using Warner textiles. Warner and Sons once provided the luxury fabrics which decorated palaces and featured at royal weddings. The Warner Textile Archive is now the largest publicly owned collection from a luxury textile manufacturer in the UK. The Archive is housed in the original Warner & Sons mill in Braintree that was refurbished in 2004 to hold the significant collection. The collection comprises over 100,000 items, including designs on paper, hand woven textiles, printed textiles, business records, photographs and manufacturing equipment. At its height, Warner & Sons were producing fabric for royal weddings and funerals, and decorating palaces. The family business pioneered several textile manufacturing techniques that have never again been replicated. Contributors:  Dr Alix Green, from the Department of History at Essex, is overseeing a project to digitise the Warner Textile Archive.PhD student Samantha Woodward has helped the Warner Textile Archive to develop a framework for further research into core parts of the collection and looked at ways to engage with users in the future.Robert Rose is Museum Manager of the Warner Textile Archive.Sophie Jemma is Archivist at the Warner Textile Archive.Cassie Nicholas is an Interior Designer and Winner of the BBC Interior Design Masters programme who has used Warner Textiles.Adam Sykes, owner of heritage fabrics specialist Claremont which continues to use Warner Textile designs in its ranges.
Sep 22 2021
18 mins
Brain injury
The latest episode of the Louder Than Words Podcast looks at the impact of brain injury. How do we find out more about the problems survivors face? What needs to change in the way we support them to live their lives? In the UK 700,000 people end up at A&E every year with a head injury, according to NHS figures and around a million people are now living with some sort of brain injury. Survivors include injured sportspeople, or road accident victims. There are also survivors who've been through things like severe infections or strokes. Novel research at the University of Essex is leading to a big shift in policy to help survivors, while also developing technological solutions to help with everyday tasks. They will be speaking to: Dr Andrew Bateman (4:29) from the School of Health and Social Care at Essex is project lead for COURAGE Network which brings together people affected by and living with, neurological conditions, with the research community. The innovative project is initially funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). Caroline Bald (8:01), from the School of Health and Social Care at Essex, is looking to improve training in the UK so social workers see that understanding brain injury is an integral part of their work. Chloe Hayward (11:33), Executive Director of the UK Acquired Brain Injury Forum. The Forum aims to promote a better understanding of all aspects of acquired brain injury. Dr Anirban Chowdhury (15:16), Lecturer in Neural Engineering and Robotics at Essex, is developing a brain-computer interface to control an exoskeleton to support movement, just through the power of thought. Stella Kerins (18:29), Head of Brain Injury Care Services at Headway Essex. the charity supports people with acquired brain injury and their families so that they feel supported and so that they can live their lives to their optimum.
Jul 8 2021
21 mins