CASH KID

The Cash Kid

Welcome to the Cash Kid Podcast! I’m here to teach kids and adults the financial literacy skills they need to start saving money early. Join us as we interview experts and explore topics to take that piggy bank to a real bank and start investing today to watch your money grow. “Cash Kids” are kids who at a young age have an entrepreneurial mindset and good financial skills to use their passions, hobbies, and skills to earn money. Just remember, anyone can be a “Cash Kid,” you just have to learn how to become one. So let’s be the generation to grow the greatest wealth and be the most financially literate. From financial skills to getting your first job, to investing in the stock market, we’ll cover it here on the Cash Kid Podcast. read less
Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

Overcoming Roadblocks to Teaching Kids Financial Lessons
1w ago
Overcoming Roadblocks to Teaching Kids Financial Lessons
Overcoming Roadblocks to Teaching Kids Financial Lessons Intro: So, you got some cash, maybe from an allowance? Or, that money your grandma gave you for your seventh birthday.   Here ya go, sweetie! Woo hoo! Thanks, Grandma! Whatever it is, what are you gonna do with it? Spend it? Hide it away? Or maybe invest it? Let's start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a Cash Kid.    What's up Cash Kids and here's a fun fact for y'all. Did you know that 57% of parents have some reluctance to discuss money matters with their kids? And 50% of America's youth will learn less than their parents?  That doesn't sound right. So, joining us today is the financial "dadvisor", Anthony Delauney.   Mr. Delauney is a certified family financial planner, and a behavioral financial advisor,  and the author of the award-winning "Owning the Dash" children's book series.  He's joining us today to talk about some of these roadblocks to teaching kids financial lessons today and how a more cashless society can be a challenging way to make money tangible for kids.   Plus, we'll discuss his book series and stay tuned to the end for a free giveaway.   Welcome to the show, Mr. Delauney, and first off, tell us a little bit about yourself.    Anthony Delauney: Thank you so much for having me. Um, so I have been a financial planner for the past 21 years. I started it right out of college, and I discovered pretty early on that I loved helping families.   Since I started, I got married, had children, bought my first home, bought another home, went through all those fun stages, and realized that, um, it's hard enough to figure out stuff on your own, but when you've got to figure it out as a family, it gets really crazy. And when it comes to talking to your kids about it, it gets even crazier.    Cash Kid: Mr. Delauney, we started to talk about how 57% of parents are reluctant to discuss money matters with their kids. Why do you think this is the case?   Anthony Delauney: The simplest answer I can give you is, I have spoken in front of adults, uh, for some time, for 20 plus years, and I am more nervous about this interview speaking to a child than I am speaking to adults. And I think that part of the reason that it's so hard for a lot of  kids to learn about these things is because parents don't know what to say or afraid of what to say. And sometimes we're intimidated around even having the conversation. They don't want to mess up for their kids.    Cash Kid: That's a great point. Why is it crucial that financial planning be a family affair?     Anthony Delauney: It's important because the sooner we start talking about these lessons and kind of getting the real basics of how life works, investing and all that stuff is really important, but really understanding how a budget works, understanding how money works, understanding  how to live life on your own, the sooner we can start instilling those lessons and teaching them, just like brushing your teeth.    As soon as you start to learn that, it becomes a habit, it becomes a ritual, and you become, it's part of your life. If we don't teach those lessons early enough, it becomes much harder to learn them later in life. And, once kids are on their own, it's, it's, we don't have as much involvement in the lessons that they learn.    Cash Kid:: Totally agree with that. And so, what tips do you give parents to start the conversation with their children around money?     Anthony Delauney: Sure. So, I think the most important part is, just like this conversation today, You are, you're the cash kid, but you have an intrigue. You have a desire to learn. And most children do have that desire.   Even as very young children, kids want to play grownup and want to do the different activities that they mimic their parents, the good and the bad parts of what their parents do. So, um, if we can, when it comes to talking to our children, treat them like many adults, treat, treat them, like respect them.   Okay. not judge them. I think that's the biggest part is when it comes to having these discussions, we want to be there for them. Let them know that they can they're in a safe environment where they can talk about things where they can ask questions where they can fail. But if they do fail, parents have to be really mindful of how they react because the kids are not only focusing on  the lesson being learned, but how are my friends, my family and others treating me?   Based on my response and my questions and my, you know, my mistakes.     Cash Kid: I totally agree with that statement. So do you have any financial lessons to teach elementary or teenage children?    Anthony Delauney: So I've had for, as I mentioned, being an advisor for 20 years, for families, I get the question a lot. How and when do I start talking to my kids about these various topics?   And one thing I've noticed as a parent and as a, an advisor is that sometimes when we try to tell our kids what to do, they might do it, and they might do the exact opposite. Uh, and a lot of times, children tend to learn through experiences, and through storytelling, and through, uh,  seeing something being done that's not just mom and dad telling me what to do.   Uh, so, I came up with the idea of writing children's picture books that each were stories, uh, that children could relate to, that children could see a scenario that they could be in,  And have those stories actually teach a basic lesson. Um, so I think we learned a lot better from trying to experience life through a scenario versus having somebody tell you what the scenario might be.    Cash Kid: Yep, definitely. So, uh, in one of the books behind me, it kind of goes through as like a. Storytelling motion or way to help me like and other just readers really relate to the story And so I definitely see how that's a good teaching skill or factor that you can use in your books So what activities do you instill with your two kids to teach important financial lessons?   Anthony Delauney: So my kids are now 12 and 14 years old. So they're, they're at a different stage where high school is starting to come in. And one thing I've learned as a parent is that if you don't have the financial conversations with your children on how to use money and how to even use credit cards and things like that.   They'll be put in situations through school or through other activities where they're going to be forced to make those kinds of decisions. Uh, my daughter recently had to go on a trip where she was by herself. Her parents weren't there. And she, while she was on that trip, um, out of state, she needed to buy food and do things of that nature at the location where they were.   And  if we had not discussed how these money tools work, it would have been a much harder scenario for her. And so she went into it with more confidence versus.  So, uh, I think that kind of from a very, very early age when we're talking about lessons and activities,  bring your kids into your life, even, even if it might be a little troublesome.   Um, if you do things with them that you have to do as part of normal life, go into the grocery store. Uh, and kind of going through all the things that you buy. And even though there might be some negotiating that takes place at the grocery store, you can talk about why, uh, and you know, why are we purchasing this?   How much do we have to spend on this? I think a lot of things that goes on with parents too, is that they're, they don't know if it's okay to talk to their kids about.  Because they feel that when they grew up, their parents didn't talk to them about it. But now we're in a society where it's a little more okay to talk about things, we just don't want to mess it up.    So, going through those basic things like, um, uh, going out to the grocery store or even sitting at the dinner table and having a fun game where we talk about, What are the things that might be on the family budget? I know the word budget sounds kind of boring, and even adults don't like the word. But if you talk about, if you reword it and say, what are the fun things, or what kind of things do you think we spend money on as a household?   And let's make it a game, where one person at the table names something, and someone else, and someone else. Kids and adults both love to play games. And the more we can kind of get involved and make something fun out of it, the easier it is to have those conversations.     Cash Kid: Yep, I was probably playing a game during school today.   Uh, so I mean, it's just so much fun. Um, so let's talk about our move to a more and more cashless society. How can this a movement affect kids my age and making money tangible when we never even see it? What problems can this create?    Anthony Delauney: So one of the things I've learned one of the biggest things I've learned as a planner for adults is that um we tend to do not recognize the, we focus on kind of the things we can see and we don't focus on the things that we can't see and going back to your point that we've become a cashless society.   We can't see money anymore. We don't see ourselves handing dollar bills, uh, at the gas station when we're buying candy or something like that. So it does become an environment where, because we can't see it, we're not aware of the emotion that's tied to it. And even when it comes to all those things that you hear about when, with investing and things like that, the key lesson that I think really parents really need to focus on is  Money and emotion are tied together, but they're opposites of each other.   Usually when you're making a decision based on emotion, it's not going to work out the way you want it to. And that applies to everything in life. If you look at fitness as an example. If you're emotional, you're probably not going to eat the thing that you know you're supposed to eat. Or you're probably not going to get the proper sleep or whatever it might be.   If you're stressed, if you're anxious. So, those kind of basic foundational lessons of trying to teach children how to be aware of their emotions in scenarios is really critical. It doesn't always have to be involving money, but if they're, if you're trying to help children be mindful of their mindset and how they're thinking, and if emotion is driving their decision making.   Then once they do have to start making decisions with money, they'll be aware of it. And that's one of the key focuses of the kids books, that I really try to give scenarios where emotion kicks in and children have to make decisions based on those emotional scenarios.  Emotion does play a big factor in everything in life.   Cash Kid: So tell us about your book series, Owning the Dash. What does Owning the Dash mean?     Anthony Delauney: So owning the dash was originally, um, it's a little bit of a sad story. Um, many years ago, well, back in 2015, I had a cousin who was very famous in the fitness world. Um, his name was Greg Plitt. Uh, and Greg was on the cover of over 250 fitness magazines.   He was really strong. He, he looked at his body and he looked at mine. You would think we're not cousins because we don't look anything. You know, we didn't look anything like, uh, but he, even before podcasts and blogging were really a thing would.  He had fans that would email him questions on life and fitness, and he would answer those questions.   And unfortunately, Greg passed away in 2015 unexpectedly. And as a way of trying to remember him, um, I would watch his videos and I realized that his philosophies as they relate to fitness could also apply to finance. Just like I was using the diet example before, uh, or the stress in eating and things like that.   Uh, a lot of these things in life, whether, when it comes to decision making, they affect all types of decisions. Finance, health, uh, just social affairs, all that kind of stuff. So, long story short, is, um, is a way of remembering my cousin after I would watch his videos, and I noticed that a lot of his philosophies were the same, so I decided to write a book about it.   And one of his philosophies is actually on death, and the idea of owning the dash, where owning the dash stands for on your tombstone, between your birth and your death dates. The dash in between and taking ownership of your life from a kid, you know, becoming the cash kid at a very young age to helping people out for the rest of your life.    Cash Kid: So, um, owning the dash is a book series. And so just talk about the books that you've created.    Anthony Delauney: Sure. So I originally wrote a self help book for young families with just kind of, uh, that's kind of one of the hardest stages is when you're starting off, not knowing where to go or where to get advice from.   So I wanted to give my. My best practice advice, uh, using the subject matter that a lot of young individuals understand, which is fitness. So fitness and finance brought together, tried to bring those worlds so, so people can understand. While I was writing my second self help book, my daughter, who at the time was about 12 years old, uh, would, uh, come down and write next to me.   And we decided to write a children's picture book where they taught a basic financial lesson. And that turned into “Dash and Nikki and the Jelly Bean Game.” And that book was basically about trying to understand concepts like delayed gratification, patience, compassion, all sorts of fun things that once again, the book hadn't, that didn't mention money at all.   It actually used jelly beans as a form of currency. Uh, but it highlighted emotions and scenarios that once you bring money into the picture, parents, kids will be able to better understand how they were feeling in that, in that other scenario.  So yes, the “Dash and Nicky and the Jelly Bean Game” received a lot of high praise and won some awards.   So why not, why not try to build on this? And, uh, we're now up to five books and a book number six will be coming out later this year.   Cash Kid: Well, I will definitely be looking forward to buying it. Um, so what's your goal with this book series and how has the reception been to them for them so far?    Anthony Delauney:  Sure. So a lot of times when we see financial books, just like the books I see behind you right now, um, they're really targeted at young adults or adults of varying ages and possibly maybe, you know, college age kids.   There's not a lot of  focus on very young individuals. And going back to the comment I made before, learn getting those foundational lessons in at a very early age, ages seven and under. Sure. If we can learn them that early, when we're willing to absorb the information, it's a lot easier than trying to learn or re learn things later in life.    So, um,  uh, yes, the thought process is if we can start introducing these concepts in schools, And in the in homes as well, but in environments where kids feel safe and they, they trust the information, where the information is coming from. Uh, if we can do that in those elementary years, it just makes life so much easier down the road.   Cash Kid: Yep. And that's one of the things we're pushing for, just financial education in the school system. So that way more kids can be introduced to it. It's just definitely something that should be pushed more. And that's one of the goals here. So, I hear you may have a free giveaway for our audience.     Anthony Delauney: Yes, I'm happy to, uh, my most recent book came out, which actually involved the what I would consider the most significant roadblock or thing that gets that prevents people from achieving financial success.   And it may sound odd, but fear of judgment is probably the number one thing that prevents people from achieving or even working toward their goals. So the book is called “Akash and Mila and the Big Jump.” And I would be more than happy to send out a copy to, to your listeners.     Cash Kid: Mr. Delauney. Thank you for that special offer for our audience.   So if you want the chance to win one free copy of his newest book, Akash, Amila, and the big jump, be sure to comment dash and send us an DM on our Instagram @cashkidpodcast. Please visit our website www.cashkidpodcast.com to get information on how to contact and follow Mr. Delauney.  Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid podcast and boosting the financial knowledge of fellow Cash Kids everywhere.   Cash Kid, out!   Mr. Anthony Delauney: CPA https://www.ameripriseadvisors.com/anthony.c.delauney/   Owning the Dash Book Series: https://owningthedash.com/   Instagram: anthony.delauney Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guest. This podcast does not intend to provide personal investment advice. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
The Cost of a Puppy-Financial Freedom-Financial Mindset
May 6 2024
The Cost of a Puppy-Financial Freedom-Financial Mindset
A one-time expense vs an ongoing cost. Do you know the difference? In this financial podcast episode with the Cash Kid, he'll explain why understanding this concept can help us achieve financial freedom and independence earlier in life. This is a way to help the next generation by building wealth instead of debt. Plus, a new segment on the show called "Stock Talk!" Listen in as the Cash Kid helps shape our financial mindset to think before we buy. Want to learn more about the Cash Kid? Visit our website and join our mailing list at: www.cashkidpodcast.com Also, check out our Cash Kid Merch store!   Transcript Intro: So, you got some cash, maybe from an allowance? Or, that money your grandma gave you for your seventh birthday.   Here ya go, sweetie! Woo hoo! Thanks, Grandma! Whatever it is, what are you gonna do with it? Spend it? Hide it away? Or maybe invest it? Let's start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a Cash Kid.    Welcome back to season two of the Cash Kid Podcast.    Last episode we celebrated our one year anniversary mark and now we are charging forward with more topics and skills to learn and teach.   If you aren’t already, please be sure to follow us today on Instagram and Facebook @cashkidpodcast. Also, head to our website and be added to our mailing list.    This is a great way to be a part of the Cash Kid movement to empowering the next generation to build super financial skills at a younger age.   This week, our episode is “The Cost of a Puppy.”    We’re not going to just talk about puppies…  even though, that would be cute and fun.    Our focus is discussing the difference between a one time purchase and an on-going purchase.    Do you know the difference?    Many times as kids, because we don’t pay the bills, we might not understand this concept and have to be enlightened by an adult of the difference. But, knowing what’s a one time purchase vs. an on-going purchase is a concept we need to understand, especially before we find ourselves in debt and having to sell back the thing we purchased.    Yep, it happens.   So, let’s talk about it.    What’s considered a one time purchase?   A car or a video game?   A bike or a cellphone?   A puppy or a remote control car?   Let’s start with a bike vs. a cellphone.   Before I knew better, I used to think you just purchased a phone and that was it. But then my parents talked to be about how a cellphone is not a one time purchase.   In fact, just this past week, my nine-year old brother saw this ad where you could purchase an iPhone 14 for just $5.99.    He was like, “See Mom, I can afford that?” My Mom then explained to him to look at the fine print.    Yeah, it’s that much smaller writing under the large discount price in bold that states it’s $5.99 a month for the next 36 months under a contract with that cellphone carrier .    Then Mom explained how you’ll also need a cell plan to go with that which can cost upwards of $30 dollars or more per month.    See a cellphone, while to a kid it just seems like an object you buy once and that’s it, is actually an on-going monthly expense… usually for your parents at this age.   My brother’s not getting a phone…   Now a bike on th other hand, it’s a one-time purchase.    Except for the time I wrecked mine and we had to spend a little extra to get it fixed.    But asking your parents for a bike is different. There may be some repair costs at times. Like a new tire or brake, but it doesn’t have an ongoing expense like a cellphone.   We’re going to talk about that puppy and the debate in our house over having one, coming up. More purchase comparisons on the way.   (Music interlude)   It’s time for a new segment on the show called “Stock Talk.” If you follow us on social media, you’ll see I like to talk about stocks.    Following different companies stock prices, what’s going on in the news about their company, and seeing the prices rise and fall excites me.    I’ve found more and more of my peers asking me about the stocks I’m interested in. Why I’m invested in them? And how do I invest?    Now, I’m not an advisor, but I’m trying to teach my friends and our audience how you can research companies and stock yourself.    So, each episode I’ll hit on a stock either I’m watching or researching and why.    This week, since we just finished talking about a cellphone, let’s look at Apple. Apple became a publicly traded company on December 12th, 1980. Their stock price started at $22.00 per share. Apple’s stock has split five times since it went public. This increases the number of shares in a company and makes the price per share at a more affordable cost for investors. To purchase a share today would cost you $173.   If you had purchased a share of Apple just three years ago at the price of $131 dollars, you’d be up $52 dollars at this point.   And here’s your disclaimer.   Keep in mind any of the stocks I talk about are not recommendations. This is for educational purposes only to see how easy it is to look at a company, analyze where it started, and where’s it’s going to learn how to invest wisely.    Hey, Warren Buffett researched companies first. That’s how he got started.  So, I’m following suit.    Do your research, and seek advice. Let’s educate, research, and invest Cash Kids.  That’s your “stock talk” for this week.   (Music interlude)   Alright, let’s talk about that puppy.    So many kids want a pet of some sort, usually a dog or a cat. But when you see an ad for “free puppies” just know that’s not true.    Kids don’t realize it but a puppy is a huge on-going expense.    My parents got a dog right after that got married and let’s just say, this dog racked up some expenses for my parents.    As a lab mix puppy he chewed through my parents deck so bad they had to tear it down.  Then he torn the hose pipe off the back of the house and my parents came home to a flooded backyard.    He chewed through the lines on the air conditioner at a friends house.  He only lived 7 years and it took 7 more years before my Mom would even consider the chance of getting another pet.    It was a debate for sure as my Mom knew, a dog could be a big expense.   My mom said we had to have a calm pet the next time around and we found the perfect one in Emma.  Another little pound puppy mix female puppy that is such a chill dog, she rarely even barks.    But even a chill dog still requires ongoing expenses like vet bills to stay up to date on shots, food, heartwarm and tick flea preventative medicines, and having to pay to board her when we go out of town and can’t bring her.    My parents have told me stories of how friends of theirs in college would get a pet only to realize a few months later they didn’t think through the expense of having a pet and had to either give it away… or have their parents take the pet in.    We were prepared for the expense in our house and the love of our dog is worth the expense for sure.    But, kids, the next time you ask for a pet, be wise and informed of the expense involved that a puppy is an on-going expense.    Not a one-time purchase or free.   I wanted to last talk about a car.    I’m about three years away from being able to drive and owning my own car sounds so cool. But purchasing a car is kind of like a cellphone but on a larger scale.    If you don’t have the cash outright to purchase the car in full, then you’ll have a monthly payment with interest usually to pay it off.  Then there’s gas and maintenance like oil changes twice a year, plus car insurance, and license and tag fees.   A car is an on-going expense we kids need to think about and start saving for. Many kids start having to get a job in their teens for the sole purpose of having the cash for a car.    So set-up a budget and savings plan to work towards that.  Calculate the cost of the car you want and think about the month’s expenses related to the car. Then you can be a prepared buyer so you don’t end up with a car… but no gas to get you anywhere.   So Cash Kids, let’s start being smarter about what we ask for and understand the expenses behind it. If we understand what’s an on-going expense vs. a one-time expense we can plan better and be more realistic about what fits without our budget. Understanding this earlier in life, can help keep us from instead of building debt, to building wealth much faster.    Remember, anyone can be a Cash Kid, you just have a learn how to become one. Cash Kid, Out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guest. This podcast does not intend to provide personal investment advice. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor, and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
One Year of the Cash Kid!
Apr 15 2024
One Year of the Cash Kid!
It's our anniversary! We're celebrating our first anniversary of starting this podcast with a talk with the Cash Kid on what he's learned from this experience, a recap of this last year, and what's in store for the future of the Cash Kid Podcast. Plus, a couple of announcements near the end of the episode (and bloopers!) Listen in, the Cash Kid Podcast is underway. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices   Transcript Intro: It’s our anniversary. This week we are celebrating the 1-year anniversary of the Cash Kid Podcast. We could not be more excited to have you join us on this financial journey as we work to build super financial skills for the next generation.    How did this podcast get started? Where are we headed? And what I have I learned from this experience?   Plus, some bloopers to share from recording this last year.   And stay tuned to the end for two special announcements as well.   We’ll discuss it in this special anniversary episode. Stay tuned. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So, you got some cash, maybe from an allowance? Or, that money your grandma gave you for your seventh birthday.   Here ya go, sweetie! Woo hoo! Thanks, Grandma! Whatever it is, what are you gonna do with it? Spend it? Hide it away? Or maybe invest it? Let's start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a Cash Kid.    Welcome back to this special episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. I can’t believe it’s already been one year since we launched this podcast. This podcast started as part of a school project.   In the 5th grade, I was asked to create a passion project. And for some reason, starting a podcast came to mind.   The first four episodes were really just me talking about what I’m passionate about and scripts I wrote while in class. We may actually go back soon and revise those some as they were written before we had a clear mission statement… or knew we were going to continue the podcast after the school project.   We got such great feedback on our first episodes and were told by many we should continue the podcast but we needed a clear mission for our audience. So, after producing 7 episodes for 7 weeks my Mom said, “I think we need to seek some advice and get some help.”   And so, we used my summer break to meet with a podcasting expert and get some guidance on what steps we needed to take to grow this podcast.   We set-up our website, cashkidpodcast.com, and a YouTube channel to publish our episodes. We started an Instagram page as well. But the main focus, was putting a plan together of where we wanted to take the podcast.   The mission was clear to me. I wanted to teach kids and adults the financial literacy skills they need to start saving and investing money early. My goal is to help my generation grow the greatest wealth with a slow and steady approach and be the most financially literate.   No get rich schemes here.   Since then we completed season 1 with 15 episodes. Then we launched season 2 which was all about building “Super Financial Skills.” This is currently episode 17 of that series.   So far, we’ve interviewed 15 different guests on the show that represent a wide range of individuals from a kid running his own car detailing business, to a financial advisor, tax expert, a high school finance teacher, book authors, and CPAs running their own training courses to help others get out of debt and start investing.   I have learned so much! And it’s affected how I invest and think about money.   What have I learned?   I’ve learned that running a podcast is harder than it looks. There are numerous aspects beyond just recording audio.    And talking into a microphone takes some training.  There may be a few blooper clips added to the end of this episode. My Mom likes to torture me and save them.   So stayed tuned to the end. She said I’ve gotta learn to laugh at myself when I make these mistakes.   Running a podcast has taught me you must remain persistent and continue to think outside the box. It takes planning and learning new skills.   I’ve had to learn how to write more and write faster than others my age. I’ve had to learn how to communicate confidently on-camera, plus interview skills, and editing skills in creating content to post on our social channels.   We also went from producing audio only podcasts to now an audio and video format these last two months.   Where are we headed now?   In future episodes, we’re going to focus on ways kids can make money. We plan to interview what we consider to be fellow Cash Kids who are using their skills and entrepreneurial mindset to make some cash, while still kids.   We’ll continue to build super financial skills by helping you all break down financial terms and understand what your options are.   We’re going to continue talking with others on how to push for more financial education in our schools.   We want to make money a more common topic in homes and encourage kids and parents to talk openly about money to build good habits early.   We plan to talk about how to research publicly traded companies and what options you have as kids to start purchasing stocks to begin your investing journey.   We’ll dive into the world of employment. How to find that first paying job whether a part time job while in school or summer job. How to be a good employee and build your way up!   And, ways we can give back with what we’ve been blessed with.   These are all skills to tie into having healthy money habits and a good money mindset earlier in life.   Remember, my motto on the Cash Kid Podcast is that anyone can be a Cash Kid, you just have to learn how to become one. That’s why we created this podcast. Time is on our side to learn these financial skills earlier in life and carry them into adult years prepared and avoid big money mistakes.   Now, I’ve got a few things to let our listeners know about.   First, if you aren’t following us on social media, please be sure to head over to Instagram, YouTube, or Facebook and start following the Cash Kid Podcast. We post content here between episodes with helpful tips and advice.   Next, we are launching a new Cash Kid Podcast website at cashkidpodcast.com very soon. Be sure to head to our website to subscribe to our mailing list.   And finally, I’ve wanted to offer this for months now, but we said we would wait until the one-year mark but we are now offering Cash Kid Podcast merchandise. That’s right, we’ve got merch!   We’ve got t-shirts, hoodies, athletic wear, shorts, mugs, and hats. I’ve been wearing my Cash Kid hoodie or t-shirt to school for a few months now and kids are always asking how they can get one. Now you can, just go to cashkidpodcast.com and select the tab for merch to purchase yours today. And watch for our instagram because we are going to do a merch and book giveaway.   We welcome you to become a part of the Cash Kid mission to build super financial skills at a young age.   We can’t thank you enough for your support. Honestly, your kind words to me and encouragement are overwhelming. It helps me push forward with a project that most kids my age don’t understand or would never attempt. Just remember, anyone can be a cash kid, you just have to learn how to become one.   Cash Kid, out!   Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guest. This podcast does not intend to provide personal investment advice. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor, and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
Wealthy Kids Investment Club
Apr 1 2024
Wealthy Kids Investment Club
In this episode, we capture an inspiring interview with Maya Corbic, CPA, who started the "Wealthy Kids Investment Club" to help parents and kids learn how to be smart with money early. Hear her incredible life story and what she's doing to equip parents with the tools to raise money smart kids. Stay tuned, the Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript  Wealthy Kids Investment Club Teach.Kids.Money It only takes one person to change the generational wealth trajectory of the family. Let that person be you. Welcome to another episode of the Cash Kid Podcast, where we focus on building super financial literacy skills for kids and teens to build a greater financial future at a younger age. If you aren't already, follow us on social media at CashKid Podcast and subscribe to our mailing list at CashKidPodcast. com. We have another special guest on the show today who works to change the generational wealth trajectory of families. Parents, you'll walk away from this episode feeling you have the resources to change your financial journey and that of your children. Stay tuned. The CashKid Podcast is underway. So, you got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you [00:01:00] for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie! Woohoo! Thanks, Grandma! Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it? Hide it away? Or maybe invest it? Let's start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Joining us today is Mrs. Maya Corbic. Mrs. Corbic is the founder of Wealthy Kids Club from her Instagram page, teach. kids. money, where she has over 133, 000 followers and growing. She provides some solid advice and steps parents can take to teach their kids about money and investing together. Mrs. Corbic, welcome to the show. Cash Kid: And first off, tell us a little bit about yourself. Maya Corbic: Okay. Well, thank you for that lovely introduction and thank you for having me on the show. So a little bit about me, I am first generation immigrant. [00:02:00] I immigrated from war toward Bosnia when I was almost 15, uh, with both of my parents and my brother, we lost everything in the war and we immigrated with two suitcases and 50 and I lived in government shelters, government housing, and when I was a teenager, I even had two part time jobs. So, um, I learned how to hustle and I worked very hard, um, to, you know, become, you know, in a better financial position. So I became a CPA and, um, when I got married, I had some student loans and so did my husband and we ended up paying off all of our debt, uh, including our mortgage by the time I was 32, because we were very disciplined with money. And at that Point in time, I, um, decided that it was really important to start teaching my own children about money. Uh, but also being a CPA, I learned from some of my clients that they were struggling with money. So I realized that the [00:03:00] root of all that struggle really started in childhood because a lot of the clients that I had were struggling with money because nobody ever taught them about money when they were growing up. Cash Kid: That's really an interesting story, and we definitely agree with you on your point. So, where did you get the idea to start Wealthy Kids Club? Maya Corbic: So, Wealthy Kids Club only, uh, was only started about three years ago. Uh, before that, for the past 11 years, I have been teaching parents about money, by going to schools and doing workshops. But then with pandemic, all that changed because I wasn't able to go into schools anymore. So I started doing more online workshops and still access the parents and classrooms that way. But then, um, I also started my, uh, Instagram account, teach. kids. money. And. When I was actually posting on that account, I realized that a lot of parents were coming [00:04:00] back to me because they were struggling with, uh, investing and how to teach their children to invest. Um, a lot of them were able to teach their kids, you know, the difference between needs and wants and budgeting. But they just did not know how to teach investing. And I realized that this is where a lot of parents needed help. They needed to learn some of the basics themselves so that they could teach those basics to their kids. And that's how Wealthy Kids Investment Club was born. Um, and, um, you know, I started that membership. I tried to make it accessible to everybody, um, regardless of where they are, um, you know, in the globe. Cash Kid: Yeah, tell us about your club and what parents and kids can expect to learn.   Maya Corbic: So the club, uh, it's actually currently undergoing a big facelift, uh, but, uh, essentially in the club, you start off as somebody who is intimidated, uh, an intimidated investor, and then you learn some [00:05:00] basics, uh, in terms of what investing really is and you That's not as scary as it first may seem to be. And then you progress and learn more basic stuff like investment jargon, who is who in the world of investing, how the brokerage accounts work, as well as what accounts are available to you. To start investing on your own behalf and behalf of your children. Um, and then you, um, learn about the power of investing in ETFs and index funds, which are my favorite investments. Um, and then if you want to do more than that, there are different lessons where you can learn about investing in bonds, um, investing in REITs, which are, uh, real estate investment trusts. Dividend stocks and so on. Um, it's a, it's a great way to go from an intimidated investor to a confident investor through a lot of, um, fun video lessons, as well as we have games and we have worksheets and we [00:06:00] have an active community where you can ask a question. Cash Kid: Uh, what do you hear? From parents about their struggles in teaching kids about money. So, as I said, a lot of parents struggle very much with teaching their kids about investing, because that's one area where, you know, they, they lack the knowledge themselves. Um, a lot of parents struggle with the concept of delayed gratification. And, um, you know, Teaching their children to save money. So usually for those parents, I tell them that there are different ways that they can encourage saving, um, money when it comes to their children. One of the things that they can do is they can put a certain as their children to put aside a certain portion of money when they receive it as a, from allowance or monetary gifts and teach the kids to pay themselves first. And they say that 95 percent of what we do, we do out of habit. So if we teach our children to do that, hopefully when they become [00:07:00] adults, they will not be able to spend all of their paychecks, but instead they will be putting aside a certain amount of money into savings and then eventually investing that money. And then I also like to encourage. Children, my own Children as well as I tell other parents to do this as well, but, you know, if, for example, if my child is saving for something particular, I like to match their savings, especially if it's something big that it would take them a long time to save up for. So, if my child saves 10, I will give them another 10 or, you know, you can give them more or less. It's entirely up to the parent. Um, you can also reward them by, you know, uh, doing their favorite activity or maybe even going for ice cream when they reach a certain, uh, goal or, you know, you can give them interest on their savings. So if they've saved up 100, maybe you can throw in an extra. 2 or 5 as interest, you know, to reward them for saving that money. Cash Kid: Yeah. So that's [00:08:00] definitely a good habit and it kind of leads into our next question. What are practices or habits that you implement in your own home around money and why? Maya Corbic: So when my kids were little, I have two teenagers now, so I have a 16 and a 14 year old, but when they were younger, uh, we used to give them allowance. And, uh, this was a weekly allowance. And the reason why I liked the allowance is because it transfers the purchasing responsibility from parents to the child. So instead of me deciding whether or not to purchase, uh, candy or a toy for my child, they had that Uh, decision that was the decision rested with them. So they were the ones in charge of that decision and they manage their own money very differently than, for example, they would have managed my money or the expectation of me spending money on that. Because. We, as parents, you know, we have a certain amount of money. We have our budget and our children don't really know what that budget is or how [00:09:00] much money we have in our bank account. So, you know, they're constantly asking for more. But when you give allowance, you are essentially teaching your child that, you know, money, uh, There's only a limited supply of money. So once we exhaust that, there's no more. So they have to make smart choices. And if they don't make those smart choices, they learn from these mistakes and mistakes are good for learning. Um, because next time, hopefully they make better choices. Cash Kid: Yeah, mistakes are the best teacher. Mom's laughing in the background. On your website, you state for parents to stop feeling insecure when the conversation turns to investing.   Maya Corbic: I'd say this insecurity is what holds a lot of families back. How can they overcome this? So I would say, um, You know, it first is realizing that you want to change and realizing that you have the power to change. A famous investor, Peter Lynch said that anybody who has completed grade four math is capable [00:10:00] of learning how to invest. So I find that very, uh, positive affirmation or news that every, almost every one of us Can learn how to become successful investor with a little bit of effort. Uh, so with that being said, I always suggest that people start with kids books. Um, they are, you know, there's a book behind you that's on investing for kids. There is my book that's right behind me. It's called from piggy banks to stocks, the ultimate guide for a young investor. And that book, when I wrote it, I wrote it originally for children, uh, ages 10 and up. But while I was writing the book, I had some testers and those were families, um, parents with children. Many of these parents are teachers and they were testing the book and giving me feedback to make the book even better. But what actually ended up happening is that these parents were coming back to me and saying, thank you. I finally understand investing because it was really intimidating for [00:11:00] me to understand some of these concepts before. So start with like kids books and then, you know, progress. To something that's a little bit more complex. Um, and then, you know, if you're interested, you know, feel free to explore and find out more about my wealthy kids, uh, investment club, because that's where we teach, um, all the basics of investing and we turn intimidated investors into successful investors. Cash Kid: What do you consider a healthy money mindset in today's investing world? And how has that changed over time?   Maya Corbic:  So, I mean, I think everybody's idea of healthy money mindset is different. I think we all need to decide what ours is. And I think it may also, the healthy money mindset may also change depending on the situation. stages that we go through. So to use myself as an example, being an immigrant and living in government shelters, I was pinching pennies for many, many years. Um, and I, you know, [00:12:00] watched all of my expenses. I budgeted, I was very frugal with my money. Um, while. Simultaneously trying to build my wealth. So, but now that that has changed, you know, like now actually I'm in a different stage of my life where, you know, I have accumulated a significant amount of wealth. I don't necessarily need to be watching every single penny. Like I can loosen up the belt a little bit and enjoy myself, but money mindset is also, Being okay, like for example, for me, uh, it's about being okay with spending money because for so many years I learned to conserve money and not to spend it, um, and just, you know, save, save, save, save, save, and invest. But now that I'm older and I'm in my mid forties, I realize, you know, life is short and money is there for us to enjoy, but enjoy respect. So I'm trying to be okay with enjoying some of my money, even though, you know, every [00:13:00] once in a while there is this creepy feeling that I get, you know, I shouldn't be spending, I shouldn't be doing this. I need you to just like, I just need to save and save and save. But. Just having piles of money and no experiences or quality time with my kids is not the answer either, especially because now my kids are teenagers and soon they will be leaving for college. So I'm just trying to balance it all. So that's my money mindset around money, but somebody else's could be different depending on their circumstances. Cash Kid: Yeah. We love your books you have outlined on your website of recommendations. Do you have a few that you could spotlight for our audience? Yeah. So obviously, I mean, my, my book is my baby and I absolutely love it. So it's called from piggy banks to stocks, the ultimate guide for a young investor. It's available on Amazon and any other, um, major bookstore. If you go online, it's written in a language that a 10 year old can understand. So if you're an adult. Um, you know, you will definitely understand what [00:14:00] it explains and you will like finish that book and you will understand how investing and the stock market works. Um, so the other book that I really like is called grandpa's fortune fables, and it's by my friend, uh, Will Rainey. He's the author. Uh, it's a lovely book. It's, uh, written in a, in a. Like it's like fables, but each fable has, um, a message with it, with regards to money. Cash Kid: Yeah. Is there anything that we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience? I just, you know, want everybody to understand that You know, money may seem intimidating and complex, but once you are committed to changing your generational wealth, um, you can do it. Anybody can do it. It does take some self discipline. Uh, it does take some time. But [00:15:00] as you start learning and as you start doing certain things, it gets easier. So it may seem like a lonely journey, but there are a lot of communities out there, Facebook communities or Instagram communities. Um, You know, I have one where parents are teaching kids about money. So my Instagram is teach.kids.money. Um, you know, where hopefully I can get you inspired to learn and not just only to teach your child, but to learn yourself, uh, because a lot of times some of my followers tell me, well, I'm learning so much from your Instagram page. So that really is the goal is that to inspire adults so that they can teach the kids and we can really have money smart younger generation.   Cash Kid: Mrs. Corbic, we appreciate your time and your expertise. Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid podcast and boosting the financial knowledge of fellow Cash Kids everywhere. As we say on the podcast, anyone can be a Cash Kid, just have to learn how to become one. Cash Kid out.[00:16:00] Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guest. This podcast does not intend to provide personal investment advice. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor, and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
Girls On The Money (And Boys too)!
Mar 18 2024
Girls On The Money (And Boys too)!
Live frugally, save abundantly, invest intelligently. Join us as we interview special guest Mabel Nunez, the founder of Girlsonthemoney.com, where she shares her investing success journey and how she's helping others boost their investing knowledge. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Live frugally, save abundantly, invest intelligently.  That’s our guests’ motto on the show today.    Welcome back to another episode of the Cash Kid Podcast where we continue to build super financial skills. If you aren’t, please be sure to follow us on social media. Just search Cash Kid Podcast or on our website at CashKidPodcast.com.    Cash Kid’s we’ve got a special guest on the show whose story is inspiring and motivating to learn how to invest. Parents, there’s an investing course for you to learn about as well. Listen up! The Cash Kid Podcast is underway.   Cash Kids, we've got a special guest on the show whose story is inspiring and motivating to learn how to invest. Parents, there's an investing course for you to learn about as well. Listen up, the Cash Kid podcast is underway.     So, you got some cash, maybe from an allowance? Or, that money your grandma gave you for your seventh birthday.   Here ya go, sweetie! Woo hoo! Thanks, Grandma! Whatever it is, what are you gonna do with it? Spend it? Hide it away? Or maybe invest it? Let's start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a Cash Kid.    Cash Kid: Joining us today is Mrs. Mabel Nunez. Mabel Nunez is the founder and CEO of Girls on the Money, with over 60, 000 on her Instagram page alone, and 10, 000 members on her Facebook  She's a blogger and investing educator whose mission is to teach everyday people how they can intelligently invest too.  Welcome to the show.   And first off, tell us a little bit about yourself and your story.     Mabel Nunez: Hi, Cash Kid. I'm very excited to be here inviting me and I guess I can say I can start with the fact that I wasn't born in the United States. I was born in an island in the Caribbean called the Dominican Republic and I moved to the States when I was 9 years old and from a very young age.   My parents always taught me. The importance of saving money and, you know, being careful with credit cards, things like that. Um, but it wasn't until I went to college my, my last year of college, my senior year when I discovered the stock market and investing and I. You know, fell in love with it and became obsessed with it.   Um, but, you know, it wasn't something that I learned at home. I learned that when I was already in school, but I'm very grateful and blessed that even though I didn't know how to invest from a young age, I still kind of knew the basics of personal finance from my parents. I grew up in a very, um.  Um, I guess poor household because we were immigrants.   So we had limited resources and things like that. So we had to kind of make do with what we had. And then later on when I, you know, made my own money and started investing, I discovered, you know, this whole new world. So that's kind of how things started off.     Cash Kid: That's really interesting. Tell us about Girls on the Money and why you started this site.    Mabel Nunez: So I started Girls on the Money because when I started to invest, um, And I became obsessed with it, like I said, I noticed that a lot of my friends, my female friends weren't into investing, or they found investing intimidating, or they were, they thought it was too complicated. And most of the people that I will talk to about stocks and funds will be my male friends, my guy friends.   Because they were the ones into it. Um, so I thought, you know, there was a disconnect there. You know, I wondered why weren't more women talking about investing? Why were they so scared of it? So it kind of like, you know, it was like a light bulb moment for me to, okay, I need to create a community or a platform that increases the confidence of women to start investing or, you know, girls.   Even though, like I say on my website, I don't discriminate if like, you know, guys want to learn too. Like that's fine. I welcome them. But my, the majority of the people that I target are female.    Cash Kid: Yeah. I love how on your site you talk about investing being your passion. That's how I started my podcast as it was part of a passion project.   We were assigned that school. Why is investing your passion?     Mabel Nunez: So investing is my passion because, um, I guess it first started with my professor, my college professor that I mentioned before my senior year. He, uh, kind of explained to us how anybody with any income can become a part owner of companies. You know, major companies, you know, like the McDonald's, the apples, the Microsoft.   So I was like, very impressed by the fact that wow, like me, like an average person, you know, with an average salary or whatever at the time that I could become a part owner of this company. So, 1st, you started with that, you know, we just like, just that idea of. You know, it just changed my mindset in terms of what was possible for me as a, you know, a female and an immigrant and somebody with limited resources.   So, then after that, when I started investing and I realized, you know, how successful you can be, if you, you know, if you know how to do it, you know, if you select high quality funds and stocks. When I started to see my money grow and I was, you know, it was even better. You know, it was either a bigger passion for me.   So it kind of, um, it kind of grew from that, like from first, from just the idea of becoming an owner of companies. And then after that is like seeing how we actually work and how you can grow your wealth, you doing so.     Cash Kid:  Yeah,  tell us about the training courses you offer through your site, Girls on the Money.    Mabel Nunez: So I want to, I want, I'm glad you said that because I want to emphasize that the, the, what I teach, um, through my investing bootcamp is investing, specifically, so as you know, Cash Kid, I'm sure you know this, there's a difference between trading and investing, so, you know, day trading and things like that, I don't really get involved in because I feel like, It's like gambling in my opinion.   So, um, what I teach is an investing bootcamp that teaches people how to, you know, select high quality stocks and funds and then just hold on to them for like, you know, 5, 10, 15, 20 years, and then just grow your wealth that way. Um, that's the type of investing that I believe in and that's what I teach my students and clients.   Um, so my class is just 5 weeks and just, we just go over. The basics, everything from, you know, how to open an investment account all the way through how to do your research to select high quality investment. So it's pretty much like long term investing.     Cash Kid: Yeah. What do you feel is the greatest misconception or crux people have or face when it comes to investing?    Mabel Nunez: So I think, uh, there's a lot of misconceptions. I think one of them is that, um, you need a lot of money to do it and, and you don't, especially in this day and age. Like back in the days when I started investing, um, I wanna tell you around 2008, I don't know if you were even born at the time, but back in  . So that back in those days, um, you needed like a minimum amount to start, like either like $5,000, you know, a thousand whatever.   But fast forward, you know, now, now, in this day and age, you don't need any, you know, any minimum to start. You can start with 100 dollars with 50 dollars, whatever you want, whatever you can afford. So, that's 1 thing that people think they need, like, thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to invest and that's not true.   And another thing that I think is a misconception is that investing is difficult that you need a financial advisor to do it, or you need. Somebody from a bank to work you through it and it's really isn't. It's just like a skill that you can learn and it's very, you know, look at you, you're doing it and you're, you know, you're, you're a kid and you're exactly so anybody could invest.   So, that's another big misconception. You don't need a bank, like, you know, a financial advisor. You don't need all this money. You can just be in your house, open an account deposit 50 dollars. And get started.    Cash Kid: Yeah, I totally agree. I have some friends and like, cause like, they, they know about what I do. And they go,  I have like a hundred dollars.   What can I do to invest? And cause like, they're like, when I look at all these companies, they're like a hundred something dollars. And so I don't think I have enough. And I'm like, you can buy partial shares and it's never too early or too little money to start investing. You can always start. I love that.   Mabel Nunez: Absolutely. Also, how has learning to invest changed your life and those of your students? Do you have any examples you can share?     Sure. So my life, I always like to share that my life changed with the amount of time of saving and investing my money consistently to myself, Hey, I want to pursue my own business.   I want to do my own thing. So being able to have investments and savings in the bank, allow me to. You know, launch a business without having to worry about how I'm going to pay my bills or, like,  be desperate for clients or things like that. I didn't want to be in that position. So, investing for me has given me the freedom and flexibility to pursue my dreams.   And that's something that I tell my students, like, hey. You know, even if you don't know for sure where investing is going to take you, it doesn't just have to be retirement. Maybe 1 day you want to travel the world. Maybe 1 day you want to start a business. So you don't know where investing is going to take you.   So, for me, it's just that freedom and for my students, um, I've heard from a lot of my students throughout the years that they've have. Become passionate about investing too, and they started their own consulting businesses. Um, some of them became like financial therapist, which I think is so impressive.   Like, they've been motivated through my courses to, like, you know, either launch their own kind of like businesses in the realm of finance. Or also, like, pursue other other dreams that they had, like, um, like, uh, small businesses or side jobs and things like that. So it has given them also that flexibility to pursue their own independence.   So that's, I think those are the major, major things that have that my students have been able to share with me.     Cash Kid: Yeah, let's talk about kids investing. It's my mission to educate my generation earlier in life the financial skills they need before they go to college and start making money to know what to do with it.   What are your thoughts on kids my age being offered more financial course options and the need for greater financial education?    Mabel Nunez: I agree with it. I think it's so important and I think, you know, I'm so glad that you're doing it. Maybe your parents are teaching you. Maybe you learn it in school, but I think it's so important that the sooner the better, even though, like you said before, it's not too late.   It's never too early to start the sooner you start the better. If you're getting this education from a very young age. You're also being a millionaire, you know, in your 40s or 50s are exponentially higher because, you know, the more time you had ahead of you, the better for your money to grow and compound and I wish more schools made that requirement.   I know there's some loss in the works to make investing or personal finance requirements in schools, but it's not standard in the United States. States. Like I, my own example, like I didn't learn about investing until I was a senior in college. Like imagine that you are like, you know, in elementary school, whatever, and you're already into it.   Like, imagine waiting until you're in college, or even after college, after you have a job, 9 to 5 job to start investing. So, even though it's never too late, like, the sooner you begin, the better. And I think that there should be more resources to have kids get started.     Cash Kid: Yeah, uh, I bought my first stocks over two years ago and I have a list of more I want to buy.   I use an app called Greenlight currently to purchase stocks. What other ways do you know that preteens and teens have in being able to start investing?     Mabel Nunez: So, I wish there was more resources to be honest. Um, Greenlight, I just recently learned about it.  And that is a great platform. I wish there was more to be honest.   I think the only the other option that I've heard of is fidelity. They have a youth account, but I think you have kids from 13 to 17 that qualify for that. So, you know, I guess in teenage years, and besides that, like, custodial accounts that you have to have your parents kind of link to the account that you can open a custodial account.   Like any parent or guardian can open a custodial account for any kid, um, with any broker, like Fidelity, Schwab, Ally, E Trade, whatever it's out there. It's only that the parent's name is going, or the guardian's name is going to be attached to the kid's name until they turn 18 or 21, and then it becomes their account.    Cash Kid: What advice would you give my generation when it comes to learning to invest?    Mabel Nunez: So, I would, I guess the advice I would give, um, you know, start reading, you know, if you're of reading age, start reading books about investing, um, find books that are easy to read, I guess, because some of them are like, overly complicated. So, find books that are easy to read, you know, have your parents, um, you know, kind of guide you if your parents don't know about investing, like, maybe, um.   You know, have them take a class and then teach you or take the class with you. Um, um, shameless plug, like my bootcamp, I have a bootcamp about investing. So, you know, obviously everybody's welcome to check that out. But also there's other classes out there. So if the parent doesn't know about investing, just encourage them to take the class with the kid or on their own and then teach them.   And then, like I said, books, read books, um, maybe listen to podcasts that are kids friendly that also talk about investing. That's also another option. Um, and then I encourage them to explore like companies that they are into that could potentially be good investments. But just just remember that not all companies that we know and love make profitable investments and you have to make that distinction, but always it's fun to explore like, oh, I like I have.   An iPhone, like is Apple a good investment? Or I like to eat at McDonald's. Is McDonald's a good investment? So kind of explore those kind of companies with your child. Keep it in mind, like, okay, is this actually going to make me money? Because that's the whole point of it. But it is fun to like, think about companies like that.    Cash Kid: Yeah, I totally agree. We always like to ask our guests if you have any book recommendations for our audience.     Mabel Nunez: Sure, so, um, 1 of my favorite authors for, like, for investing basics is bitterly Peter Lynch. So he has some really good books. Um, they're simple to read about investing. I'm also an author and investing after I can show you a couple of my books there on Amazon.   They're very easy to read. So this 1 is, um, investing mini lessons for beginners. Um, my name is on there and this is stock analysis. 1 on 1. So, these are very simple, very easy to read books that you can check out, like, any age teenagers, kids, and they just make investing like, you know, is accessible. But they're like, I said, Peter Lynch is also an author that I like that makes investing, you know, kind of simple to understand, but there's some books out there.   Like, when I started investing, they were too complicated. We'll talk about retirement accounts or like, things that I'm like, they went over my head. So you, you know, When you first started, you want to start with books that are easy and simple to read and then you can build from there.     Cash Kid: Yeah. Is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience?    Mabel Nunez: No, I love all your questions. I just want to encourage your audience, either parents or kids alike, that investing is for everyone. Investing doesn't take a lot of money. Investing doesn't have an age limit, especially in this day and age. So just start, like, even if you have just 50, just start. Like, that's the whole point.   I always believe that action breeds confidence. So the minute you take action, you're going to be more confident about starting your investing journey. And just make it fun. I'm serious, like the odds of being a millionaire,  at a, at a very young age are exponentially higher if you start investing young.   So, you know, just get started.    Cash Kid: Yeah. Ms. Nunez, we appreciate your time and your expertise. You can follow Mabel Nunez on Instagram at Girls on the Money and check out her website, girlsonthemoney.com. Or you can check out the investing courses she offers for beginners. Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid Podcast and boosting the financial knowledge of the fellow Cash Kids everywhere.    As we say on the podcast, anyone can be a Cash Kid, just have to learn how to become one. Cash Kid out!   The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guest. This podcast does not intend to provide personal investment advice. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor, and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
Kids Buying Stocks and Investing
Mar 4 2024
Kids Buying Stocks and Investing
Can kids start investing in stocks? Absolutely! The world has changed and kids at a younger age can start investing some of that allowance and birthday cash to start growing their money earlier in life. Learning this financial term as kids can have a huge impact on the financial future of any generation. Tune in to hear how the Cash Kid invests and how to be an informed investor. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Alright, today Cash Kids, we are diving into one of my favorite topics: Investing and stocks. What does investing mean? What’s a way a kid can invest and purchase stocks?   Keep listening. We’ll answer those questions and more coming up. Let’s learn how to grow your money using these essential financial tools. Stay tuned the Cash Kid podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Since launching this podcast almost a year ago now, I get asked a lot about investing, what stocks I like, and where do I invest. My mom says there are some odd conversations that happen in our house at times regarding stocks. I don’t know what she’s talking about. [Mom: What do you mean? I’ll be cooking dinner only to turn around and you and your 9-year-old brother are discussing the gains and losses of a company over the last six months and whether not now is the time to buy. I’m sorry, it may be the new norm in our house… but that’s not the norm in other homes. I mean, how do I write that down in a baby book. Kids discussed Apple stock today. Looks like Johnnie is finally ready to buy that first stock. I mean, come on, it’s a little surreal at times in our house.] Well, I’m working to make it more the norm Mom. If you haven’t figured it out by now episode 28, I like stocks and any way to make money grow without doing much. So, let’s start with the basics. What does the term investing even mean?  Investing is when you spend money with the expectation of achieving a profit. Lots of our parents like to watch these HGTV home renovation shows. What are these folks mostly working towards when they “invest” in buying one of these fixer upper homes? They are looking for that investment (or money spent into buying the home) to fix it up and then make a profit.  In the stock market, when you invest, you are putting money into a company or companies with the expectation you’ll receive a profit in return down the road. I like the way wikipedia describes an investment as a commitment of money to receive more money later. So, one thing to remember as kids, investing is not a short term game. You are putting money in an account to let it sit and grow overtime. My focus on the Cash Kid Podcast is to help get this concept across to my peers that “time” is exactly what’s on our side. Now, how do I invest? I get asked this a lot. I use an app called Greenlight.  Greenlight is a debit card and money app for families, that’s managed by parents. It gives parents tools to manage and monitor their kids spending. You can transfer money straight from a checking account to the kids account on Greenlight. You can pay an allowance this way, assign chores, set savings goals, donate to charity… and my personal favorite… buy stocks. Within the app I can research stocks and ETFs, and mutual funds. I can view charts, buy and sell stocks see how much the stocks are gaining or losing money. The accessibility on this app is amazing. Also some shares can cost hundreds to thousands of dollars and some kids just don’t have that kind of money. So on Greenlight, you can buy partial shares so you always can invest even when you don’t have the money to buy a full stock. I do all my buying and selling within the app.  Since then, I’ve had sometime already to watch the stock prices go up and down and gotten more patient with what I buy and sell. I’m reading books more and doing more research to save up for stocks I want to be able afford stocks I feel will give me a profit from my investment.  My parents for Christmas this past year gifted me a subscription to the Wall Street Journal and Barron’s. I get up some mornings just to read about different stocks and businesses to see what’s happening. Part of being an investor is being informed of what’s going on in the world. Mrs. Wanda McAbee, the Executive Director of the Alabama Council on Economic Education, addressed this in a previous episode in regards to playing the stock market game. Here’s a refresh of what she had to say: Wanda McAbee: “But stock market game is the perfect example of finding a way to help students see the real world connections. So on your portfolio, when you're playing stock market game, and a stock goes up or down, sometimes, you know, you've done research about that stock. But a lot of times, it doesn't matter how much research you've done, what's going on in world events will cause it to go up or down, whether there's a famine, or whether there's a pandemic, or whether there's a war, or whether there's a presidential election. And so we see those real world connections. So it's very important that students gain the knowledge and are equipped with the skills to look at situations to make decisions, to see those real world connections, because that is what's going to impact them in their future as adults and present being productive members of society.” So to invest, you need to take a little time to be informed. You can look at the company's financial reports and see how much money they are making. You can also read news articles to see what people are saying about the company. We’re kids still, so I’m not saying spend hours a day. I spend a few minutes a day browsing the Wall Street Journal and Barron’s articles. It’s helped me for sure. Investing into stocks is an amazing way to help grow your money. I mean look at companies like Amazon. They went up and split in like 30 years. If you invested 30 years ago you would have made a lot of money. Investing in stocks is a good way to make more money. When you buy a stock, you buy a small piece of a company. If the company does well, the value of your stock goes up and you can sell it for more money than you bought it for. But if the company does badly, the value of your stock goes down and you might lose money. Remember, investing is not a guarantee that you will make money. There is always a risk that you will lose money, but you should just hold on to it because if it's a good company it might go back up. And if you're not sure what to do, it's a good idea to talk to a grown-up who knows about investing or even just your parents. I’ve got some future guests in mind who I feel can help us know and understand about buying stocks and investing in future episodes. Right now, we’re trying to lay the ground work for understanding super financial literacy terms to be prepared and take action (some of you already are, which is great!)   Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn.  Thank you for tuning in to this episode. Follow us @cashkidpodcast on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Pinterest and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Cash Kid, out!
Debt Free Millennials
Feb 12 2024
Debt Free Millennials
We have another special guest on the Cash Kid Podcast! Justine Nelson is a book author and founder of DebtFreeMillennials.com. She published a book called "Investing for Kids Activity Book" which has 65 activities on how to teach your kids about money and how to start investing it early. The Cash Kid and Justine are two people trying to change the financial path of their peers. Listen in, the Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Cash Kids, we have another special guest on the Cash Kid Podcast today. Just like I’m trying to reach my generation to build a better financial future, she’s dedicated to changing her financial direction of her. She’s someone who self-taught herself to become a financial expert and wrote a book to help us Cash Kids do the same.  Stay tuned…The Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma. Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Joining us today is Mrs. Justine Nelson. Justine is the founder of Debt Free Millennials and YouTube channel aimed at helping millennials improve their financial situation. She is here to tell us about her financial education book for kids, what she's doing today to help fight for more financial education, getting millennials out of debt, and much more!  Welcome to the show. And first off, tell us a little bit about yourself. Justine Nelson: Thank you so much for having me. This is so awesome. Glad to be on the show. My name is Justine Nelson. I am the founder of Debt Free Millennials and I help millennials crush debt achieve financial confidence that leads to more fun and fewer payments My journey with personal finance actually started when I was a sophomore in college, I was doing my homework at the time when I got a phone call from my mom. And she told me that she and my dad could no longer support me financially through school because she had been laid off from her job. So, I was really panicked on what to do, and trying to figure out how he's going to afford college tuition. So I did what any other college student did at that time, which was to walk down to the student financial aid office and asked to take out more student loans. By the time that I had graduated, I was $35,000 in student loan debt. And I was just making $10 an hour at my very first job, which wasn't a lot of money to cover my student loan payment, and do all of the things that I wanted to do.  After college, I wanted to live in an urban city and a high rise apartment. I wanted to go out for sushi and have lots of fun traveling. And I wasn't sure how I was going to do that, with so much student loan debt. So it was then that I decided that I needed to take financial ownership and pay it off really, really fast. Cash Kid:  We purchased your book “Investing for Kids Activity Book” last year and loved it. We even inspired some of our previous episodes based off the boo.  Tell us why you chose to write this book. Justine Nelson: I chose to write investing for kids the activity book because when I was 10,  12 years old, I didn't have a really good understanding of money. In fact, I thought money was a little mysterious. I had no idea how to earn it, how to keep it. And the only basic teaching principles that I knew from my school was how to write a physical paper check. I don't know if you remember those. But that was the only teaching that I had from school was learning how to write a physical check, and how to cash that in. And really finances so much more than than writing physical checks. And I'm not sure if a lot of people do that anymore. So money is constantly evolving. And I wanted to write this book as a way to guide individuals and kids on how to access money, invest it and grow it. Cash Kid: So tell us about your website and YouTube channel Debt Free Millennials. Why did you start this initiative?  Justine Nelson: Yeah, so going back to my story. I eventually paid off all of my student loan debt in two years, five months on a $37,000 salary. And through that journey, in my experience of being very disciplined with my budget, learning how to invest and really making strides in my career to earn more money, I found more and more of my friends and family were coming to me for financial advice. So, I decided to start a business out of it. And one thing that really attracted me about running my own business was that I could use whatever platform that I wanted, which I love that you're using a podcast. And for me, a YouTube channel was the perfect match for somebody who enjoys being on camera talking about financial topics, and helping others hone their skill set and financial literacy. Cash Kid: What's the biggest obstacle you find Millennials face in getting out of debt and living payment-free? Justine Nelson: I think the biggest obstacle Millennials are facing right now is just not knowing where to start. There are so many different challenges that people face when it comes to their money, that it can be very overwhelming. So just getting that starting point is probably the biggest obstacle that I see. Cash Kid: Do you feel there is a lack of financial education given to kids? And why? Justine Nelson: Yes, I do. Knowing from my personal experience growing up in the public education system. And going back to the physical check, experience, I didn't find that money was accessible in learning about money was accessible from my public education. And so if we were to infuse more personal finance programs, inside of our education curriculum, and I'm sure you have thoughts on this to being in school, and perhaps not getting that personal finance, learning from school, I think having a structured program in place would be so beneficial for kids. Cash Kid: Yeah, so what can be done or are you doing to help move the needle in getting more financial education taught in schools? Justine Nelson: I think the best way would be to come up with a program that can be implemented across our public education system. I think that's kind of the first step to get that into the hands of the kids that desperately need it. In addition to that, I love that there are podcasts like yours and video channels out there that can really teach kids how to save, earn, grow and invest their money. If you can take what we can use inside of schools, in addition to what we can learn outside of school, kids are going to go really far. Cash Kid: Yeah, so what do you think is different for my generation to consider about our financial future than generations before us? Justine Nelson: That's a great question. I think one thing that your generation is going to really have to think about is your college education and how affordable that's going to be so reconsidering your approach to college, looking and actively proactively looking for scholarships, or looking at part time jobs. And more importantly, talking about the costs of college with your family. I saw a lot of my peers go out of state for school, and it ended up costing them three times as much than staying in state for college. So talking about the benefits, and the disadvantages of things like going out of state or staying in state for school is going to be a big conversation that you'll want to have with your family. Cash Kid: What would you say to parents and kids my age on how to set themselves up for great financial future? Justine Nelson: Talk openly about money and talk about money often. H ave a family budget meeting, get involved with those decisions. And then also for parents allow kids to be part of paying for expenses and I don't literally mean having kids pay for their own things, necessarily more. I'll give you an example of a family who gave their kids $40 a piece for the month and said, This is your monthly allotment for your toiletries, so shampoo, all the stuff that they need to take care of themselves. And so they would give their kids the money, and then have them go out and purchase it. And that was the purchase decisions that those kids made was really different, because they knew that they had just a finite resource, just a budgeted amount of money to work with. And it helps them be a part of the family's decision-making process inside of their monthly expenses. So I think that's a really great way to keep the conversations open around money. Cash Kid: Yeah, so what are some ways kids today can start making money and saving it? Justine Nelson: One of the activities that I have inside of the book is called "Money is Everywhere." And basically, the idea is, you already have a skill that you can make money at. So,  whenever I'm thinking about making money and starting to save it, think of the things that you already enjoyed doing. Maybe you really like toddlers and babies, perhaps you can babysit, or maybe you're really good at making things in the kitchen. So, maybe you want to sell baked goods, whatever it is, you can take that skill and turn it into a money-making activities. So I would encourage you to just list out all the things that you enjoy doing. Maybe you really enjoy sports, how could you then become a coach for somebody who may be two or three steps behind you? So, maybe you're really good at shooting free throws? And you want to teach somebody who may be three years younger than you, and have them sign up for free throw lessons and get paid for it? Cash Kid: Yeah, um, one issue I feel my generation faces is we want instant gratification. How can we overcome this mindset, making money learning a skill, investing, and watching it grow is not an instant thing in the real world. Justine Nelson: I think you can have both, I think you can have instant gratification and make money over a long period of time. So one of the other activities that I mentioned in the book is an activity called now or later. And so it's about one kid Nicholas, who spends $5, every single week on candy. And then he savea $0 For a game that he actually wants. When his friend Lucy's still buys candy, but she only spends $1 Every week, and then she saves the rest for the same game, she ends up saving in a shorter amount of time than Nicholas. And she's still got to spend on the fun stuff. So,  I think you absolutely can have both. It's just a matter of being strategic about how you are saving for the things that you really, really want. That may take a little bit more time to get there. And also have fun in the process. You can still spend a little bit of money on the things that you really like do it on a cheaper site, cheaper version, and then also spend and save on the things in the long run. Cash Kid: Yeah, is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience? Justine Nelson: I think the biggest thing for kids when it comes to personal finance is have a sense of curiosity, which I think kids naturally already have. But get curious about money and ask questions. Ask the adults in your life, why they chose the careers that they did. Ask them what's their best piece of financial advice that they would give to a 12-year-old. I think the more curious that you get about those money questions, the more that you're going to have open conversations with adults that are going to be a bit surprised in the beginning that you're asking the questions. But I think it's really a great way to open up the conversations so that you can learn from those around you and learn from the adults who've already been there so that you can make the most out of  So if you would like to learn more, I highly recommend heading over to Amazon and picking out the “Investing for Kids Activity Book.” I think it's a great resource just to get some hands on learning experience. And you don't necessarily have to have money in order to do these activities. And then if you want to dive deeper, you can check out the debt free Millennials YouTube channel, where I talk about personal finance in all different areas to help you level up with your money. Cash Kid: Mrs. Justine, we appreciate your time and your expertise. Thank you for joining us on the cash good podcast and boosting the financial knowledge of fellow cash kids everywhere. Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn.  Thank you for tuning in to this episode. Follow us @cashkidpodcast on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Pinterest and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Cash Kid, out!
Money, Makes Money, Makes Money
Jan 29 2024
Money, Makes Money, Makes Money
Is your money making you more money? If it's not, you are harnessing the power of our next financial term, "compound interest." In this episode, we brought in book author and financial expert Brian Feroldi to explain to us how compound interest works. Not understanding this term could cost us all big bucks down the road. Don't miss out and listen in to find out how money, makes money, makes money in this episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Welcome back Cash Kids!  Alright, I’m going to get serious… listen up. We’ve hit on many financial terms this season already.  But today.  Today’s term is one that many, many, lose lots of money without even realizing it because they don’t understand how it works. If we Cash Kids can understand the power of “compound interest” early in life… guess what, we’ll have more later in life.    And I’ve got a great financial expert and book author here to break it all down for us. Brian Feroldi is the author of the book, “Why Does the Stock Market Go Up?” We loved this book in our house and Brian agreed to come on the show to talk about it.   Stay tuned, please… it’s a matter of big bucks down the road. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   So joining us today is Mr. Brian Feroldi. Brian is a financial educator, podcaster, YouTuber, speaker, writer and author. Mr. Brian’s vision is to spread financial wellness, which is exactly what us Cash Kids need. Welcome to the show Brian. And first off, tell us a little bit about yourself.   Brian Feroldi: Well, thank you for having me. It is a true honor to be here. I myself graduated from college in 2004 and I really put that down as the mark of the start of my money journey. Prior to that, I was taught absolutely nothing about about money growing up, despite graduating with a degree in business. I was taught next to nothing about personal finances.   I was taught next to nothing about the stock market, about compound interest, about the basic principles of spend less than you earn, invest the difference, and grow your wealth. Now, after college, my dad handed me a copy of a very popular book back in 2004 called The Rich Dad Poor Dad, by Robert Kiyosaki. And that book was the first book I ever read that opened my eyes up to the idea that anybody can build wealth.   Anybody can become wealthy in one generation. And importantly, rich people think differently about money than middle class people, and poor people do. And that book opened my eyes to the power of compound interest, introduced me to people like Warren Buffett and Peter Lynch. And that really kickstarted a love affair with everything related to money, personal finance and investing that continues to this day.   So for the last 20 years since I launched that book, I have been doing everything in my power to educate myself and take that information, to educate other people about how to do better with their money.   Cash Kid: All right. That's amazing. So first off, tell us about your book, “Why does the stock market go up?”   Brian Feroldi: So I have been voraciously reading books about money and investing for, again, the last 20 years. One question that I always had about investing in the stock market is that lots of books I read essentially said the same thing. The stock market is the greatest wealth creation machine ever. The stock market grows at a compound annual growth rate of about 10% per year.   And every time the stock market crashes, don't worry, that's the time to buy. The stock market will always come back. I bought that hook line and sinker. However, I didn't understand a fundamental question despite reading those great books. And that was I could see the long term chart that showed the U.S. stock market going up and to the right continually for decade after decade.   But it was never explained to me why that happens. And I was always taught as a kid, what goes up must come down. So every time the stock market crashed, as it did in the year 2000, as it did in the year 2008, as it did in the year 2020, I always thought, Well, that's it. It's crashing. Why on earth would this stock market come back and continue on to a new high?   So I wanted to answer that question fundamentally for myself and really get into the crux of why. Why does the stock market go up? So that was the that was the reason that I wrote the book, is that no such book like that existed.   Cash Kid: Yeah. You cover a lot of topics in your book, but today we want to refocus on the financial term, compound interest. What would be the basic definition for compound interest?   Brian Feroldi: Well, I think Benjamin Franklin has the best definition of compound interest ever. And he said money makes money, and that money makes money. And that money makes money. That's the simplest way to describe compound interest. It's the idea that if you can invest your money and grow it on a percentage basis over time, the interest that you earn on your money earns interest itself, which earns interest itself.   And the net effect of that is that the total amount of wealth that you have grows at a faster and faster rate over time. To take a really simple example, let's pretend we invested $1,000 in the stock market and we earned 10% per year. Well, after one year we'd have $1,000 of our initial principal, plus $100 in gains.   Then if we did that one more year, we would have $1,210 in gains. That extra $10 is interest on our interest from year one. And if you play that forward year after year, the interest that you earn on your interest actually becomes a bigger figure than the initial amount that you invested.   Cash Kid: Yeah. So what do you think people most likely misunderstand about this topic?   Brian Feroldi: Yeah, it's one of the hardest things for our brains to wrap their head around is the long term effects of compound interest. One of the most famous investors of all time is a guy named Warren Buffett. If anybody has ever heard of him, Warren Buffett is one of the ten richest people on Earth. He's worth over $100 billion.   And what makes Warren Buffett so unique? He's the only one of the only people on the rich list of the richest 100 American people in the world that got there primarily through investing. Warren Buffett is 93 years old. And again, he's worth over $100 billion. And what's so fascinating about that is that 99%, 99% of his net worth came after he turned 55.   99%. So when he was 30 years old, he was probably only worth a couple of million dollars. A lot of money in absolute terms, but that's not a hundred plus billion dollars. So humans have a hard, hard time conceptualizing how big numbers can get after you multiply them out over a period of time. I have a really quick riddle to showcase this in principle.   Centuries ago in China, somebody asked the King for a very simple, very simple favor. He said, Take out a chess board. Okay. And on the first and the first checker, I want one grain of rice. And all I want you to do is double the grains of rice for each piece on the chess board. And the king thought about it for a second, and he didn't agree to it because while it started out one grain of rice that doubled the two, that doubled to four, that doubled to eight.   By the time you got to the end, it was more than all of the all of the rice in the entire world could produce combined. So that's really hard for our brains to conceptualize that things get bigger over time when they compound.   Cash Kid: Yeah. So how does the stock market compound?   Brian Feroldi: Yeah. So if you look back historically at the returns of the United States stock market, as represented by something called the S&P 500, the long term returns of the market are about 10% per year, meaning that your money compounds at about 10% per year. How does how does that happen? There's a couple of factors that cause  that 10% compounding to occur.   Thing number one is population growth. Each year the population of the United States and the world grows by about 1 to 2% percent. Not an absolute number like a million or 10 million. On a percentage basis, the population gets 1 to 2% bigger. That means that there are 1 to 2% more consumers each year around the globe that are buying goods and services from companies.   Second, each year, American companies get 1 to 2% more productive. Product productivity is an interesting word. What that basically means is that we can produce the same or more goods or services with fewer and fewer inputs. So think about 40 years ago. Were there any robots or were there any computers in manufacturing? No. But if you look at factories today, here's lots of robots and there's lots of computers. Which makes productivity go up dramatically. So we can create more and more goods with fewer and fewer inputs in any given year. It's the differences are subtle. 1 to 2%. But when you grow that over a period of years, that leads to huge gains in the profit of profits of companies.   The third thing is something called inflation, and that is just when products and services get more expensive on a dollar basis over time, that that's about a1 to 2 percent. And the final one I'll throw out there is global expansion. Each year, hundreds of millions of people go around the world, go from being in the poverty state or being very, very poor to being middle class.   As their wealth increases, they can buy more and more goods from companies around around the world. So that increases the total pie that companies can go after. So each of these things are small, very, very small, almost in imperceptible in any given year. But when you add them up together and when you grow them over a long periods of time, that increases company profits at a compounding rate, which in turn increases the stock market at a compounding rate.   Cash Kid: Couldn’t have said it better myself. Let's bring in another term and that's a dividend. What is a dividend?   Brian Feroldi: Dividends are a wonderful thing to to to learn about. Every year, American businesses or lots of businesses around the world. They make a profit. A profit is simply what revenue you make minus all of your costs of the business. Businesses exist primarily to generate profits. What those companies do with those profits is entirely up to the companies. There's lots of things that they can do with the profits that they make.   They can reinvest in themselves and hire more engineers, build more factories, open up new new geographies. They can pay off debt if they've borrowed money. They can reduce the amount of debt that they have. They can buy other businesses. That's called an acquisition. They can repurchase their own stock from the investors. The final thing they can do is if they have no better use of that money, they can just give it directly, give that cash that profits back to their shareholders.   And when they do that, that is that is called a dividend. And you can think of a dividend. Kind of like the way you think of the interest rate on a bank account. You put your money into a bank and the bank pays you 5% interest. Well, if you have $100 in there, you're going to make $5 per year in an interest income with a stock instead of calling it the interest rate.   We call it the dividend yield, and that is the cash payments that you get for every every hundred dollars that you have invested in a stock. So a dividend is very similar to interest from a bank.   Cash Kid: Yeah. Now, how do dividends play a role in compound interest?   Brian Feroldi: If you look back historically, dividends have played a huge role in how the stock market returns that 10% per year. Those other factors that I listed before, such as inflation, productivity, population growth and premiumization around the world, those account for about 6 to 8% of the 10% that investors earn on their money over time. Dividends have historically accounted for about 2 to 4% of that total return. So dividends are actually a really critical component of a way that investors can get that 10% compounded return as the cash comes in through owning dividend paying stocks. Those dividends are reinvested back into the company to buy more shares. So dividends are a really, really important way to generate compounding wealth in the stock market.   Cash Kid: In your book you said like I forgot the guy's name, but it's like he invested 400. Was it per month?   Brian Feroldi: Absolutely. I have a really simple example of a guy named Aaron. It's a fictional character in my book who invests $100 per week into the stock market. And you're right. The difference between if Aaron took the money out, if he spent the dividends that he had versus reinvested the dividends. It doesn't seem like that much in any given year, just like 2 to 3% spending versus reinvesting.   But over a long period of time, it actually leads to millions, millions of extra dollars in your bank account.   Cash Kid: Yeah. What should kids my age understand about the impact of compound interest in early investing?   Brian Feroldi: Yeah. I am a huge fan of teaching. Teaching these kind of concepts in school. I would highly suggest that every kid out there go to the internet and type in compound interest calculator and do a simple calculation of what $100 invested in the stock market $100 a month could become if you invested it for ten years, for 20 years.   For 30 years, for 40 years and more. A lot of people's eyes really open up when you showcase that a small amount of money invested consistently into an asset that compounds can literally become millions of dollars in their lifetime. And the best way to take advantage of that is to start shen you are young. T he younger you can start the, the more time you have on your side and the bigger your wealth can grow.   So I wish that I could teach every kid in America or every kid in the world the power of compound interest.   Cash Kid: Yeah, you say on the front cover of your book that this book has everything you should have been taught about investing in school, but weren’t. So what's your thought on the access of the amount of financial education or information provided right now?   Brian Feroldi: When I was a kid. I was in school primarily in the eighties and nineties. Financial literacy or teaching these basic concepts was essentially nonexistent. And to be fair, it was never part of the school's criteria. So a lot of the teachers out there themselves weren't taught these basics financial concepts. I think it should absolutely be mandatory. Mandatory that you should learn about basics of personal finance, basics of investing before you graduate from high school.   And I think you should be taught these basic principles starting in elementary school. They should be reinforced in middle school, and they should be really reinforced in high school and throughout college. Now, the good news there is that there is progress on this front. Many U.S. states now require that people take personal finance lessons before they graduate from college in my home state of Rhode Island.   This bill, this was actually introduced just a few years ago that high school students must take a personal finance class before they can graduate. Dozens of other states have also followed suit. I would love it if it was instituted at the federal level, but until that happens, it's every parent's responsibility to make sure their kids are taught sound investing and money principles before they head off on their own.   Cash Kid: Yeah, I mean, like, that's why we're here right now doing this interview, just to be able to reach more kids and teach them about compound interest. Is there anything we haven't asked you that you want to share with our audience?   Brian Feroldi: Well, I think that you've done a fabulous job reading the book, researching and answering questions. And I think that what you are doing with the Cash Kids podcast is really, really fantastic. So I would say you did an excellent job covering the covering the basics, and I would really encourage people to go back and listen to your other podcasts too, so they can educate themselves.   Cash Kid: And maybe last and a quick answer. What's at stake by not understanding compound interest?   Brian Feroldi: The answer there is unfortunately, your financial future. If you can understand the power of compound compound interest, you can in one generation go from being born poor or middle class to ending as ending as a rich a rich person. And like it or not, money affects every aspect of our lives. It affects where you live. It affects the education you can get.   It affects whether you can go on vacation. What kind of life experiences you have, what kind of automobile you can have if you can have health insurance or not. So money is the fuel that enables you to have a great life. So money impacts your life whether you want it to or not. And if you can learn about compound interest in harness is power.   You can make money. You can have all the money you will ever need in your life.   Cash Kid: Yeah. Mr. Brian Feroldi we appreciate your time and expertise. Please check out his book called “Why Does the Stock Market Go Up?” on Amazon. And Brian has created a website called https://stockinvesting.school/. And if you go there, he has a free five-day email-based course that you can enroll in. And over the course of five days he’ll teach you a lot of the basics that are covered in his book for free.   Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out!
Pay Taxes, What!?!
Jan 15 2024
Pay Taxes, What!?!
We gotta pay taxes, what!?! Many kids are shocked to learn just how much is taken out of that first paycheck. In this episode, we break down the basics of what are taxes, why we pay them, and what's with all those "W" forms. Oh, and who is Uncle Sam? Let's talk taxes in this episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript There are only two certains in life…. death and taxes. - Said everyone as I’m told it’s a pretty old joke.  What are taxes, who pays them, why are there so many W forms involved, and why do we pay taxes?  Oh, and who is Uncle Sam? Well, you’re about to find out in this episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma. Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Okay. So let's talk about taxes. I hear this topic causes a lot of anxiety in adults. I'm hoping we can educate my generation about it earlier to have a better understanding of it and maybe develop less anxiety.  Joining us today is Joe Proffitt with Dark Horse CPAs. Mr. Proffitt, welcome to the show. Joe Proffitt: Hey, great to be here, Cash Kid. I very much appreciate the time. And I agree if we can start talking about taxes younger, maybe I wouldn't have freaked out about them when I got to be an adult as well. Cash Kid: Yeah. So welcome. And first off, just tell us a little bit about yourself. Joe Proffitt: Sure. I'm a CPA based out of Little Rock, Arkansas. I work with clients all over the country, from small business owners to individuals that don't necessarily own a business but need help with their tax planning and filing. And the main thing for people to do what I do. Basically, the U.S. tax system is complicated and sometimes you need a little bit of help and things get to be more than you can handle on your own. Cash Kid: Yeah. So what does Dark Horse CPAs do for its clients? Joe Proffitt: Great question. So Dark Horse specializes in serving small business owners. Specifically, we provide tax and accounting services ranging from basic bookkeeping to what we refer to as CFO engagements. We essentially help business owners compile their financial information and put it into a format that allows them to know where they're at financially to help them with projections as needed, or on the side of the tax work we do, compliance work with the basic business tax filings or just essentially try to help make sense of the really complicated tax structure we have here in the U.S.. Cash Kid: All right. Let's talk about taxes, Mr. Proffitt. We’ll, start simple. What is the basic reason why we pay taxes? Joe Proffitt: Great question again. So taxes provide money to the government so that they can provide services for we the people. In an ideal world, taxes provide a range of services, whether it be assistance for individuals needing a little bit more help provides money for constructed roadways. Essentially, taxes are the way the government gets money from its citizens so that it can continue to function as the government. Cash Kid: What all do we pay taxes on? Joe Proffitt: Pretty much anything that you're going to spend any time you spend money or receive money, you're probably going to be subject to some sort of tax. So you get sales tax on groceries, cars. You have various tax for major purchases like a home purchase, you pay property taxes, or when you do own various pieces of personal property. So the major categories of taxes across the U.S. are going to be your income tax, your property taxes and your sales are what we refer to as excise taxes. And the sales and excise is based on things that you actually go out to purchase and are based on the usage that way. Cash Kid: In episode one of of season 2, a financial teacher at a local high school stated a lot of his students were shocked when they got their first pay check to see how much they paid in taxes, leaving them with a lot less than what they thought they would take home. Can we break down the different taxes in what we pay for and why we pay them from our paycheck? Joe Proffitt: Absolutely. And I remember it hurt my feelings the first paycheck I got and when I was a kid, seeing how much they hold out. And so when you receive any anyone that goes out and works for an employer and receives a paycheck, they're going to have your federal income tax withholding, state where it actually occurs depending on where you live. And then you're going to have additional taxes that we refer to as FICA. And what FICA is, that’s FICA, is the Social Security and Medicare tax withholdings. Now, the federal and state can vary, but FICA  is based on set percentages and it goes into the Social Security system and the larger Medicare system. It essentially helps provide Social Security income and Medicare coverage for the elderly and people that are in that retirement phase. Cash Kid: Ok, we pay taxes buying everyday things and in our paychecks. So why do we have to file our taxes every year in April? Joe Proffitt: I ask myself that same question all the time. Now with if you have a straightforward tax situation, say you receive a W-2, you just work one job, you receive a W-2, then a lot of the time, the way tax withholding works, it's an estimate of what your actual tax is going to be for the year because we we don't all pay a flat tax based on the income that we have. So throughout the year, the withholdings from our checks for the income tax piece is a guess at what our year in income is going to be and what tax bracket we go in. Basically, the more income you make in the U.S., the higher your tax rate as the income level goes up. So we file tax returns at the end of the year to confirm exactly what our taxable income was for the year, to take advantage of any tax credits that are on there to report any income that wasn't otherwise reported, say, if you're self-employed or if you're operating, say, a lawn mowing business, if you're wanting to make some extra money on there. And that's where we get to either true up to pay in what we owe additionally to the IRS or request a refund if we overpaid throughout the year. The point at which we get even with the IRS or the state that we're filing in. Cash Kid: And maybe Mr. Proffitt just if you can explain quickly, what's a W-2? Joe Proffitt: Right. Gotcha. And just to clarify, a W-2 is a year in tax form that goes out by the end of January every year for anyone that receives a paycheck from an employer. So if you go and work in part time job or if you're a full time employee of a company, you're going to receive a W-2. So anyone that receives a regular paycheck with tax withholdings, you'll receive a W-2 at year end, and that's what you use to file your taxes. Cash Kid: Yeah. So are there tax benefits that teens and college students can take advantage of that will allow us to get a bigger refund? Joe Proffitt: That is a really good question. So with teen college students there, if they are providing their primary support, there are various educational tax credits, two specific ones to pay attention to are the American Opportunity Tax Credit and the lifetime learner tax credit, and whether they apply for those on their individual return, if they file and support themselves or if they're still being supported by their parents and listed as a dependent, they're that's a great resource for those people as well, whether, again, whether they're still on their parent's taxes or if they're independent and filing on their own. For teenagers, the the majority of the time, the best thing for teens is to just make sure that you have sufficient withholding. The standard deduction when you're a dependent is lower than if you're an adult earning the same wages. But most of the time, what I see with kids that are working part time jobs, you'll usually have good withholding that you end up getting a refund. So honestly, the best thing to do is just make sure that you fill out. Actually, we need to take a step back for a moment. Whenever you first go to work for an employer, you're going to fill out a form. A W-4, and I know I'm talking about a lot of W forms is something that whenever you go to work for an employer, they're going to hand this to you and expect you to know how to fill it out. And what it tells them is how much to withhold on your taxes. And for the vast majority of teens that are out there working a job, you're going to want to put single and zero on this W-4 form because that makes sure that you have the most held out of your check that you can and really that's the main trick to it is just making sure that you have sufficient withholding. Cash Kid: Do tax laws and regulations change a lot, making it harder for the everyday person to keep up with the rules? Joe Proffitt: So year after year we'll have a few minor changes here and there. And every so often we have a major overhaul of the tax system. There was one that occurred back in the 1980s, well before, well before your time, but there was an additional big tax law change back in 2017. Most of the time it's pretty business as usual other than specific changes with various different tax pieces. And that's where people like me come in because my career is based on staying up to date on any tax law changes. And that's why that's why the accounting profession exist in the first place, at least from public to to help people keep up with tax law changes and make sure they're taking advantage of everything that is allowed to them. Cash Kid: What advice do you give your clients when dealing with taxes? Joe Proffitt: Preparedness, Proactive planning is the best. Is one of the best resources that you have. Just finding an accountant that you feel comfortable communicating with and having an issue that I see often working for various clients is that they come through. We file their tax return, but there's not very much we can do once we're outside of the year. So honestly, just proactive planning during the year is one of the best, best benefits that or the best advantage that anyone can take when it comes to tax compliance. Making sure that you don't pay more than you actually are required to pay in your taxes. Cash Kid: Yeah. I don’t want to pay more than required for sure.  Is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience? Joe Proffitt: Something to bear in mind whenever  for your audience. I mean, anyone listening here is going to have a more entrepreneurial spirit, and I admire that very much, especially at such a young age. I will say that there is a difference in going to work the way you're paid, in the way you pay taxes when you receive a paycheck, meaning that you'll get a W-2 at the end of the year, your taxes are withheld from your check during the year. Now, if you go out and are operating as an independent business, basically like a like a small business owner would where you're not receiving a paycheck, then you may have to make tax payments throughout the year on your own. And if you get to that point, then definitely you'll want to either reach out to your parent or guardian, someone that's at least got access to the resources that you'll need or potentially even reach out to an accountant just in order to get a little bit of additional information. Because there's one one specific tax when you're self-employed, it's called self-employment tax. And it can be a big, nasty surprise for people when you go from receiving a paycheck to working for yourself. And so that would just be one of the main pieces, I would say, for anyone that's wanting to strike out to business on their own. Yeah, I'm sure. Cash Kid: I was going to say is an example like let's say a kid runs a lawn mowing business. Would they need to keep like a book of their expenses and jobs? Joe Proffitt: So you'll need to keep track of the income that you're receiving from your various customers. And you'll also, especially want to keep track of any expenses that you have. So we're talking gas purchases, any additional equipment that you buy, any repairs that you have to pay for, because these are the things that reduce what your taxable income is. If, let's say, a child or a you know, let's call it business owner, call it what it is, they make $10,000 in a year and that's their gross revenue, what they received from their customers. You'll want to have a listing of all of those expenses that you paid. Otherwise you're going to end up paying tax on the full amount of that 10,000 that you made, even though that's not the money that you kept, You had $3,000 in expenses. So really, you should only pay tax on $7,000 and great resources are out there for keeping track of your expenses. To start off with a smaller business like that, I recommend spreadsheets. Whether you're you prefer Excel, Google Docs, whatever your preferred spreadsheet platform, it will just make life much easier for you. And when it comes to expenses, you want to list who you paid, when you paid them, what it was for and how much it was. And that's the kind of information that you'll send to your account accountant a year end, and then they can put together your business filing. Cash Kid: Mr. Joe Proffitt, we appreciate your time and your expertise. Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid Podcast and advancing the financial knowledge of the kids everywhere. Joe Proffitt: Absolutely has been a great pleasure and let me know any time you want me to come back. (music) Now back to the question on who is Uncle Sam? Have you heard this before? Uncle Sam looks like an older man with white hair and beard, in a top hat, pointing at you. Just Google it Cash Kids. It’s a personification of the United States of America or more specifically, the internal revenue service IRS. During the War of 1812, the United States Army received supplies from a variety of organizations and individuals, one of which was Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York. He labeled his barrels of beef with “U.S.” to indicate U.S. government property, but soldiers referred to the “U.S.” as Uncle Sam. So when you hear someone say, “Uncle Sam is gonna get you eventually.” They very well could be talking about tax season, and how the government or “Uncle Sam” will get those tax dollars from you one way or another. Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
What to do with that Christmas Cash.
Dec 25 2023
What to do with that Christmas Cash.
Got some cash for Christmas and wondering how to spend it. We've got seven ideas on how to stretch that money, make it grow, and set yourself up for a better financial future in this special edition episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Happy Holidays! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Cash Kid Christmas Script   What’s up Cash Kids?     Maybe where you are it’s snowing outside, or maybe it’s 85 degrees and sunny…  But wherever you are, I bet there are holiday decorations nearby and you and your family and friends are getting ready for overeating and celebrations!   Here at the Cash Kid Podcast we are wrapping up a great year and getting ready for a well deserved holiday break…   After all “it’s the most wonderful time of the year,” right?   But I’m here to tell you today why it’s the “Most wonderful time of the year to make some good financial decisions.” Ideas on what to do with that Christmas cash, coming up.   INTRO   Welcome back to the Cash Kid Podcast special episode edition. This is our first episode that’s also in video format. Listen where you like, but you can catch the full video episode on your YouTube page. Just search Cash Kid Podcast.   So, like I said, it’s the most wonderful time of the year to make some good financial decisions.  Don’t believe me…  Just listen up as we revisit some important topics from other 2023 Cash Kid Podcast episodes.   Idea number 1: Treat yourself… but don’t blow it   If you get cash for Christmas, take time to consider your options and don’t blow it all right away.  Sure, it’s ok to spend some of it - treat yourself.  Be sure to go back and listen to episode 7 titled “Needs, Loves, Likes, Wants” for a refresh on spending that cash wisely.   Idea number 2: Take advantage of sales   There are plenty of deals before Christmas… but after Christmas is a great time to snag the things you've been eyeing on sale. Whether it's a new pair of shoes, a fancy kitchen gadget, or the latest tech toy, there are plenty of deals to be had. One tip for finding the best prices is to search multiple sites. Don't just settle for the first deal you come across. Check out different retailers and compare prices to make sure you're getting the best possible discount.     Idea number 3: Coupon Codes Another way to save even more money is to use promo codes. These codes can often be found with a quick Google search. Simply type in the name of the retailer you're shopping with and "promo code" to see if there are any discounts available. Sometimes you'll find a code for free shipping, a percentage off your purchase, or even a free gift with your purchase. It's a small extra step that can make a big difference in your overall savings.   Idea number 4: Open a savings account   If you haven’t opened a savings account yet, consider now a great time to do it. Some offer up to 5% in interest a month.  Let’s listen to a clip from the checking versus savings episode.     Cash Kid: At what age can someone open a savings account? Amy Greer: So the good news is parents can open one for you at any age. You can open one at birth and they can start contributing to it and grandparents can start contributing to it for the for a child individually to open one on their own. It actually goes in accordance with state laws and federal laws. That is typically around 18. Cash Kid: What would be a reason to start a savings account as a kid? Amy Greer: Well, there's so many reasons to choose from for that. Like I mentioned earlier, it can help you learn responsibility by setting aside some percentage of all the money that you make. If you just start the habit of moving some of that into your savings every time you get money, whether it's paid for a service you provided or paid for a good you made or an allowance, just set aside some of that in a savings. And there's also many big, big future events that you can start saving for and help your parents out like cars and college and maybe one day weddings. Many things that you can start saving for in the future. It's never too early to start saving. Idea number 5: Invest it!   There are several different ways kids today can start investing. I use an app called Greenlight to purchase stocks I want. Take some of that cash and make a commitment to watch it grow this coming year.    Here’s an example. A year ago, I purchased a stock in Apple, Amazon, and Tesla. These are companies I spent time researching and felt would bring me a return on my investment. Well, check it out a year later. Amazon is up 81%. These stocks have all grown and so has my money. So check out an app like Greenlight. We definitely plan to discuss more options like this for kids in future episodes so stay tuned.   Idea number 6: Give Back   Think of a way you can spend some of that cash to do something for someone else. The saying it’s more blessed to give than receive comes with great benefits to you and the recipient. Maybe it’s to your church, a local charity, a dog shelter. There are so many options. Take a little and think of how to bless someone else.   Idea number 7: Set Financial Goals As we approach the end of the year, it's natural to begin reflecting on the past 12 months and start thinking about what we want to achieve in the coming year. It's important to make our goals realistic and achievable, while also challenging ourselves.To help us stay on track, we can create a budget and track our progress towards our goals.  We can also seek out resources and tools to help us learn more about personal finance and make informed decisions about our money. Like continuing to listen to the Cash Kid podcast. But maybe set a goal to find a way to make some extra cash. Invest in learning a new skill that you can then turn into a small side hustle for yourself. Maybe teens can set a goal to save up for that first car or college. These are just some ideas to get your brains rolling but the possibilities are practically endless. By assessing our current situation, setting realistic goals, and tracking our progress, we can make meaningful changes in our financial lives. So as we look ahead to the new year, let's consider making financial resolutions and taking steps towards a brighter financial future. Before we end the last episode of 2023, I want to take a moment to thank you all for being part of the Cash Kid Podcast this year.    Look for a new episode of Cash Kid on January 15, 2024.   Happy Holidays Cash Kid Out!!!
Investing in Cryptocurrency- Part 2
Dec 11 2023
Investing in Cryptocurrency- Part 2
What's up with cryptocurrency? Do you know enough about this new-age digital currency that never rests? Find out more about why my generation needs to understand this financial concept in part 2 of "What is Cryptocurrency?" on the Cash Kid podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript “I really wish I would have started investing in the stock market at your age and learning the stock market, because I didn't start learning about it until I was just graduated from college.”   Welcome back to episode 9 season 2 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Whether you're listening from Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, the cashkidpodcast website or wherever you like to listen from, we’re glad you are here!    Today, we are jumping right back into part 2 of our discussion on Cryptocurrency. If you haven’t already, be sure and listen to part 1 first.    There is so much confusion and unknown on this topic, we decided to split it into two episodes. Did you know that cryptocurrency trading is open 24/7 365 days a year? The market never closes! What’s the future of cryptocurrency? What is Bitcoin? And what should my generation know about investing in this new-age currency? Those answers and more coming up. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Joining us again today is Mr. Grant Newell who is an entrepreneur and a financial professional. He is the co-founder and CEO of Abundant X Inc, Amana X royalties and Abundant X Investments, LLC.   As the CEO of AbundantX, Grant Newell has been at the forefront of optimizing accounting efficiencies, devising cutting-edge tax strategies, exploring innovative investing, and promoting financial education.   Let’s jump back into our discussion from the previous episode.   The Cash Kid Okay, so where do you see cryptocurrency going in the future?   Grant Newall  So the government has actually already started creating their own digital currency. And so what I think will happen in the future with cryptocurrency, especially because each country has seen how successful Bitcoin and Ethereum have been in the market. And usually how it works is the government's want to get in on the action. They don't want to they don't want to miss out. And so my thoughts on it is that the governments will come in, and each country will have their own cryptocurrency. Kind of like how, you know, each country has their own physical currency, currently, and I think we'll end up venturing into that it'll be a little bit easier to transact with our own currencies. And as a result, I think it will have some downward effect on the larger currencies currently. Unless the government comes in and says, Hey, we're we're going to join with Bitcoin or join with Ethereum in which could happen as well. They can adopt those cryptocurrencies as their main currency for the country. So there's kind of two options, I think the governments have figured out that, that it's not going away that cryptocurrency is going to be a thing moving forward. And it's just going to be about whether they want to create their own or they want to adopt one of the mainstream ones as you know, their form of currency for the country.   The Cash Kid So now a lot of people hear the term Bitcoin a lot, but what exactly is Bitcoin?   Grant Newall So it is one form of cryptocurrency that, like I kind of explained to earlier, it's decentralized. So it is not regulated by anybody. There is no one authority that rules over it. It is all on the blockchain, which is just kind of a fancy way of if you think of Legos, they stack on top of each other and they get stronger and stronger as If you build on top of them, and once you plug in a Lego on top of another one, it locks it in. And that's what bitcoin does is every time somebody trades, buys a Bitcoin and sells a Bitcoin, it creates a new block. And they just stack on top of each other, since there's no central authority for it.   The Cash Kid  Are there other cryptos besides Bitcoin?   Grant Newall Yes, yeah, so there's lots and lots of cryptocurrencies. You know it for some people, they'll try and find the next Bitcoin or next Ethereum. I try and stay away from that. It's, it's a little bit of a guessing game at that point. So I try and stick to investing in the main two, which is Ethereum and Bitcoin, just because trying to guess the winner is really difficult. And you'll lose more than you win in that game. So I try and trade the charts for the large ones and stay away from, you know, all the little ones that anybody can make.      The Cash Kid  Yeah, so what are you investing in? Exactly? When you invest in a Bitcoin or type of currency? Like, what are you trying to look for in that company?   Grant Newall  Um, so when it comes to currencies, I'm really, you know, it's different from the stock market, because in the stock market, you're investing in a company and the products that they make, and the way that they run their business, you're investing in those sorts of things, when it comes to currencies, you're really investing in the worth of that currency against anything else. And so with Bitcoin and Ethereum, I strictly look at charts, and where it's at on the four-hour and daily charts. And then if it's at a low area, I'll buy if it's at a high area, I'll sell. And, you know, some of it also has to do with news as well, some people like Elon Musk, if he says he's buying Bitcoin, it's really it's usually going to go up. If he says he's selling it, it's usually going to go down. So keeping an eye out on the news, and what main people are saying, and then paying attention to the charts, because like I was saying, it's a little bit different than the stock market. So you can't really base it off of the actual coin, themselves. You're basing it off of the value on the charts.   The Cash Kid  Yeah, I can remember a friend or an adult telling me this. But there was a soccer player and he was supposed to, ah, after the game, he is supposed to represent Pepsi. And he goes, no drink water. And after that, everybody thought that since he was a really famous soccer player, everybody thought that the company wasn't going to do well. And so they started selling, and then everything just started going down. They eventually regained. But that just kind of reminded me when we talked about how news affects things, and you can definitely do stuff like that. So, um, what do you feel my generation needs to know about cryptocurrency and how it's going to affect our financial investing options.   Grant Newall  So I think the best thing that your generation can do is just keep an eye on the news like you were saying and continue to learn charts. But I think the biggest thing that, you know, your generation can learn is, you know, from an early early age, learning charts, and why they move the way they do. Because if you can put those two together, investing really becomes a game of patience, waiting for certain things to get to certain places. And then those moves that happen, you'll catch them. And so for you guys, I really wish I would have started investing in the stock market at your age and learning the stock market, because I didn't start learning about it until I was just graduated from college. So I'm definitely excited that you are learning about this so early on, and you will have a tremendous, tremendous advantage later on in life. Because the great part about trading is every year, every month, every week, you become better at trading and investing. And so the extra years that you guys get to have in learning about this so early is going to be such an incredible advantage that you'll have later on in life that you guys are really going to be thankful for.   The Cash Kid  So, Mr. Newell, we appreciate your time and expertise. Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid Podcast in boosting the financial knowledge of fellow cash kids everywhere.   Grant Newall  Thank you for having me.   Wow, I learned so much from Grant. It’s great to have experts like him to help us understand terms like this.    Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
What is Cryptocurrency - Part 1
Dec 4 2023
What is Cryptocurrency - Part 1
What is cryptocurrency? Most are baffled on this topic. But I feel my generation certainly needs to understand this new-age currency and what it means for our investing future. So, join us in this interview with a cryptocurrency expert to break it down in a two-part episode series. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript SPEAKERS Grant Newall, The Cash Kid Welcome back to episode 8 season 2 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Whether you're listening from Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, the Cash Kid Podcast website, or wherever you like to listen from, we’re glad you are here!  Our focus this season continues to be on building super financial literacy skills, and today, we have a special guest who is going to break down a term that… well…I’ve found most people don’t want to discuss because they don’t really know or understand much about it. It’s known as cryptocurrency. Listen up and learn more in today’s episode. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!    Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Joining us today is Mr. Grant Newell who is an entrepreneur and a financial professional. He is the co founder and CEO of Abundant X Inc, Amana X royalties and Abundant X Investments, LLC.    First off, we'd like to welcome him to the show.   Grant Newall  Thank you for having me. I want to, first of all, commend you for your tremendous success and for having this podcast for even teaching kids and helping kids understand the nuances and things of finance because it's definitely needed in this world.   The Cash Kid Yeah, definitely. I agree. So, um, first off, how about you tell us a little bit about yourself?   Grant Newall  Yeah, so I started with finance very young like yourself. I started by bartering at garage sales. And it grew from there. I always wanted to be an entrepreneur, and build businesses. And it started from a young age, I was mowing lawns, and doing construction work for my neighbor's, gosh, probably since the age of like, 10 years old. And so I learned how to advertise. I learned how to work hard. And most of all, I learned how to manage finance. Then from there, I went and played college football at Oklahoma State. And once my football career was over, I had no idea what I was going to do with my life. And so I found myself being a lifeguard at the local pool. And I had tore my shoulder playing football. And when I got done, I had to have it repaired. And in doing so, I couldn't be a lifeguard, I couldn't really save people's lives while I had a, an arm in a sling. So that led me to a company called the Joseph group. And the owner of it was a Harvard MBA, he graduated with honors and was incredible with finances, and he took me under his wings, and taught me the nuances in the finance business. And so from there, it's grown into today having a tax and accounting firm, along with an investment firm that we do trading and investments with.   The Cash Kid So um, let's jump right into it. What is the basic definition of cryptocurrency?   Grant Newall So cryptocurrency is basically decentralized finance. And what that means is it is finance that's not controlled by one person. And really, the easiest way to understand it is when you look at $1, the $1 Bill $5 Bill, whatever. And you're holding that in your hand. T hat currency there is controlled by the US government and the central bank. With cryptocurrency, there is nobody that rules over the cryptocurrency. It's all in the blockchain. And so it creates a path for people to have finances that aren't regulated that aren't controlled by one single government or authority.   The Cash Kid  So why did this need arise for cryptocurrency?   Grant Newall  Well, a lot of it arose when you know, you go to these other countries and for us, we have US dollars. And some of these countries, they wouldn't accept the US dollar , because when they take in that dollar, they then have to go to their bank, and they have to give it to their bank, their bank has to convert it into their currency that they have in their country. And then they can use it.    So there's this long process. And so the need arose for there to be a currency that would go across the world, no matter where you're at, no matter where you live, one Bitcoin or one ethereum is worth that. You don't have to convert it into anything else.   The Cash Kid  So what do you think confuses people most about when understanding the value or even the idea of cryptocurrency?   Grant Newall  I think probably the confusion comes to not knowing what it exactly is and really how to use it. And that's part of the the hardest part about it is that it's done all online. There's no you can't go buy or you can't go get a physical Bitcoin or any cryptocurrency, you can't get them physically. So I think for a lot of people, it's difficult to understand because they can't actually touch it and actually feel it in their hands.   The Cash Kid  So how do people purchase cryptocurrency or buy a Bitcoin or something like that?   Grant Newall Yeah, so really, the main ways to do it are through certain apps. The main ones would be coin base, crypto.com is another one. Binance.com is another one. There's a couple of mainstream ones, but there's lots of different ways that you can buy them. And they're usually through apps. And what you would do is you would download that app, you'd create a profile, you have to enter in you know, your social security, your name, birthdate, all of that sort of stuff, they run a couple of checks on you verify your personal info, and then you're able to deposit money into that account.    So you deposit your own money into there, and then you're able to buy bitcoins or ethereum or any other cryptocurrency that you choose.   The Cash Kid Are there different types of cryptocurrencies?   Grant Newall Yes, so that's the another thing about cryptocurrency is basically, anybody can create their own cryptocurrency if they wanted to. Now how much value goes on that cryptocurrency is up to the market. And there are, I would say, two main ones that most people would know and are invested in, and that is Bitcoin and ethereum.    The Cash Kid  I think a lot of us have probably heard of Bitcoin and ethereum. So is it safe to invest in cryptocurrency?   Grant Newall So that's a, that's a good question. It's, I wouldn't necessarily say any sort of investing is safe. But with cryptocurrency, one thing that people have to be careful of is that it is an industry that is unregulated. And what unregulated means is that the government doesn't come in and say, “Hey, we want to make sure that there's no scammers. There's no people getting hurt with this, there's no there's no ill intentions with these currencies.” And so you have to be careful because the government can come in and shut certain things down. I was a victim of this early on in my investing career, I had invested in something called Bitconnect, which is a form of lending for cryptocurrency. And the government came in and shut it down. And so all of my money was gone. Now, do I think that's going to happen with Bitcoin and ethereum? No. But there's still the unknown of what different governments our government are going to do when it comes to cryptocurrencies. So there is some unknown, and you can make a lot of money and lose a lot of money with unknowns. So I wouldn't necessarily say it's safe. But if you're worried about losing all of your money, Bitcoin and ethereum is what I would stick to.     Thanks Grant. We’re going to stop our discussion there for today. But join us next week for part 2 of our discussion on cryptocurrency with Grant where we talk about the future of cryptocurrency and why you should consider it an investment option.    Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
Working for Greater Financial Education
Nov 27 2023
Working for Greater Financial Education
Should financial education be a graduation requirement? One organization is working to spread access to greater financial education for all students. Find out what they are doing, what age can kids start learning the stock market, and what opportunities await those who learn to invest early. Those topics and more are in this episode of the Cash Kid Podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript SPEAKERS The Cash Kid, Wanda McAbee Welcome back to episode 7 season 2 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Whether your listening from Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, the cashkidpodcast website or wherever you like to listen from, we’re glad you are here!    Our focus this season continues to be on building super financial literacy skills, and today, we have a special guest who works every day to do that for kids across the entire state of Alabama. There are organizations across the US who are seeking funding and fighting for legislative measures to be taken to make financial education an educational requirement because of the impact it can have on our economy.    You don’t want to miss out on what she has to say. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Who is advocating for us kids to have access to better financial education at a younger age? How can real world events impact our investments and why should we understand that? At what age can kids start learning about the stock market?   Joining me today is Mrs. Wanda McAbee who is the Executive Director of the Alabama Council on Economic Education.   Mrs. McAbee is a little like me. She was introduced to the stock market game which we discussed in season 1 episode 8. This game ignited her passion to have more financial education provided for not just her students but the entire state of Alabama. And that’s what she works to do now. Advocate for more financial education programs and requirements to set students up for greater financial success.   The Cash Kid  Welcome. And first off, tell us a little bit about yourself.   Wanda McAbee Well, first of all, thank you so much for this invitation. I think I want to start by saying that I love learning, okay? I've loved learning my whole life. I spent over 47 years as a either a classroom teacher or an administrator in public schools in Alabama. And now it is my distinct honor to continue serving the area of education. As Executive Director of the Alabama Council on Economic Education. My journey began in stock market game being used in my classroom. It just sort of ignited a passion in me. So I'm just excited to continue this learning process.   The Cash Kid  So, what does the Alabama Council on Economic Education do?   Wanda McAbee Okay, well, we are a nonprofit organization. And our purpose and mission is to provide economic and financial education in Alabama, by providing professional development and curriculum resources to teachers throughout the state, at no cost to them. And then through this work that we do with teachers, we have the opportunity to impact students. So that's our mission, working with teachers to help them equip their students to have a better financial future and an understanding of the decision-making process to become good informed  citizens in our society.   The Cash Kid  Why was an organization like this formed? And how does it help support schools?   Wanda McAbee Okay, so this organization was founded in 1969. And we're very thankful for the group of individuals that saw a need in the state of Alabama to have another way that students and teachers could be impacted. We keep up with our data on a two year timeframe. And so over the past two years, we've impacted over 179,000 students, and we have had an involvement with teachers or students in over 70%, of the school systems in Alabama. So our goal is to make it 100%. We want every school system, public and private involved.    The Cash Kid  So what impact do you feel these programs have had on school systems in our state?   Wanda McAbee  We are continuing to offer a variety of programs. I mentioned that we do professional development for teachers. A lot of teachers who are like me, when I first started stock market game, I had no investment background. In fact, if you said the word economics, I probably would roll my eyes and say, Oh, how boring is that? I don't want to do that. But stock market game. As a teacher, I became totally engaged. And I realized that I had missed out on 15 years of compound interest. Oh my gosh. So I learned that myself. And so through that impact on me personally, it gave me this passion to continue to do this with the council. So the teachers that I work with when you're asked about the impact, they generally even today, tell me the same thing because they don't have the background coming up in schools that gave them and equipped them with this investment, education, knowledge and financial education knowledge. So so that's our goal. We want to reach out to all those teachers and help them help their students be more successful.   The Cash Kid Yeah, so how important is financial literacy and learning economic skills?   Wanda McAbee  So we could talk about that for a long, long time. How important is it? Well, in terms of life skills, stock market game, I know this is how you became involved in it. But stock market game is the perfect example of finding a way to help students see the real world connections. So on your portfolio, when you're playing stock market game, and a stock goes up or down, sometimes, you know, you've done research about that stock. But a lot of times, it doesn't matter how much research you've done, what's going on in world events will cause it to go up or down, whether there's a famine, or whether there's a pandemic, or whether there's a war, or whether there's a presidential election. And so we see those real world connections. So it's very important that students gain the knowledge and are equipped with the skills to look at situations to make decisions, to see those real world connections, because that is what's going to impact them in their future as adults and present being productive members of society. So we think that that's, that's one of the biggest reasons is just, it helps not just in the financial future, but just learning how to make those informed decision making skills. Economics is life. When you stop and you think about the decisions that you make, everything that you make, comes back to economics, it comes back to scarcity. Scarcity is the driving force for everything. We can't have everything we want, we have to make decisions. And we have to learn how to make informed decisions. That knowledge is power. So programs like stock market game, and we have several other programs that we offer, throughout the state. Those are designed to help students learn to see decisions, make decisions, make informed decisions, and see how that impacts their life.   The Cash Kid   Yeah. So do you feel there's been a rise in demand for education like this, and why?   Wanda McAbee  In 2014, in Alabama, there was a push for making a financial education course, a required part of the graduation in the state of Alabama. At that time, in 2014, only five states required a graduation course in financial education to be part of the curriculum, only five states. Now, I just looked up these numbers today, there are 30 states that now have that as a graduation requirement. And I think that shows the importance that people are now seeing throughout the state and through advocacy groups and seeing that it's just it helps better everyone, when we have that kind of knowledge.    The Cash Kid Yeah. So can you tell us about any initiatives that you are working on or goals of the Alabama Council on Economic Education?   Wanda McAbee Ah, yes, ah, we continue to have goals to implement all of our programs. In addition to stock market game, we offer InvestWrite , which is an essay competition, that's part of stock market game that's optional for students to participate in. We love academic competitions. We think that we're competitive society, and its students get more involved when there's a competition. And we give really good prizes, too. But we also offer the Economics Challenge, and the National Personal Finance Challenge for students in grades six through 12. And those are online competitions, everything we do is at no cost to the teachers or the students. So we have these two online competitions, where students form teams, and they take online test, and the top teams at the high school level, are invited to a state championship. Those state champions then represent Alabama at the national competition. And I'm very pleased to report that at a national competition this past year, we had a second place in the nation from Alabama, in the personal finance challenge. So, we're really excited about that. And then we have another competition Rockonomix. And in Rockonomix, students take a song that they like, and they rewrite the lyrics, and do their own video. And the lyrics have to do with economics and personal finance. And we have some really, really cute, clever things that our students have submitted. And that's for grades four through 12. So we know that there are a lot of different ways that our students in Alabama can show their abilities and can show how smart they are, and how creative they are.    The Cash Kid Is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience?   Wanda McAbee Um, well, one thing I do just want to point out, it's never too early. Okay. Because I get this question asked several times from teachers. They'll say, Oh, well, ninth grade, sometimes our ninth graders that concept might be too hard or whatever. And I have a different view of that. I think it is never too early to start learning about financial education than the national standards for learning about stocks. The benchmark is at fourth grade, okay. It's never too early, we have programs that we offer for our elementary teachers that help them weave financial education into their curriculum starting in kindergarten. So it's never too early. We, that's something I really want to emphasize. And if we have teachers, or parents or anyone that's listening to this podcast, we just encourage you to reach out to us, you can go to our website, econ alabama.org. And we have many, many resources, and we have ways that we can connect you.  But I would just say, I want to just emphasize again, how important it is to make this a requirement in the home and in the schools, and keep this emphasis going and your efforts. let me commend you, your efforts. And what you're doing is helping to get this message across, and ultimately will help to empower your peers to have a more successful financial future.So congratulations to you!   Thank you Mrs. McAbee for all you are doing to fight for our generation’s financial sucess.   This episode was a little longer than most but whether you are a fellow cash kid, parent, teacher, educator, or grandparent listening, I felt it worthy to hear it’s never too early. If there’s not enough education options in your schools, get involved and seek to have more added.  Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing. To learn more visit Alabama Council on Economic Education: https://www.econalabama.org/
A Loan Is Free Money, Right?
Nov 20 2023
A Loan Is Free Money, Right?
A loan is free money, right? This week we dive into learning three more financial terms we "Cash Kids" need to learn to further our super financial skills. Loan, debt, and interest. How are they all tied together? How much debt are Americans in? Plus, a Cash Kid blooper to laugh about. That and more coming up in this episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript That’s Warren Buffett during a conference in 2009, stating there’s even a problem with this generation when it comes to financial literacy terms. It’s my goal, that’s not said about my generation! So, welcome back Cash Kid Podcast listeners! You’re listening to episode 6 already of season 2 where we are focused on building super financial literacy skills this season. What about debt and interest rates?  And how much debt are Americans in?  You’ll find out. Stay tuned. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway. Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma. Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Listen, let’s be honest. When kids ask their parents for money and they give it to us…. In the back of our minds, we have no intentions of paying that money back, right? I mean. We used it. And for the majority of our lives up until we start making our own money, this is how it works. But in the real world, when someone loans you money… they definitely, definitely, expect you to pay them back. This brings us to our first term this episode. What is a loan? (ding) A loan is basically an amount of money that a bank or lender has allowed you to borrow for a certain amount of time and pay back with interest.  One example is a mortgage. This is the type of loan your parents probably have to pay for your house. Most mortgages are set at a 30 year loan. So say you purchase a house and take out a loan (mortgage) and have 30 years to pay a certain amount each month to pay back the bank that loaned you the money to buy the house.   When you take out a loan, you incur what our next financial term is called… debt. Debt is money that you owe to either a person or a business.  Here are some stats.  American households carry a total of $17.1 trillion in debt as of the second quarter of 2023, and the average household debt is $101,915 as of the end of 2022. Rising debt can mean less economic opportunities, plus slows economic growth. Now, in the mortgage example, your parents owe the bank a certain amount every month for the next 30 years. So let’s say you also need a car. So, you take out an auto loan. Auto loans are usually set around 5 years. It’s the same principle. You now have a new loan and more debt basically. You have more money you owe back to a financial institution over a period of time. Last episode, we talked about your credit score and what things can affect your credit score. The amount of loans you have open and the amount of debt you have, can impact your credit score. Now, if you make your loan payments each month on time, then you are being financially smart and paying down your debt. But if you don’t, you can incur additional fees and your interest rates could go up, thus increasing your debt. I think it’s clear which direction you want to be headed in, right? So, is a loan free money? Nope. Those days of just taking your parents cash and never giving it back were fun, but the real world is knocking… and they want that cash back. (music) Now, how does someone get a loan? Well, you  have to show you have good credit which we discussed in previous episodes. You have to show you are responsible financially so the banks will in good faith trust you to pay the money back. How many of you have had a friend or sibling borrow some money, and in the back of your mind… you knew… that money is gone? Lenders will look at your past financial history, your credit record and see if you are eligible to be offered a loan based on your habits and behaviors financially. They won’t think of you as a friend though and just let it go… this is business, they want to feel confident you can repay. Which means they’ll also want to know how much money you make. They want to see that you don’t have five credit cards, two car loans, a mortgage, and now need another loan but don’t make enough to even pay off those other, there’s that word again, debts.  So, be aware. Taking out a loan needs to have a purpose in mind… and a game plan to pay it back to eliminate your debt. And let’s just touch on interest here for a minute. With any loan, not only is it not free money, it’s money borrowed with a fee attached. See, when you borrow money, you are charged a specific interest rate (like a fee) for the bank allowing you to borrow that money in the first place. So let’s say you have a $1,000 dollar loan and you have ten months to pay it back. The loan agreement states you must pay a balance of $100 each month plus 5% interest. That means you’ll pay $102.31 cents each month. By the time you pay it off, you will have paid the $1,000 back….plus…. an extra $23.06 in interest. I could calculate bigger numbers… but they scare even me! So, loan, debt, and interest. They’re all tied together you see. Our goal here with the Cash Kid Podcast is to be aware of these terms early in life so we can make smart informed financial decisions to keep us out of bad debt, and paying more in the long run. Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
What is a Credit Score?
Nov 13 2023
What is a Credit Score?
What’s a credit score? Do you know? When do you get one and how is it calculated? And why does your score even matter? Well, turns out, it does. Find out those answers in more in season 2 episode 5 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript What’s a Credit Score?   Welcome back to another episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Whether you're listening from Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, the Cash Kid Podcast website, or wherever you like to listen from, we’re glad you are here!    This is episode 5 of season 2 where each week we dive into different financial terms we need to know to become cash kids. This week, what is a credit score? Do you have a credit score? If so, how is it calculated? What’s a good score? And can you just ask people what their score is? Those answers and more coming up. Plus, another book review this week. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!    Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Last week we discussed the difference between debit and credit. We stated that credit is money that’s borrowed from a lender in return that you agree to pay it back, usually with interest. But how well you pay it back, how often, and how much credit you have all can feed into your credit score. Now, for kids my age, we don’t have credit scores yet. But, let’s compare it to an adult’s grade point average or GPA. At my age, we worry about our GPA by the grades we get in school. It’s based on how well we perform in our classes. A credit score is kind of similar. A credit score is a prediction of your credit behavior. Like, how likely are you to actually pay back a loan on time. Let’s say you turn 18 and open a simple credit card with a $5,000 limit. If you spend it all but then forget to pay it back, or at least make the minimum payment each month… guess what… your credit score will take a hit and start to go down. Credit scores range from 300 to 850.  I tried figuring out why “these” numbers. I mean why not start at zero? But I haven’t found a clear answer yet.  So, just remember the score ranges from 300 to 850. The higher the number the better. A score below 700 is considered “fair” credit… we’ll equate that to getting a “C” average. Anything around 700 to 800 is good,... say an A-B average and over 800 is considered exceptional or A+.  In 2022, the average FICO Score in the U.S. reached 714. There are actually several sites where you can check your credit score at any time. But how can you achieve those higher numbers? Many times this is a mystery to most. I’ve learned most adults don’t even know what their score is. And why does it even matter what your score is? We’ll discuss this more coming up, after this book review from my Mom. (music) This week we are spotlighting an activity book. The title is “Investing for Kids Activity Book” by Justine Nelson. It has over 65 activities about savings, investing, and growing your money that kids can easily work through to get a concept of how money works and how they can work to make it. Each workbook activity takes less than 5 minutes. The book can be found on sites like Amazon and Wal-Mart for less than ten dollars. Stocking stuffer for sure that will pay dividends!    (music) Thanks Mom! Alright. So, why does your credit score matter? It matters because companies use your credit score to decide on whether to offer you money to borrow to make purchases like a house, or a car.  Like our $5,000 dollar credit card example earlier where he forgot to pay it back or make payments on time. Say that same person went to try and buy a car and needs a loan to do it, which would be another line of credit. The car dealership will look at his credit score and say, “Hey, your score isn’t great because you show as being behind in paying back your debt.” So, no car for you! There are actually several factors that impact your credit score. Here are some. Your bill-paying history is one. Like in our example, how well do you pay your bills? Another factor is how much current unpaid debt you have. So how many lines of credit do you have open and how much do you still owe on each of those? Also, the number and type of loan accounts you have. We’ll just say most adults have a car loan and a mortage (your house payment). If you have those two but you pay the balances each month, on time, then this type of practice can increase your score. Another factor is how much of your available credit are you using. So if you have a $5,000 dollar credit card and it’s maxed out that month but you pay it back within the month, that can help your score. But if you don’t, and let’s say you have three cards all maxed out… that isn’t going to help. Trust me… we could go on and on about the ins and outs of a credit score. At this age, the moral of the story is this. Building credit is good. It’s a way to show you are financially responsible. But getting lines of credit with the intention of not having the income to pay it back and pay it off, well, that’s gonna affect your score… it’s the same as not listening in class and studying and it affects your GPA. And one more thing to touch on about how having a lower score can hurt you. See, when you open a line of credit, you are given an interest rate. This is basically a fee you pay for borrowing the money. The higher your credit score the lower the interest rate, which means the less amount you will be charged by the lender as a fee for borrowing money. But the lower your score, well the higher the interest rate. Here’s a quick example.  Let’s say you have a good score and get a nice low-interest rate of 5% on a $5,000 loan that you need to pay back within 5 years. You’ll pay a total of $661 in interest.   But if you have bad credit then on the same $5,000 loan let’s say you are given a 10% interest rate and you’ll pay $1,347 in interest. See the difference?  Same loan amount, but because you are trusted less, you get charged more. Build trust, build a better score… it matters. And I asked the question, can you ask someone what their credit score is?  Dad: “No, that’s not something people do.”  Was the answer I was given. So, it’s mostly between you and the lenders. So don’t go around asking people their scores. But, discuss this with your parents and have an open conversation about how you want help to build a good score one day. Listening to The Cash Kid Podcast, we can guarantee will help. Cash Kids, we have more terms, discussions, and skills to learn. Thank you for tuning in to this episode. If you have a question, please, reach out to me at cashkidspodcast@gmail.com and I’ll answer it in a future episode. You can also reach out via our website at cashkidpodcast.com.  Follow us on Instagram and wherever you are listening, leave a review! We need your help reaching a larger audience and building the financial skills of the next generation. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.
Debit vs Credit
Nov 6 2023
Debit vs Credit
Debit versus credit. What's the difference? How fast is credit card use growing? How can it get you in trouble, fast? And what are banks doing to prepare for our generation's needs in how we want to handle money or forms of it? Answers to those questions and more coming up in season 2 episode 4 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Debit vs Credit Hey Cash Kids! Ready to test your financial literacy skills even further today? We are in season 2, episode 4 of the Cash Kid Podcast where we are working to build super financial skills. If you haven’t already, go back and listen to past episodes as each one builds on the next.  Today, debit vs. credit. Do you really know the difference between them? How fast is credit card use growing? Can it get you in trouble? And what are banks doing to meet our generation's financial needs? Those answers and more are coming up! The Cash Kid Podcast is underway. Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Joining me again today is Mrs. Amy Greer with Cadence Bank.  She is the Director of Digital Transformation where she works to make sure customers have a great experience online or in banks apps, including all types of money movement that we will talk about today. Thank you, Mrs. Greer, for joining us on the show again. Let’s get into it. Cash Kid: So what is your definition for debit? Amy Greer: Well, a debit card is actually a tool that's connected to a checking account that allows you to use that at various places, such as stores and any merchants is what they are called that accept card payments, which is pretty much everywhere nowadays. But it is a way to to pay for for goods or services, and it comes directly out of your checking account. So you have to have the funds in the account in order for it to process. It's not money that you're borrowing, and so it's not credit, which I know we'll talk about in a little bit, but it's actually linking to the cash that you have sitting in your checking account. And so it's just a quick and easy way to pay for things. And it also helps guarantee that you have proof of purchase and kind of like a digital receipt. And because then you can go back and look and see what you spent where in the super helpful in that way. Cash Kid: So to clarify, debit is cash you actually have in your checking account. Right.  Amy Greer: That's right. It's your money in your account. And debit is just the tool that you use to get to to pull the money out, to pay a person. Cash Kid: How did people pay for things before debit cards from their checking account? Amy Greer: So lots of checks. Lots of lots of recording checks in the check register, like I mentioned. So people would pay with checks and cash was a lot of cash. And there's been a huge decrease in just the amount of cash that the government even makes now, paper cash. Because of because of the digital currency and things that are taking over. Cash Kid: What brought about the need for debit? Amy Greer: The need for debit, I think, really began out as just the fact that cash was getting harder to keep up with. Checks were people were trying to be more environmentally friendly and not write as much paper. And so this concept of the debit system, that electronic money movement kind of was birthed. And it's really again, it's back to it gets money places faster and safer and there's a trail for you to track it. Cash Kid: How do people mostly use debit as a form of payment? Amy Greer: Most people use debit as a form of payment at what we call point of sale, which that means you're at a store or another name you'll you'll learn over the years as a merchant. And so really, as you as you are buying something in the gas station or you're buying something, you know, at a concession stand or at an event, that's the point of sale purchase is when you tap your card or insert your card or swipe your debit card.  There's all different options these days. That's where most of the transactions occur. It's not as readily available to use your debit card to pay another individual. That's where some of the digital forms of payment come in, where you can send money digitally to different accounts like Venmo and things that we've talked about.   (music transition)   Cash Kid: All right. Let's switch to credit. I feel probably, most people hear this term more than debit. What is your definition of credit? Amy Greer: So credit in the simplest sense is really an account that's established. But it is borrowed money from the bank. It's a borrowed line of credit. It is basically the bank or the the card provider saying to you. You have shown me that you can do a good job with responsibility financially. So I'm approving you to have $5,000. Let's just say as an example, you can use it all at once or you can use it a little bit at a time, but you have to pay me back a little. You have to pay back at least a certain amount in the minimum amount each month, and you have to pay it on time. And therefore you can avoid fees and the interest rate if you pay it off entirely in the interest that they banks and card services charge you would never would never factor in because you would have a zero balance. So it is just essentially a permission to use X number of funds. And then you have to show responsible behavior prior to even being able to get one. But this core difference between credit and debit is that credit is not your money. It is borrowed money of the institution, whereas a debit card is your actual money. It is actually in your checking account. It is tied to your real balance.  Cash Kid: How do people use credit cards today? Amy Greer: Credit cards is a fast, fast growing industry, and it is where I think the large majority of transactions are occurring on credit cards. Credit cards, it's increase from, let's say, you know, probably five years ago, I think it was like at the 20% rate was the number of payments made with credit card. And today it's it's like in the thirties if if I recall from the last time I looked. And a lot of that is related to how the different credit card companies and banks present their services and give you things that come as a bonus with it. So you can earn points or you can earn free airline flights, or you can have some you can set up and choose donations. So they've made it very attractive for people to use credit cards.   Cash Kid: What age can you get a credit card and where can you get one. Amy Greer: So you can get a credit card on your own technically  at age 18, however, you need to have had a history of proving that you have had good behavior in terms of paying off bills. So to do that, you would have had to have have get a high school job, show that you have income, get a cell phone bill or something, some sort of bill, something of yours in your name before you're 18 and pay it back regularly. Have a savings account, show that you saved. All of that are the behaviors that are going to help you build credit. But really, you can't apply for one until age 18.   Cash Kid: What's a good way for parents to help their children with their first credit card? Amy Greer: A great way to help them would be to teach them how important it is to use it responsibly, because it really, really if it's not done responsibly, a credit card can actually harm your financial well-being more than helping it. So it's it's a good way to to build credit so that you can get future rewards from it. So even if you have a $5,000 limit, if you know there's no way in the next year you're going to make $5,000 or get $5,000 in any capacity, then you don't need to spend anywhere near that. And so learning just some of those tricks about how to use it responsibly, paying it off on time, the minimum and don't spend more than you can pay back , then you'll be well on your way towards making the most out of it. Cash Kid: How can a credit get you in trouble? Amy Greer: Credit can definitely get you in trouble easier than you would think. There are some some situations where you're asked to pay a bill or something, and if it's late, even one time, depending on the service provider, they can turn you into a credit bureau, I mean, to a credit agency, and that can ding what we call ding your score. And so you have to have a you everything you do is building a profile for you for your future. So credit can get you in trouble. If you're not responsible in making payments, then you can not be approved for future credit cards or loans. When you go to buy a house or you can be given a very high rate. So if you if you damage your credit, then you're going to go in kind of a different bracket, if you will, for what rates you're eligible for. And you're typically not going to get the most competitive rates. You're going to get rates that are very high. So that'll end up costing you a lot more money just to borrow money for a credit card.   Cash Kid: How do you feel banks are preparing themselves educational wise or app wise to accommodate the upcoming generation… that's going to deal more with just digital currency and kind of the way they want to handle money? Amy Greer: Yes, that is a great question. Banks have really upped their efforts on financial education and financial literacy. I can assure you all the conversations at banks are heavily weighted on building the technology in the financial education for the future. So building those things are going to be absolutely critical to attract anyone in the younger demographic to want to come and bank with us. So there is a lot of energy, a lot of investment going into prioritizing all of the digital solutions on top of that financial education. So the combo of those two is what is what really adds value. Cash Kid: Is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience? Amy Greer: I think we've covered it all. These are great questions and it's a really, really important topic for teens and you really understand the importance of being responsible early on so it can help them in the future.    Thank you Mrs. Greer for furthering our financial skills.  Cash Kids, thank you so much for listening. We’re going to dive into the topic of credit next week and tackle a topic most adults don’t understand. Your credit score. What is that? Tune in next week. Got a financial question for us to answer? Just email me at: cashkidpodcast@gmail.com or leave a message on our website at cashkidpodcast.com. Also please leave a review wherever you are listening from, and follow us on Instagram. We appreciate you. Cash Kid Out!
Checking vs Savings
Oct 30 2023
Checking vs Savings
Checking versus a savings account. Do you really know the difference? How many people are still actually writing checks these days? When should you open these accounts? We answer and discuss these questions and more in season 2 episode 3 of the Cash Kid Podcast. Join us as we dig deeper into building super financial literacy skills in this episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Checking vs Savings Account What’s up Cash Kids! First, every week we are watching the number of new listeners and we can’t thank you enough for joining us on this journey. Right now, you are listening to season 2 episode 3 of the Cash Kid Podcast where we are focused on learning super financial skills. So, let’s get started!   First a riddle for  you.  I love riddles. What kind of book can make money? The answer,coming up. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Checking vs a Savings Account. Do you really know the difference? When do you need one, or both? And are writing checks the ancient past. Hahaha! Joining me today to break it all down is Mrs. Amy Greer with Cadence Bank.  She is the Director of Digital Transformation where she works to make sure customers have a great experience online or in banking apps, including all types of money movement that we will talk about today. Thank you, Mrs. Greer, for joining us on the show. Amy Greer: You're welcome. I'm so glad to be here. Cash Kid: First off, tell us a little bit about yourself. Amy Greer: So, my name is Amy Greer, and I have been in banking for over 18 years. And I was with Region’s Bank for a while. And now I've just started a new journey with Cadence Bank here in Birmingham and have always been very passionate about financial literacy and in making sure that the banks can provide tools and technology to help users learn how to manage their financial life. Cash Kid: All right. We've brought you on to help educate our audience about the difference between a checking and a savings account. Let's start with checking. Tell us basically what that is. Please. Amy Greer: So a checking account is basically a place for you to store your money at at a bank that can be opened for you by a parent. Really, at any age, they can set it up and they can be joint on your account. But until you're 18. Typically in most states you can't have one on your own.  So if you have if you earn money from chores or different projects you worked on or jobs as you get older and you start to get jobs, anything like that that you earn or even money that you get as a gift for Christmas or various birthdays. It can all be deposited here in the bank. And the good thing at any bank and a checking account is that it's safe there and it's guaranteed. You can add on other tools to it, like a debit card that allows you to use money in it, like a mobile app that allows you to have access to the funds that sit to the funds that sit in your checking account.   You can then leverage a lot of different ways to send money to people, whether it's through other payment apps like Venmo or PayPal that we all know so much about. Or within the bank account, you can move money out of your checking account for that. You can also use it to buy goods. So there's something that that you need, whether it's food your parents have given you money or you've saved your allowance or something beyond just food it’s something you’ve worked for and you’re ready to purchase it. It’s many different purposes and it’s just a great practice to start learning early on in life. Cash Kid: What would be some reasons for a kid to open a checking account?   Amy Greer: Well, I think the main reason would be to really get you introduced to learning how to manage money. Until you can have your own account and really see that money that you got, that you earned or that you got as a gift is sitting right here in this bank in this account and it’s safe. And if I go use some of that money for something fun or something, I need to do something I want to donate. Then you can see what it does to the balance and it triggers it starts in your brain early at an early and important age for you to start realizing what you have left, what you've earned. And the concept of sharing money when needed. And it just helps. It helps develop responsible behaviors. Cash Kid: Are there fees to consider with a checking account? Amy Greer: Yes, there can be fees. Actually, that is a very important thing to look into when you're choosing between different checking accounts. So some checking accounts require you to have a certain balance, which means you have to have maybe, let's say, at least $100 in the checking account. And if you go below that, then there will be a fee. And that's really because it costs the banks money to hold the checking account. However, most of the time, and especially for kids for minor accounts or those that you're on with, with a parent, there are many things that you can do. Many ways you can avoid a fee. Sometimes it's as simple is just enrolling in online statements and then the bank will what they will do, what they call waive the fee. So they'll just pretend that you don't get it that month or again, if you make a certain number of transactions, then the fee can be waived. So there are a lot of different options and opportunities out there for you to choose from.   Cash Kid: Just curious, my mom talks about when she got a checking account. She was taught to actually write down each transaction in her checkbook. I understand that that's ancient now mostly, but would you agree and talk how people balance a checking account now? Amy Greer: Yes, actually, I do. While I do agree that it's an older practice, I will tell you, I know personally it is a very valuable one. And strangely enough, I used to enjoy it very much. I loved keeping a perfect check register. I would. I was color coordinated, and I loved writing everything down. And I miss those days. I now, like most people, rely on the digital platforms to write down where they've spent money. I’m sorry to track where they spent money in lieu of writing it down. So when you log into online banking now for people that don't keep a checking, a check register, when you log into your mobile or online banking, you can see a history of everything that's come in and out of your account. So that's primarily what people use today to track their funds, money in and money out. But there's also the occasional need for writing a check. And so when you do that, you still, there's nothing there's nothing wrong with writing it down and actually keeping a check register, because it can certainly also be helpful for you in the future. Cash Kid: And maybe a follow up to the ancient practice question. How do people still write physical checks? Amy Greer: Well, that, I will say, is decreasing by the day. So even the the pandemic, the COVID pandemic in 2020 kind of started even a more more of a downward trend in usage of checks than we were seeing before. And that was because people weren't around to write checks and hand checks to each other. We were quarantined for a while and then, you know, everyone had those a little bit of angst and nervousness about passing and sharing cash and checks. So with that, I think most Americans I read that 57% have not written a check in the past month. And there was an even larger an even more material number than that that had not written one in in a year. So I think it just about now, it's an average of about 4% of all of our transactions in America. Only 4% are written checks.   (music break)   Cash Kid: All right. Let's turn to the savings account now. What is a savings account? Amy Greer: So a savings account is also something a tool that is offered by banks or financial institutions that give you a safe place to put your funds for that you might be saving for any particular reason. You name it. It could be set aside some money for an emergency fund or to reach certain goals, trips, sports equipment, things such as that.   But it's a way that you can know instead of keeping cash under your mattress or cash in one of your drawer hoping your siblings don’t find it like mine do here sometimes. It is a good place to store your money to save. And the good news is, is that you get paid interest. So the banks, the way banks operate is they actually depend on having your money in savings accounts and even in checking account. So a certain degree, because they are able to then use that to give out loans to other people. So it's still your money and it's still safe. But. But because of that, because it's so valuable to a banking system, you get paid interest. So it's a really good way to watch your money just grow automatically. Cash Kid: At what age can someone open a savings account? Amy Greer: So the good news is parents can open one for you at any age. You can open one at birth and they can start contributing to it and grandparents can start contributing to it for the for a child individually to open one on their own. It actually goes in accordance with state laws and federal laws. That is typically around 18. Cash Kid: What would be a reason to start a savings account as a kid? Amy Greer: Well, there's so many reasons to choose from for that. Like I mentioned earlier, it can help you learn responsibility by setting aside some percentage of all the money that you make. If you just start the habit of moving some of that into your savings every time you get money, whether it's paid for a service you provided or paid for a good you made or an allowance, just set aside some of that in a savings. And there's also many big, big future events that you can start saving for and help your parents out like cars and college and maybe one day weddings. Many things that you can start saving for in the future. It's never too early to start saving. Cash Kid: Is there anything we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience? Amy Greer: And everyone just remember even the quarters and pennies and all of that you have laying around all add up. So start collecting it and get out and get your account and get your your behaviors for spending and saving better under control so that you'll be best set for the future. (music starts) Thank you Mrs. Greer. That’s exactly what we are seeking to achieve with this podcast. Setting ourselves up young for financial success.    Cash Kids, we are just getting started with diving deeper into building our super financial literacy skills. Be sure to tune in next week where we discuss if you really know the difference between debit and credit. Do you? We’ll see. Oh, and to answer our riddle.  What kind of book can make money? The answer is a checkbook. But I called that an ancient practice today… hahaha…. so not so much anymore. Remember to visit our website at cashkidpodcast.com, leave a review wherever you are listening from, and follow us on Instagram. Cash Kid Out!
Money, Money, Money
Oct 23 2023
Money, Money, Money
Money. You don’t have to love it, but you do need it. In this episode, we dig into our first super financial literacy term and discuss money. Where did it come from? What can it do for you? And is paper cash, nearing an end!? We’ll discuss this and more in season 2 episode 2 of the Ca$h Kid Podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Money, Money, Money Money isn’t the most important thing in life, but it’s reasonably close to oxygen on the “gotta have it” scale. ~Zig Ziglar Welcome back to another episode of the Cash Kid Podcast. Whether you're listening from Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, the cashkidpodcast website, or wherever you like to listen from, we’re glad you are here!  In this episode, we start to dive into some financial literacy terms we need to know and understand. And you guessed it, today we’re talking about money. You don’t have to love it… but you do need it. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway!  Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma. Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. Money. Why do we have it? Where did it come from? And are the days of holding paper cash nearing an end?  Well, money or forms of it have been around for thousands of years. Money serves to measure the value of an item. Back before coins or cash, people bartered or exchanged, goods and services. For instance, maybe one villager would trade his one goat for five chickens. The value of the one goat was considered worth five chickens.  Over time, the methods used to pay for a product or service developed into the use of coins. Precious metals like gold and silver started to be used in trading. Lydians in 600 BC were the first known to make coins from these precious metals. The first paper money known was introduced in China around 800AD. But it wasn’t until the 17th Century that Western civilizations turned to the use of paper money. Today, central banks print banknotes or paper money and use special security features to prevent them from being easily fake.  Money now has taken the form of everything from the U.S. dollar to cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Thanks to the creation of modern-day money, buying, selling, and trading is easier than it’s ever been. But while here in the US we are familiar with the US Dollar. Different countries have different currencies or forms of money. In the US, we have the US Dollar. But in India, it’s a rupee. And the value of the currency of one US dollar is equivalent to 82 rupees (at the time of this podcast). This is known as an exchange rate. The value of one currency versus another country. This actually changes as it’s tied to the global market. So if the US market were to go up, then the value of the dollar would be even greater. Google has an easy currency converter if you want to try it out and compare your currency to another and see the difference in value. Will paper money one day go away?  Well, who knows? But Elon Musk stated so in a podcast interview four years ago stating cryptocurrency is a far better way to transfer value than pieces of paper. Our generation may be the ones to touch those green bills or shiny coins the least ever.  Just remember money is a tool. You can make it work for you. Build wealth. Give to others and make a difference. Or cause yourself financial ruin and make a mess of things with it. Having money doesn’t always translate to happiness or bliss either as many might think. Having money means having choices. It gives you independence and freedom.  Like Zig Zigler said in our opening quote. It’s not the most important thing in life, but you gotta have it. And learning to manage it well early in life is what this podcast is about. A book review coming up next! We’re introducing a new segment on the show today. My Mom… “Hello”… is going to start giving a quick book review in some shows. Warren Buffet and Mark Cuban are avid readers and have both stated in interviews that everyone has access to the same information they do. It’s just a matter of who takes the time to consume that information. Books are a great tool and there are many financial books to choose from. My Mom is focused on the ones she feels are good starting points for our listeners. Take it away Mom! Mom: Thanks, Cash Kid! Today I’m spotlighting the book “How to Turn $100 into 1,000,000” by James McKenna and Jeannine Glista. I was able to check this out at our local library. It’s a great starter book to break down basic money concepts. It gives creative ways to make money and make it grow at a young age. Check it out of your local library or it’s less than ten dollars on Amazon. Happy reading! Thanks, Mom! Just remember, money is a tool that can help you throughout your life. So, get motivated to grow your super financial skills in the next episode. Remember to visit our website at cashkidpodcast.com, leave a review wherever you are listening from, and follow us on Instagram. Cash Kid Out!
Super Financial Literacy Skills
Oct 16 2023
Super Financial Literacy Skills
This episode launches season 2 of the Ca$h Kid Podcast. We need to build our knowledge to create smart financial habits. That’s what this season of the Cash Kid podcast will be all about. How to build "Super Financial Literacy Skills." What are students lacking? How does always using a debit or credit card affect our financial habits? Find those answers and more from a high school teacher who works to teach financial skills to juniors and seniors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript Super Financial Literacy Skills “Mr. Buffet, how can I make 30 billion dollars?  Start young.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fErzHbEiQIs   That’s Warren Buffet speaking at a conference years ago. Start young he says.  Wise advice from a man who bought his first stock at age 11. But to start young, we need to build our knowledge to create smart financial habits. That’s what this season of the Cash Kid podcast will be all about. How to build Super Financial Literacy skills.   And today, it starts with an interview with a high school teacher who works every day to do just that. I’m so excited to start this new season and new journey with my fellow cash kids. The Cash Kid podcast is underway.   Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday. Here you go, sweetie. Thanks, Grandma.   Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid.   Joining me today is Mr. Ryan Halla. He’s a business and personal finance teacher at Vestavia Hills High School in Alabama.   Welcome to the show Mr. Halla.   Ryan Halla: Thank you. Good to be on!   Cash Kid:  First, tell us a little bit about yourself.   Ryan Halla: I’ve been a teacher for a long time. Graduated from Vestavia Hills in 1992. I played baseball at Auburn after that and then played baseball a little while after Auburn. Got into teaching and coaching when I was about 29 years old. Been doing it ever sense. I’ve got two kids. I've been married for 25 years and.   Cash Kid: Okay. So what led you to wanting to teach people personal and business finance to high schoolers?   Ryan Halla: Well, it actually kind of chose me. One thing led to another, and I ended up getting into the business curriculu. Which I have found to be very useful and very enjoyable. Because I'll be honest with you, a lot of things in school I   necessarily say I use today, but I same thing I tell all my kids as far as personal finance goes that they will definitely, definitely use that at some point in their lifetime.   Cash Kid: Do you remember what kind of financial literacy material, if you had any or found or given when you were growing up?   Ryan Halla: The only stuff I remember when I was a kid was we counted the paper nickels and the paper pennies and things like that. But as far as true financial literacy, I really don't recall. And I don't want to insult any of my teachers because it was a while ago, but I don't recall ever going over that.   Cash Kid: Also, about your thoughts on what type of financial literacy is needed in schools today and when you should it start being taught.     Ryan Halla: I think basic financial language, as far as, you know, checking accounts and savings accounts and things of that nature, I think that should begin in middle school. Then I think as you progress and you know, because I have a bunch of I teach a bunch of juniors and seniors, they all have jobs. They get real paychecks. So I think at the end of the day, when they get to be maybe a sophomore, you start talking about actually taxes.   And, you know, taxes is not fun to talk about anyway. I'm not trying to insult any CPAs, but they I'm not sure income taxes which I’m talking about as far as what comes out of their paycheck you know the FICA taxes and and the state and federal tax is probably discussion and I think they can all use, you know, savings account discussions and checking account discussions. A lot of my kids don't know the difference when a debit and a credit card.   Cash Kid: Yeah, we're going to cover that soon in an upcoming episode.   Ryan Halla: Uh, good!   Cash Kid: Would you say there's a lack of financial skills taught in schools, and if so, why?   Ryan Halla: I'm going to say, no, there's not, because I'm teaching it. I would say that I don't really know other people's curriculum, but I do think that as far as Vestavia goes we do a pretty good job of maybe introducing it to them. I think it's I think it's funny, though, because I think a lot of kids don't really understand and having taught for a while, they're like anybody to know they don't understand something. So I think a lot of times they just kind of sit there and pretend like they understand, but they get out in the real world and it's pretty obvious they don't understand.   Cash Kid: What are ways parents can get involved to teach these concepts?   Ryan Halla: I think parents can just kind of mimic the correct behavior. I know correct is a vague term in this, but I think they can just mimic and show the kids. I mean, kids understand more of what they see than what they hear. So I think if you can tell them and I think sometimes, you know, people with means, I think the hardest thing is to tell a kid, no, kids don't really have a concept of of financial skills because they've just always had.   And then when they get out by themselves, they don't really understand where the money went. So I think just just talk and sit down and have a conversation with them and say, and I'm old school. I think allowance is a good idea. I don't really care how much the allowance is because it teaches them the basic concept, basic skills of how to save money, how much things cos. Because also, whether people believe it or not, our main our main purpose is to be an educated consumer in this. You know, we understand how much milk should cost. We don't pay $20 from milk. I think when kids get an allowance to learn that at home, I think they're better suited when they get out in the real, quote unquote, real world.   Cash Kid: What do you find your students are lacking when it comes to financial literacy today?   Ryan Halla: I think taxes is a foreign concept, every single one of them. Because I've asked that question, I said, how many of you have gotten a paycheck and a lot of them raise their hand. I said, be honest with me. How many of ya’ll were shocked and stunned by how much was missing? And they all were. And that's common. Most people are like that when they get their first paycheck.   But I really think that just I mean, it's a basic overall concept of, where money comes from. I mean, I've had kids that thought that when you took money to a bank, you had a vault of your own, that they took your $100 when you deposit put it in there. And then when you went back a week later, they went back to that same vault, gave you that same $100.   So I think maybe an idea of how it works and what banks actually do with that money and how to access money. I mean, there's a lot of things there. There's a lot of things that that need to be discussed.   Cash Kid: What can be done to help instill greater financial knowledge to the next generation.   Ryan Halla: If every kid could listen to this podcast and hear my voice, then that would make everything better. I'm just kidding.   Cash Kid: Hahaha… I’m good with that!   Ryan Halla: Okay, let's go.   Ryan Halla: I just think what I said. And I think parents can get more involved and I think kids need to get more bored. We seem to push a lot of the lot of the blame on parents or schools or whatever it is. But if the kids not willing to be involved or get involved too, in their own learning, then it's really kind of pointless.   So I think we've got to figure out a way to get the kids involved and understand that the concepts that they're learning about the financial literacy is because people will talk to you about anything else in the world other than money. Nobody likes to talk about their own money and what they do with it. So I think when people are like that, there is no conversation going on about it.   And I think that I think I really think the parents and families could get involved more and have an understanding.   Cash Kid: What is your goal for your students when they leave your class?   Ryan Halla: I think I think just have a basic understanding. Basically, if they go out in the real world, they can understand that what's what their paycheck looks like. They can understand how much things cost because like a lot of times people have no concept of how much the grocery store, especially nowadays or how much how much gas costs because they have mom or dad or aunt or uncle or grandfather or whoever it is, credit card and they just run that credit card.   They don't understand that they just paid $65 for gas. So, just a basic understanding, really very basic understanding of how much things cost, where they can put their money. We touch on investments, but that to me is kind of advanced financial literacy. I think basic is just just managing your money. I just really I don't want any of them to struggle with money is really my goal.   Cash Kid: Are there any books that you can recommend to your audience, either for parents or kids to continue their further knowledge?   Ryan Halla: Um, one book does come to mind. It's by everybody's favorite self-help guru, Tony Robbins. It's called Money Master the Game. And the main concept he likes is that he talks about his three buckets for investments, and those are there's security of growth. And then a dream bucket and how you move money to each one of those buckets and you fill up one before you fill up the next one because once your security that's kind of emergency fund as Dave Ramsey would say in your growth bucket that's kind of retirement future car whatever you try to save for once those are filled, then you move on to that drain bucket of, you know, if you want to go on that dream vacation, whatever it is. But his language is is pretty simple to understand. I think the book  certain parts of it very helpful.   Cash Kid: Mr. Halla do you find there’s this generation shift where there’s less cash and never physically seeing the money? Everything is just like in the cloud, basically and how they can affect money management for this generation.   Ryan Halla: Correct. Correct. I mean,  cash is I always tell my kids, I said, if you can get cash out, get cash out, because cash is easier to see it go down. Like, you know, if you've got a lot of cash in your pocket and that wad starts getting smaller, you understand, Hey, I've spent some money. But if I'm using a card, I don't ever see especially a credit card, because then you're like, well, I still have money in my account.   And I have I spent money. So I don't understand. You know, there's I try to throw a lot of statistics at my kids and, you know, statistics like 56% of all Americans have less than $1,000 in savings. And half of those 56% have less than $1,000 that they would need if they had $1,000 expense. So what that leads to is a constant, constant state of borrowing.   And I'm not going to bark like Dave Ramsey and say that all debt is terrible, awful, no good. But I do understand the concept that if I can't pay a bill and I need to go borrow money or use a credit card to pay that bill, what am I going to do next month when I've got a new bill and I couldn't pay it?   And then it becomes a snowball. It just becomes a bad situation. And that that I guess to answer the previous question, I said that is kind of, what I would like my kids to understand. But I do think that that just swipe your cards because how many times does it say, hey, you know when I was a kid, your mom would say, hey, go get this for me and she would give you $10. Well, you were like, man, if I only spend five, I could keep five. But now the parents are giving them their card. Say, hey, go get it. And now the kid's going in there buying a Coke, buying some chips, and buying some gas with no concept of what that cost because it was on a card.   They didn't see the number. They didn't pay attention to it. They just put a PIN number in and moved on.   Cash Kid: Yeah, great points. Um, is there anything else we haven't asked you that you would like to share with our audience?   Ryan Halla: No, other than I think this is a very great concept to have somebody who is in your position to talk about this, because I think that when kids your kids talk about that's a little different than hearing a 50 year old man talk about, well.   Cash Kid: Well, we agree. That’s why we started this podcast to help my generation get financially smart early because there's are definitely opportunities for kids now to start investing and saving earlier. Mr. Halla, we appreciate your time and expertise. Thank you for joining us on the Cash Kid Podcast and boosting the financial knowledge of fellow Cash Kids everywhere. So many great topics and interviews to come. Remember to visit our website at cashkidpodcast.com, leave a review wherever you are listening from, and follow us on Instagram. Cash Kid Out!
A talk with the CA$H KID.
Sep 25 2023
A talk with the CA$H KID.
What's next for the CA$H KID Podcast? Listen in as he wraps up season 1 and talks about where we are headed next. There are lots of topics to cover with this podcast and we want you involved. You'll hear ways you can be engaged and always know what's happening with the CA$H KID Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Transcript What’s Next for the Cash Kid Podcast? Hey Cash Kids! First off, I huge thank you for joining this podcast and helping us grow this audience. In just the first season of the Cash Kid Podcast, we’ve watched this audience grow daily. It’s got friends and family I know talking about their finances more and asking questions to make better financial decisions. I’m learning along with you and so glad you are here with us on this journey. This episode will mark the end of the first season of the Cash Kid Podcast… but no worries! A new season will start in just two to three weeks. Where are we headed? That and more of my thoughts on this podcast and it’s future…, coming up. The Cash Kid Podcast is underway. Intro tease: So you’ve got some cash. Maybe from an allowance, or that money your grandma gave you for your 7th birthday (Here you go, sweetie.) Thanks, grandma. Whatever it is, what are you going to do with it? Spend it, hide it away… or maybe invest it? Let’s start learning how to make that money grow. Time to learn how to be a cash kid. (cash register) First, let’s rewind (tape rewinding effect) and talk about how this podcast even got started. I was given an assignment in school to create a passion project. Many of my classmates were doing fundraisers, or creating websites to share knowledge about a non-profit or health issue. But I knew what my passion was… the stock market and investing, so I wanted to create a podcast. My teacher said I would be the first to create a podcast from this project. I came home and told my Mom.. and in full disclosure, I knew I had the materials to create a podcast. You see, my Mom is a full-time voice-over talent and we have a sound studio in our home. When I told her what I wanted to do, she said great… but in her mind, I think she was panicking a little. Mom: I wouldn't say I was panicking. I just saw myself getting a lot less sleep. We set out to create 4 episodes. And if you go back AND review the first four you’ll see I started out talking first about the stock market because well, that’s what I’m passionate about. We got great feedback and my teachers, friends, and family encouraged me to continue it. So, we met with a podcast producer to get some guidance and we’ve been growing the podcast ever since. We have so many plans and topics we feel we can cover. From financial literacy terms, what jobs can kids do to make money, how to get your first job, scholarships, and of course how to start investing early. It’s my goal to help my generation, Gen Alpha, to be the smartest financial generation ever. I mean, why not?!  Think of how many problems that could solve. But I’ve also learned from adults talking to me about the podcast, they are finding the information useful as well. I’m grateful for all listeners, young and young at heart. So, if you haven’t yet, please go back and start from episode 1 and listen in. This first season we touched on a little bit of everything from the stock market, budgeting, investment advice, the type of spender or saver you are, and interviewed three other fellow “Cash Kids” on how they're making money. In season two, we plan to start breaking it down and we feel the best way to do that is focus on financial terms… that frankly, many adults don’t even know or understand. As we move into season 2 though, I wanted to communicate ways to be engaged and never miss out.  First, if you haven’t already visit us at cashkidpodcast.com. All episodes are posted here. You can even read the transcripts for each episode. Find contact details for our guests. And be sure to sign up for our mailing list for alerts when new episodes are released.  Also, creating a podcast isn’t free. If you’d like to support the growth of this podcast, there is an option on my website to buy me a coffee. These funds will help us continue to grow the show and are most appreciated! And most important, you can leave a review or feedback right on our website. Plus, follow the Cash Kid Podcast on Instagram. We post new content weekly to know what’s going on.  The same for YouTube. We actually have some teachers already using the YouTube videos of each episode to play for their students. This is so exciting to hear! And most importantly, listen in each week. The Cash Kid Podcast is on all major podcasting platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, etc. And whatever platform you choose, please take 3 seconds after listening and rate the podcast. This helps boost our ratings and reach a larger audience. Well, that’s a wrap on season 1. Just remember, anyone can be a Cash Kid, you just have to learn how to become one. Cash Kid, out! Disclaimer: The information presented represents the views and opinions of the guests. This show does not intend to provide personal investment advice through this podcast. This content has been made for informational and educational purposes only. To make a full and informed investment decision, we advise you to speak with a financial advisor and for kids, definitely your parents first before investing.