Tech Field Day Podcast

Tech Field Day

The Tech Field Day Podcast is the only podcast that dares to be both on topic, or on premise, and sometimes on location, bringing together a group of independent IT luminaries and experts in their field from around the Enterprise to discuss a single idea revolving around their technological knowledge base and skillset. This podcast is hosted by Stephen Foskett, Organizer of the Tech Field Day event series, and Tom Hollingsworth, Tech Field Day Event Lead. read less
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Episodes

6. Data Quality is More Important Than Ever in an AI World with Qlik
May 7 2024
6. Data Quality is More Important Than Ever in an AI World with Qlik
In our AI-dominated world, data quality is the key to building useful tools. This episode of the Tech Field Day podcast features Drew Clarke from Qlik discussing best practiced for integrating data sources with AI models with Joey D'Antoni, Gina Rosenthal, and Stephen Foskett before Qlik Connect in Orlando. Although there is a lot of hype about AI in industry, companies are realizing the risks of generative AI and large language models as well. Solid data practices in terms of data hygiene, proven data models, business intelligence, and flows can ensure that the output of an AI application is correct. The proliferation of Generative AI is also causing a rapid increase in the cost and environmental impact IT systems and this will impact the success of this technology. Good data practices can help, allowing a lighter and less expensive LLM to produce quality results. The Tech Field Day delegates will learn more about these topics at Qlik Connect in Orlando, and we will be recording and sharing content as well. Host: Stephen Foskett, Organizer of the Tech Field Day Event Series: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sfoskett Qlik Representative: Drew Clarke, General Manager & EVP, Data Business Unit at Qlik: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewdclarke/ Delegates: Gina Rosenthal: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gminks/ Joey D'Antoni: https://www.linkedin.com/in/josephdantoni/ Tech Field Day: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tech-field-day X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfieldday Podcast: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com/podcast X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfielddaypod Tags: #TFDPodcast, #QlikConnect, #Sponsored, #AI, @Qlik, @TechFieldDay, @TechFieldDayPod, @SFoskett, @GMinks, @GestaltIT, @JDAnton,
5. Containerization is Required to Modernize Applications at the Edge
Apr 30 2024
5. Containerization is Required to Modernize Applications at the Edge
Modern applications are widely deployed in the cloud, but they're coming at the edge as well. This episode of the Tech Field Day podcast features Alastair Cooke and Paul Nashawaty from The Futurum Group, Erik Nordmark from ZEDEDA, and host Stephen Foskett discussing the intersection of application modernization and edge computing. As enterprises look to deploy more applications at the edge they are leveraging technologies like Kubernetes and containers to enable portability, scalability, resilience, and high availability. In many cases customers are moving existing web applications to the edge to improve performance and security, but not all webscale technologies are appropriate on the limited hardware, environmentals, and connectivity found at the edge. The question is whether to improve the edge compute platform or build resiliency into the application itself. But there are limits to this approach, since edge locations don't have the elasticity of the cloud and many of the features of Kubernetes were not designed for limited resources. It comes down to developer expectations, since they are now accustomed to the experience of modern webscale platforms and expect this environment everywhere. In the future, we expect WASM, LLMs, and more to be used regardless of location. Host: Stephen Foskett: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sfoskett/ Panalists: Alastair Cooke, CTO Advisor at The Futurum Group: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alastaircooke/ Paul Nashawaty, Practice Lead, Application Development Modernization at The Futurum Group: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulnashawaty/ Erik Nordmark, CTO and Co-founder, ZEDEDA: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erik-nordmark-77124310/ Tech Field Day: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tech-field-day X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfieldday Podcast: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com/podcast X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfielddaypod Tags: #TFDPodcast, #EdgeComputing, #Kubernetes, @ZEDEDAEdge, @TechFieldDay, @TechFieldDayPodcast, @TheFuturumGroup, @DemitasseNZ, @SFoskett, @PNashawaty,
1. Credible Content From the Community is More Important than Ever
Apr 2 2024
1. Credible Content From the Community is More Important than Ever
There is a hazardous amount of AI-generated and SEO-oriented content being generated, and the solution is real stories from real communities. In the first episode of Tech Field Podcast, recorded on-site at AI Field Day, Stephen Foskett chats with Frederic Van Haren, Gina Rosenthal and Colleen Coll about confronting inauthentic content. The internet is inundated with low-quality, AI-generated, and SEO-driven content, and the antidote is the cultivation of real, credible voices within the tech community. The discussion focuses on the importance of community-driven content and the credibility of individual voices in an era dominated by content optimized for algorithms rather than human engagement. The rise of generative AI in content creation and consumption is accelerating, and we must all find a balance between technological advancements and human insight. This is the essence of the Tech Field Day experience, which fosters meaningful dialogue among tech professionals and companies in the industry. For fifteen years Tech Field Day has highlighted the critical role of human connection and credible voices in navigating the digital information landscape, and this re-launched podcast is part of that continuing effort. Host: Stephen Foskett, Organizer of the Tech Field Day Event Series: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sfoskett/ Panelists: Frederic Van Haren: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredericvharen/ Gina Rosenthal: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gminks/ Colleen Coll: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colleen-coll-b971505/ Tech Field Day: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tech-field-day X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfieldday Podcast: Website: https://www.techfieldday.com/podcast X/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/techfielddaypod Tags: #TechFieldDayPodcast, #AIFD4, #AI, #TechFieldDay, @SFoskett, @TechFieldDay, @TechFieldDayPod, @FredericVHaren, @GMinks, @ColleenColl,
AI Demands a New Storage Architecture with Hammerspace
Mar 19 2024
AI Demands a New Storage Architecture with Hammerspace
Hammerspace unveiled a new storage architecture called Hyperscale NAS that addresses the needs of AI and GPU computing. This episode of the On-Premise IT podcast, sponsored by Hammerspace, is focused on the extreme requirements of high-performance multi-node computing. Eric Bassier of Hammerspace joins Chris Grundemann, Frederic Van Haren, and Stephen Foskett to consider the characteristics that define this new storage architecture. Hammerspace leverages parallel NFS and flexible file layout (FlexFiles) within the NFS protocol to deliver unprecedented scalability and performance. AI training requires scalability, performance, and low latency but also flexible and robust data management, which makes Hyperscale NAS extremely attractive. Now that the Linux kernel includes NFS v4.2, the Hammerspace Hyperscale NAS system works out of the box with standards-based clients rather than requiring a proprietary client. Hammerspace is currently deployed in massive hyperscale datacenters and is used in some of the largest AI training scenarios. Host: Stephen Foskett, Organizer of the Tech Field Day Event Series: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sfoskett/ Panel: Frederic Van Haren, CTO and Founder of HighFens, Inc.: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredericvharen/ Chris Grundemann, Managing Director at Grundemann Solutions: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cgrundemann/ Hammerspace Representative: Eric Bassier, Senior Director, Solution Marketing at Hammerspace: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-bassier/ Follow Gestalt IT Website: https://www.GestaltIT.com/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/GestaltIT LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/Gestalt-IT
The Future of AI Needs Ethernet
Feb 27 2024
The Future of AI Needs Ethernet
The development of AI networking is moving forward and Ethernet is taking a prime role in how workloads will communicate. In this episode, Tom Hollingsworth is joined by Drew Conry-Murray and Jordan Martin as well as J Metz, the chair of the Ultra Ethernet Consortium, to discuss the progress being made by the UEC to develop Ethernet to meet the needs of AI. They discuss the roadmap for adoption of technologies as well as the drivers for the additions to the protocol and how people can get involved. Podcast Information: * Tom Hollingsworth is a Networking and Security Specialist at Gestalt IT and Event Lead for Tech Field Day. You can connect with Tom on LinkedIn and X/Twitter. Find out more on his blog or on the Tech Field Day website. * J Metz is the Chair of both the Ultra Ethernet Consortium and SNIA, as well as a Technical Director at AMD. You can connect with J on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter. Learn more about The Ultra Ethernet Consortium on their website. Learn more about SNIA on their website. Learn more about AMD’s AI efforts here. * Jordan Martin is the Principal Solutions Architect at World Wide Technologies. You can connect with Jordan on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter. * Drew Conry-Murray is the Content Director over at Packet Pushers. You can connect with Drew on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter and find more on what Drew is doing over at Packet Pushers. Gestalt IT and Tech Field Day are now part of The Futurum Group. Follow us on Twitter! AND
Generative AI is Developing Applications
Feb 20 2024
Generative AI is Developing Applications
Generative AI is becoming a key tool for software developers, and businesses are embracing it as well. This episode of the On-Premise IT podcast brings Paul Nashawaty of The Futurum Group, data expert Karen Lopez, and Stephen Foskett together to discuss how AI is impacting application development. Generative AI is incredibly compelling, rapidly producing credible output. that it’s hard to put a stop to it. Rather than trying to stand in the way, companies are looking for better quality tools, with data privacy and compliance capabilities to fend off the negatives that can arise from AI-generated content. AI can also help with tasks like documentation and testing that are less popular and more problematic, and these can improve overall code quality as well. Podcast Information: * Stephen Foskett is the Publisher of Gestalt IT and Organizer of Tech Field Day, now part of The Futurum Group. Find Stephen’s writing at Gestalt IT and connect with him on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter. * Paul Nashawaty is a Practice Lead focused on Application Development Modernization at The Futurum Group. You can connect with Paul on LinkedIn and learn more about his research and analysis on The Futurum Group’s website. * Karen Lopez is a Data Expert and Data Management Specialist. You can connect with Karen on LinkedIn and on X/Twitter and learn more on her website. Gestalt IT and Tech Field Day are now part of The Futurum Group. Follow us on Twitter! AND SUBSCRIBE to our newsletter for more great coverage right in your inbox.
Hardware Can’t Keep Up With Software
Feb 13 2024
Hardware Can’t Keep Up With Software
Modern workloads are overloading hardware systems, and the CPUs in the market today aren’t up to the task. In this episode of On-Premise IT Podcast recorded on the premises of the Cloud Field Day event in California, host Stephen Foskett is joined by Thomas LaRock, Shala Warner, and Jim Czuprynski from the IT world, to talk about innovation in hardware. The discussion addresses the burning question of whether investing in more specialized hardware will solve the problem. Hear the panel explain how hardware innovation is intertwined with software innovation, and how the two components come together to power cutting-edge workloads. Podcast Information: * Stephen Foskett is the Publisher of Gestalt IT and Organizer of Tech Field Day, now part of The Futurum Group. Find Stephen’s writing at Gestalt IT and connect with him on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter. * Thomas LaRock is a data professional technical advocate who specializes in data science. You can connect with Thomas on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter and read more on his website. * Shala Warner is a Cloud Architect and a DevOps Engineer. You can connect with Shala on LinkedIn or on X/Twitter and learn more about her on her website. * Jim Czuprynski is the Chief Storyteller at Zero Defect Computing. You can connect with Jim on LinkedIn or on Mastodon and learn more about him on his website. Gestalt IT and Tech Field Day are now part of The Futurum Group. Follow us on Twitter! AND SUBSCRIBE to our newsletter for more great coverage right in your inbox.
Platform Engineering Isn’t Just DevOps Renamed
Jan 30 2024
Platform Engineering Isn’t Just DevOps Renamed
Platform engineering has been happening for a long time, but today’s implication is quite different. This episode of the On-Premise IT podcast brings platform engineering expert Michael Levan, industry analyst Steven Dickens, and host Stephen Foskett to consider what platform engineering is today. Building a platform for self service in the cloud has more in common with product development than the platforms delivered historically by IT infrastructure teams. One of the drivers for the DevOps trend was the divergence of IT development and operations over the last few decades, but this was different in the mainframe world. In many ways, today’s platform engineering teams are more mature process-wise thanks to the demands of multi-tenant cloud applications. Inside IT’s Hottest Technology Trend, Platform Engineering The term “platform engineering” has exploded in IT. Explainers and articles are rife about platform engineering’s boundless implications. Some are defining it as a niche battle, others are calling it the DevOps killer, and some are projecting it as a million-dollar career. Whatever it is, findings show that it is at the peak of the hype cycle, and is settling into a new standard. In this episode of On-Premise IT podcast, host Stephen Foskett and guests, Steven Dickens, VP and Practice Leader at The Futurum Group, and Michael Levan, Kubernetes and Platform Engineering Specialist, lift the blinds obscuring this new sensation. Marketing Fluff or an Emerging Trend? The answer lies somewhere in the middle. The proclivity to slap new labels on old things is not new in marketing. The hype about platform engineering is somewhat the same. “We’ve been doing platform engineering for a really long time. It just has a name and a focus point now, but it’s not something that just popped out of nowhere,” says Levan. Dickens likens it to the role of Mainframe developers. “The Mainframe guys speak in different tongues and worship different gods than the distributed and cloud guys, but if you took away the nomenclatures and actually looked at the job, it would be the same functional work.” What’s the Hype about? So why it being loved to death now? Because platform engineering does what software delivery processes benefit from most. It drives standardization and automation. In a way, platform engineering is like the Hibachi experience. At a traditional Hibachi-style Japanese place, diners select their choice of noodles, meat, broth, sauce and toppings from the counter. At the bar, the chefs wield their knives, chopping, grilling, and cooking the ingredients into a hearty bowl of goodness. Platform engineers do the same thing for the development environment. Platform engineering is the methodology to bring disparate components together into a platform in a way that makes sense, ultimately elevating the developer’s experience. In doing so, it alleviates the challenge of having to constantly worry about the platform. The modern stack that engineers interface with can be broadly divided into three categories – the platform, the capabilities and the UI.
Cloud Repatriation is Really Happening
Jan 23 2024
Cloud Repatriation is Really Happening
Now that businesses have deployed modern applications in the cloud they are starting to ask whether it might be more attractive to run these on-premises. This episode of the On-Premise IT podcast features Jason Benedicic, Camberley Bates, and Ian Sanderson discussing the pros and cons of cloud repatriation with Stephen Foskett. A recent blog post by 37 Signals got the Tech Field Day delegates talking about the reality of running modern applications in enterprise-owned clouds, whether in the datacenter or co-located. Certainly the hardware and software are available to move applications on-prem, and some workloads may be better served this way. Most of the necessary components to run modern web applications are available on-prem, from Kubernetes to Postgres to Kafka, but these can prove difficult to manage, which is one of the things as-a-service customers are paying for. Looking back to the debut of OpenStack, enterprises have wanted to run applications in-house but they found it too difficult to manage. OpenShift is much more attractive thanks to the support and integration of the platform, but many customers have financial and administrative reasons for as-a-service deployment. It might not be a mass exodus, but there are plenty of examples of repatriation of modern applications. Why Companies Are Moving Off of the Public Cloud A new trend coming out of the enterprise IT industry is cloud repatriation. The chatter picked up when 37signals, a SaaS project management company, publicly announced that it saved $1 million by pulling apps away from public cloud. According to CTO, David Heinemeier Hansson, repatriation has shrunken the company’s cloud spend by 60%, and is projected to save an estimated $10 million over the next five years. And theirs’ is not an isolated case. Skyrocketing costs of data and storage in the cloud have caused a lot of companies to pull away and migrate back to on premise datacenters in the last few years. Seagate has built its own platform to deploy web applications that runs in their private datacenter on owned hardware. More recently, LinkedIn has called off plans to move workloads from on-site to Azure Cloud. So are companies really abandoning their cloud computing dreams and hauling wares back to where they started? At the recent On-Premise IT Podcast, host Stephen Foskett addressed this question that’s lately been the talk of Silicon Valley. Public Cloud Offerings Come at a Premium When considering relocating technology, the reasonings fall into two main buckets – cost and control. “As we went into 2024, a lot of very large enterprises are concerned about costs. So there is this ongoing effort for cost management, and what is happening is a recalculation or reevaluation of where the workloads are to be placed and why. That workload rationalization has been going on for some time,” notes Camberley Bates, VP Practice Lead at The Futurum Group. Enterprises’ rationale behind migrating to cloud was to reduce OpEx. The cloud offered an attractive answer to the surging cost problem in on-premise datacenters. The promise however soured as companies started to struggle with cost blowouts.