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Ask the Dentist with Dr. Mark Burhenne

Dr. Mark Burhenne - Functional Dentist

Each episode addresses a reader's dental issue through the lens of Dr. B's root cause and evidence-based approach to dental health and dentistry. Dr. Burhenne is a functional dentist and bestselling author whose website AsktheDentist.com is visited by millions of readers each year.
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Is a DSO for me?
4d ago
37 mins
Is a DSO for me?
The COVID-19 pandemic was particularly hard on small businesses, including private dental practices. Many of these practices have turned to Dental Support Organizations (DSOs) to keep them afloat. Join us today as we dive into the politics of dentistry and DSOs with Dr. B! We hear the pros and cons of being part of a DSO as a dental practitioner, and how the type of practice you choose can affect your outcomes as a patient. Find out why Dr. B was fired from his very first job, and the experiences he has had that have made him wary of DSOs. Get some practical advice on how to ensure you are getting the best treatment available, regardless of whether you’re at a DSO or not, and why it’s so beneficial to be treated by a functional dentist. Dr. B also shares some great links on how the workforce is changing as millennials enter it. For all this, and more on the future of dentistry and DSOs, press play now!Key Points From This Episode:The topic that Dr. B feels that we have not discussed enough [0:00:17]Dental Support Organizations (DSO): why they have sprung up after the COVID-19 pandemic, and why Dr. B chose not to join one [0:01:19]The benefits of a DSO: reducing the overhead of a dental practice [0:02:33]What a DSO is, and the many different roles running a dental practice requires [0:04:19]Why Dr. B gets nervous when there’s an association of support organizations [0:06:16]The reason for today’s episode: educating patients about what could happen when you choose a dentist involved with a DSO [0:07:31]Dr. B’s first experience with a DSO [0:08:29]The advantages of DSOs: dentists can focus on patients, and they get access to the latest technology [0:15:12]Why young dentists with student debts are drawn to DSOs [0:17:14]The situations that drive dentists to join a DSO [0:18:03]The disadvantages of DSOs: a lack of independence, the focus turns to profit and not patients, and the Dentist-patient relationship suffers [0:18:58]Who the largest DSOs in the USA are [0:22:24]Dr. B’s other experience of DSOs as an expert witness: unnecessary treatments and no patient education [0:23:09]What if you were to see a functional dentist? [0:28:17]The future of DSOs [0:33:00]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Association of Dental Support OrganizationsThe Cons and Pros of DSOs by Dr. Gordon J. ChristensenHeartland DentalAspen DentalPacific Dental ServicesGreat ExpressionsAffordable Dentures & ImplantsWestern Dental & Orthodontics Ask the Dentist: Assorted Articles About Margarita PlansAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
4d ago
37 mins
What Is Enamel Hypoplasia?
Hearing that your child has enamel hypoplasia can be incredibly distressing, for both the parent and the dentist! Today Dr. B talks to us about what enamel hypoplasia means, why dentists start sweating when they see it, and why it isn’t your fault as a parent. We hear how to identify enamel hypoplasia, and the tools you will need to keep an eye on it, as well as the potential outcomes of leaving it untreated. Dr. B discusses the various causes of enamel hypoplasia commonly listed in textbooks, and the causes that he and Dr. Staci Whitman have observed that are not yet included in mainstream dental education. We hear advice on how you can best avoid it, from adjusting your peri-natal diet to maintaining a stress-free pregnancy and avoiding fluoride. Find out how enamel hypoplasia should be treated, and the questions to ask your dentist to be sure they are doing the right thing. We look forward to having you join us!Key Points From This Episode:The topic that strikes fear into the heart of dentists [0:00:10]Why it’s important for a patient to understand why dentists fear hypoplasia [0:01:35]Today’s question: Does Dr. B have any suggestions to improve or reverse enamel hypoplasia? [0:02:43]Some background on enamel hyperplasia and what it is [0:03:06]What the signs are of enamel hypoplasia [0:04:40]Why it can sometimes be difficult to detect enamel hypoplasia: when it occurs below the gumline [0:06:40]The negative outcomes of having enamel hypoplasia [0:07:52]The causes of enamel hypoplasia: what the textbooks say [0:08:09]The causes of enamel hypoplasia that Dr. B and Dr. Staci have observed, that aren’t yet in the textbooks [0:13:16]Dr. B’s thoughts on fluoride and its impact on tooth development [0:15:04]The difference between fluorosis and hypoplasia [0:15:53]Another explanation for enamel hypoplasia: rickets and a vitamin D deficiency [0:16:40]Why Dr. B always asks parents if the child had a high fever prior to the discovery of hypoplasia [0:17:32]The take-home message from today’s episode: don’t feel bad, it’s not your fault, and it can be treated [0:18:14]How to check on your kid’s teeth [0:19:25]Dr. B’s advice for women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant [0:19:52]Why you can't usually reverse enamel hypoplasia and tips on how to prevent it worsening [0:20:17]The oral-systemic connection: how enamel hypoplasia is a prime example of this [0:22:33]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Dr. Staci Whitman on the Functional Dentist DirectoryAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Jan 18 2022
25 mins
Should You Share Your Oral Microbiome With Your Child?
As kids, many of us grew up kissing our parents on the mouth. Today’s question centers around this, with a listener querying Dr. B’s advice not to kiss kids on the mouth! Tune in to find out why Dr. B advises against this, even though our ancestors have been doing it for centuries. We find out why this behavior was mostly okay in our past, but why it is a potentially dangerous habit in today's society. We break down how kids acquire their oral microbiome (vaginal birth and breastfeeding), and the alternative routes available for those who undergo C-section and/or can't be breastfed. Hear why it's so important for your kids to travel with their toothbrushes and the conditions that can be transferred when kissing. We also learn of the exciting mRNA test that will be coming out in early 2022, and what Dr. B has planned for us! Don't miss out on this important information. Key Points From This Episode:How today’s question made Dr. B realize that he has not explained enough in this topic [0:00:30]Today’s question: Can you share good bugs with your kids when kissing them? [0:01:47]The difference between our oral microbiome and that of our ancestors [0:03:16]How vaginal birth establishes the oral microbiome during birth [0:04:45]Dr. B’s suggestion to populate the oral microbiome if the child is born via C-section, and/or can’t be breastfed: diet, and preventing mouth breathing [0:05:27]The importance of physical affection with kids [0:06:44]Why you need to be careful when teaching your child who to kiss on the lips [0:07:11]When you shouldn’t kiss your kids on the mouth [0:08:01] Why your kid should always travel with their own toothbrush [0:08:14]Looking at our ancestors’ lifestyle compared to our own [0:09:04]Hear about the mRNA test coming out early in 2022! [0:10:01]Wrapping up with the impact of the oral microbiome on our overall health and why Dr. B appreciates today’s question [0:11:09]The exciting topics and business adventures you can expect to hear about in 2022 [0:12:18]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Ask the Dentist: Collected Articles and Podcasts on the Oral MicrobiomeAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Jan 11 2022
15 mins
Does Sorbitol Cause Cavities?
What do art history and functional dentistry have in common? They both require primary sources when researching a contentious question! Today's question focuses on Sorbitol and whether or not it can cause tooth decay. Dr. B answers this question but also takes us through his methodology when investigating a chemical, so that you can apply critical thinking to the chemicals that affect you daily. From simply googling the question to a deep dive into the literature available using the NIH's PubChem database, follow along step-by-step as the impact of Sorbitol on your teeth is untangled. We discover the most likely cause of the conflicting information available on the internet and how you can identify unreliable sources. We learn what Sorbitol is on a chemical level, how it's metabolized by humans and the bugs in our microbiome, and how it's made. We also touch on Xylitol and why Dr. B only likes some forms of it, and discover the other chemicals that are in Dr. B's investigative crosshairs for 2022. Tune in to learn all of this and more in today's educational episode!Key Points From This Episode:Using functional dentistry and logic to answer health questions [0:0:31]Dr. B’s qualifications and why he thinks the way he does about chemicals [0:01:31]Today’s question: does Sorbitol contribute to tooth decay? [0:02:56]The web search results that Dr. B sees when he Googles “does Sorbitol cause tooth decay” [0:03:11]How an acid attack can cause tooth decay, and Sorbitol biochemistry after breakdown by the oral microbiome [0:05:35]Why Wikipedia can be a good source [0:06:31]What Sorbitol is made from, the chemical structure of it, and its metabolites [0:07:22]Failure to ferment Sorbitol: why Sorbitol is not digested by oral or gut microbes [0:09:36]How the Glycemic Index works [0:10:31]The forms of Sorbitol in use, and where to check this information [0:11:48] Why Dr. B likes Xylitol, another sugar alternative [0:15:14]Dr. B’s tips on what makes a good study [0:15:29]PubChem: what Dr. B’s favorite website says about Sorbitol [0:16:39]How to read articles that are behind paywalls: contact your dentist or doctor [0:19:52]Debunking false claims in the media: Sorbitol does not fight decay, while Xylitol does [0:20:17]How studying art history taught Dr. B to value primary sources [0:21:46]Concluding thoughts on Sorbitol, and other chemicals Dr. B is investigating [0:22:34]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Sorbitol on WikipediaInternational Sugar Organization'RHR: A Beginner’s Guide to Scientific Research'National Institutes of HealthPubChemSorbitol Metabolism/Metabolites on PubChem'D-Sorbitol on the Hazardous Substances Data Bank'Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a Quest
Jan 4 2022
28 mins
Should You Trust TikTok Dental Advice?
With the rise of social media, there has also been a rise in so-called clinical advice and home health hacks, many of which are harmful. Today, Dr. B addresses the issue of tooth shaving, and why it's a dangerous trend. We hear why the serrations (mamelons) at the edge of your teeth are actually a good thing, and what you can do instead of tooth shaving if you are unhappy with your smile. We dive into the dangers of tooth shaving and home remedies for dental bleaching, and why only horses should have their teeth shaved! Dr. B also gives some great tips on how to tell if the influencer you are listening to is giving good medical advice (hint: there won’t be any shocks!). As this is the last episode of Ask the Dentist for 2021, Dr. B also talks us through some of the exciting things coming our way in 2022. We end this episode (and the year) with Dr. B’s gratitude to all his listeners, and his well-wishes for a family-filled festive season: until next year!Key Points From This Episode:Welcome to the last podcast for 2021, and why Dr. B is so grateful for his listeners [0:00:15]Tooth shaving on TikTok: be wary of the clinical advice you get on social media [0:01:40]What tooth mamelons are and why they’re a good thing [0:03:21]Why an enameloplasty is better for you than shaving your teeth [0:04:07]Why horses can (and should) have their teeth shaved, but humans should not [0:04:49]The other topic to avoid on social media: tooth whitening [0:06:00]How to tell who to trust on social media [0:06:47]Why Dr. B is thankful to have a voice through this podcast [0:07:57]What’s coming in 2022: Dr. B’s business adventure, the ruling on the fluoridation of municipal water case, new techniques, and advice for preventative dental care [0:08:24]A wrap-up of today’s episode, and Dr. B’s wishes for all his listeners over the festive season [0:10:46]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:The Fluoride Action NetworkAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Dec 28 2021
14 mins
What To Do About a Tongue Thrust?
Did you know that a woodpecker’s tongue wraps all the way around its brain? In today’s episode, we’re talking all things tongues as Dr. B answers a listener’s question about tongue thrust! From the evolutionary reason for why a woodpecker’s tongue is like it is, to how a tongue thrust affects your face, breathing, talking, and so much more, this episode has it all! We dissect how the tongue functions normally and what leads to an abnormal position such as a tongue thrust. We are reminded of the importance of functional dentistry as Dr. B explains why getting braces to fix the results of a tongue thrust doesn’t fix the underlying issue, and how the swallow reflex works. Find out who you should turn to instead of your local dentist when given an absolute answer, how to check if you have a tongue thrust, and what you can do to fix it! We look forward to having you join us.Key Points From This Episode:Today’s question: what would Dr. B recommend for a tongue thrust? [0:01:45]Why our tongues are amazing and their role in oral and overall health. [0:02:27]Dr. B’s perception of the swallow reflex and the physics underlying it. [0:05:28]What happens in the mouth when the tongue is thrusting forwards. [0:06:49]Why a dentist’s absolute answer to being unable to fix a tongue thrust should be challenged. [0:07:28]How a tongue thrust can affect your health, [0:07:57]The root cause of a tongue thrust and how functional dentistry is important in addressing it. [0:09:03]Why Dr. B recommends that a myofunctional expert should be present at birth. [0:11:00] How to tell if you have a tongue thrust. [0:11:55]How a tongue thrust can be treated: behavioral retraining. [0:13:40]The role of myofunctional therapy in retraining your facial muscles. [0:15:28]Where to find a myofunctional therapist that Dr. B recommends. [0:16:56] Why the functional approach is the best. [0:17:41] Where to find a functional dentist. [0:18:47] How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Ask the Dentist: Tongue Tie (Ankyloglossia): Diagnosis, Symptoms, Surgery, and MoreAn Article About a Woodpecker’s TongueAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Dec 21 2021
20 mins
Are Honey and Maple Syrup OK for My Teeth?
For thousands of years, humans lived relatively sugar-free, with refined sugars not yet produced. However, in today's society, much of what we consume has been processed and sweetened. In this episode, Dr. B addresses the question of whether honey and maple syrup are ok to eat, and how they impact your teeth. The short answer is "no", however, there are nuances to everything in the body, and Dr. B gives some great tips on how to consume small quantities of sugar, safely. We hear why the myriad of "health benefits" to honey so widely publicized on the internet are not all they appear to be, and how you can wean yourself off sugar. We discuss how our ancestors lived, and why eating honey was probably not as bad for them as it is for us! From intermittent fasting to eating sweet things in one go, to Dr. B's very own microbiome-friendly omelet, don’t miss out on this sweet episode!Key Points From This Episode:An introduction to the root of all evil in dentistry: processed sugars [0:00:09]Today's question: Are honey and maple syrup considered sugar, and do they affect our oral microbiome the same way as refined sugars? [0:02:27]How honey is produced and processed, and why it can be good for you [0:04:00]Why sugar is bad for your teeth and how honey is slightly different from pure refined sugar [0:06:03]Why we don’t want to disinfect the mouth: causing dysbiosis [0:07:24]What dextran is and how honey can break it down [0:08:11]The difference between maple syrup and honey and how maple syrup affects your mouth [0:09:01]Dr. B’s advice for eating a healthy breakfast: the best diet for your teeth [0:11:00]How much sugar you can eat a day, and how often [0:13:07]Why our ancestors probably didn’t snack and what you can eat for breakfast [0:14:32] How the oral microbiome is regulated and how sugar disrupts this [0:15:46]Bad news for today’s questioner, Chrissy [0:16:56]How giving up sugar changed Dr. B’s tastes and health [0:17:11]The systemic issues with ingesting sugar [0:18:11]Conclusion: there are no shortcuts [0:19:27]Some tips on weaning yourself off sugar [0:20:19]Why you should never give infants honey [0:21:02] How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Dr. B's Microbiome OmeletAsk the Dentist: Collected Articles about SugarAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Dec 14 2021
25 mins
Is Lemon Water Bad for My Teeth?
Flavoring water with lemon juice has become the new rage, with people doing it for several reasons; from health benefits to making drinking water more palatable. However, lemon juice is acidic, and as we know from previous episodes with Dr. B, acid attacks in the mouth are bad for enamel! Tune in today to find out how you can safely enjoy your lemon-flavored water and other acidic drinks, where you can find a pH stick to find out exactly what it is that you are drinking, and why prevention is better than cure. We dive into the history and culture of people sucking on citrus fruits, and how this impacts your teeth. We also hear how other health conditions affect your enamel and are reminded how acid attacks work. Finally, Dr. B talks us through his feelings towards the coming winter. Press play now to find out more!Key Points From This Episode:What the Fall season means to Dr. B [0:00:10]An overview of today’s topic: “Is it okay to drink lemon water all day long?” [0:04:00] Why we drink lemon juice in the morning [0:05:06] How drinking lemon juice in the morning compared to drinking lemon water throughout the day affects your teeth differently [0:06:09]Why sucking on citrus will cause damage to your teeth [0:07:43]The cultural history of sucking on citrus fruits [0:08:30]Dr. B’s wife’s morning routine and how she drinks her lemon water safely [0:09:26]Drinking lemon juice throughout the day: flavored water versus fresh lemon juice [0:10:46]How to tell the pH of your drink and interpret these results [0:11:36]The process of acid attacks within the mouth and how they overlap with drinking an acidic beverage [0:12:19]Why prevention is the best thing to do for dental care [0:13:25]Know what you’re drinking: don’t assume that water is neutral [0:14:20]How to give your teeth the chance to re-mineralize [0:15:22]Situations that will dissolve enamel in months [0:16:11] How to snack safely throughout the day, and tips on getting kids to drink lemon water [0:19:16]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:The New Fat Flush PlanAsk the Dentist: Collected Articles on Acid AttacksAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Dec 7 2021
22 mins
Should My Child Get A Root Canal?
Many people shudder when they hear the term "root canal", so, unsurprisingly, there is an even greater fear around baby root canals. In today's episode, Dr. B addresses this fear by answering a question about the risks involved in baby root canals, and how they work. From his position of expertise, Dr. B talks us through why a root canal is a great option, and how a baby root canal is not all that different. He defines the difference between a pulpotomy and a pulpectomy in kids, and how each of these can and should be done. We find out why Dr. B stopped using formocresol, and what he and his functional dentist colleague, Dr. Staci Whitman, use instead. We learn about the anatomical differences between baby and adult teeth, and why it's so crucial to treat damaged baby teeth rather than to simply extract them. To find out more about the root cause of a root canal, tune in today!Key Points From This Episode:An introduction to today’s topic: talking about root canals on baby teeth [0:00:12]The question itself: ‘Are baby root canals the same as adult root canals in terms of any risks that they could run?’ [0:01:49]Comparing the baby root canal to the adult root canal [0:02:37]Why Dr. B stopped using formocresol in baby pulpotomies [0:03:25]The difference between an adult and a baby tooth root canal [0:04:17]How pulpectomies have changed over time: using an electrosurge and formocresol [0:07:19] Why formocresol can be harmful [0:09:11]What good dentists are now using instead of formocresol [0:09:56]Why Dr. B doesn’t believe the rumors about root canals being bad for you [0:10:26] Alternatives to a root canal in a kid and why these are not generally advised [0:11:06]When to find a new dentist [0:13:13]Other alternatives to formocresol [0:13:56]The wrap-up of the episode and why it’s important to ask questions [0:14:48]Why it’s best to see a functional dentist, and where you can find one [0:15:16] How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Root Cause Movie ReviewDo We Still Need Formocresol in Pediatric Dentistry?Clinical and Radiographic Success of Low-Level Laser Therapy Compared with Formocresol Pulpotomy Treatment in Primary MolarsAsk The Dentist Blog: New Study: Low-Level Laser Therapy Can Be as Effective as Formocresol In Saving Primary MolarsAsk The Dentist Blog: Root Cause Movie Review: Are Root Canals Killing Us?Dr. Staci Whitman's WebsiteDr. Staci Whitman on InstagramAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Nov 30 2021
19 mins
What About Porcelain Veneers?
Welcome back to Ask The Dentist, your dose of dental advice in a bite-sized podcast! Today Dr. B covers all things porcelain veneers: from what they are, to how they work, to whether or not they are necessary, and so much more! Tune in to hear Dr. B’s favorite story about giving a patient veneers, and how they changed this person’s life. We find out why it’s so important to make sure that you are getting veneers for the right reasons, and what the long-term consequences are. We discover the health benefits to veneers, and the costs involved in getting them. Dr. B also gives out some great advice on how to ensure that your dentist is the best person to give you veneers, and how to select the veneers that are right for you. For the dentists out there, Dr. B specifically addresses how to select veneers that are the best looking for each patient, as well as how to manage a patient’s expectations. Don’t miss out on this engaging episode!Key Points From This Episode:Welcome to the new listeners: what Ask The Dentist is all about, and where you can find more information [0:00:17]What a functional dentist is [0:01:08]Today's question: What does Dr. B feel about porcelain veneers, are they safe, and do they affect your health? [0:02:52]Dr. B's favorite case study of when porcelain veneers positively impacted a patient’s life [0:04:27]Why cosmetic dentistry is a miracle of modern dentistry [0:11:59]Dr. B’s opinion on the health impact of veneers: they are non-toxic and safe if done properly [0:13:56]The downsides of veneers: they are expensive and are a lifelong commitment [0:14:38]How a veneer works and the process behind getting them done [0:15:07]Tips on when you should be wary of a dentist doing veneers [0:16:53]How you can make sure that you are comfortable with the veneers before cementing [0:17:44]What to expect after getting veneers [0:18:37]Caveats to getting veneers and managing your expectations around them [0:19:08]The rare cases where insurance will cover a veneer [0:20:17]The dark side of Hollywood: cosmetic dentistry and the lengths actors will go to [0:20:52]What can go wrong with veneers and how to prevent these worst-case scenarios [0:22:10]How to choose the dentist to do your veneers and the veneers themselves [0:23:52]The key to a good veneer: the lab and the characterization [0:25:57]The importance of examining your motives for getting veneers as a patient, and case-selection on the dentist’s side [0:26:47]Why Dr. B loves doing veneers [0:30:48]The health benefits of cosmetic work [0:32:03]Composite veneers: a temporary fix [0:33:32]How to find your nearest functional dentist that can do cosmetic dentistry [0:35:53]How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Dental Accreditation: the London Dental InstituteAsk The Dentist: Collected Articles About VeneersAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Nov 23 2021
37 mins
Should You Brush Before or After Breakfast?
One of the first rituals a child is taught is to brush their teeth after breakfast. And up until 10 years ago, Dr. B was giving this same advice to patients. However, with the discovery of the oral microbiome, science is no longer pointing to this as best practice. Today Dr. B addresses the question “What is the benefit of brushing our teeth before or after our first meal of the day?” Tune in to hear how eating causes an acid wash within our mouths, and how brushing during this results in enamel demineralization. Find out the role of the oral microbiome in the production of acid following eating, and why disinfecting the mouth doesn’t work (and can even be harmful). Dr. B uses a simple analogy to describe the mechanical benefits of brushing and flossing in disrupting the biofilm and explains the pros and cons of the timing of your morning brushing. Listen in to find out why you should be changing your brushing habits!Key Points From This Episode:Why Dr. B’s answer to today’s question differs from his answer 15 years agoToday’s question: “What is the benefit of brushing our teeth before or after our first meal of the day?”How eating causes acid exposure in the mouthThe mechanism underlying tooth decay by acid washHow our understanding of this process has changed due to the discovery of the oral microbiomeWhy disinfecting the mouth doesn’t work, and is bad for youKeeping the oral microbiome commensal: brushing and flossing at the right timeHow the oral microbiome protects your teethWeeding the garden: an analogy for disrupting the biofilmHow the biofilm is affected by sleepWhy brushing right after eating can cause enamel damage by acid exposure and demineralization The two best times to brush your teeth in the morning: before eating or 30 minutes afterHow the mechanical action of brushing and flossing helps the oral microbiomeWhy brushing right after an unhealthy meal doesn’t undo the damageWhy you need to brush your teeth even if you don’t eat in the morningThe role of functional dentistry in changing the status quo and staying up to date with science How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Nov 16 2021
20 mins
Does Size Matter?
When NASA noticed astronauts were losing essential minerals in space, they started prescribing hydroxyapatite supplementation. A Japanese company picked up on this, and in the 1970s released a commercial toothpaste containing hydroxyapatite. Recently, a toothpaste brand in the USA has also jumped on the bandwagon, and today Dr. B answers two questions about why this is a great prospect! Tune in to hear how hydroxyapatite works on teeth (and bones), why it’s better than fluoride, and where you can find it. Dr. B breaks down complicated chemistry into a simple explanation that makes the benefits of hydroxyapatite clear. From whether nano- or micro-particles are better, to how the state of the mouth affects its efficacy, you don’t want to miss out on this educational episode! Join us today to get the details on two of Dr. B's favorite studies, why you shouldn't be concerned about absorbing hydroxyapatite, and so much more! Key Points From This Episode:An introduction to today’s questions: “What’s the natural size and shape of hydroxyapatite in our saliva, would having the most biomimetic size and shape in toothpaste make it more effective?”What biomimetic substances are, and why Dr. B supports themHow calcium is a building block of the bodyThe functions of essential nutrients like hydroxyapatiteWhat the difference is between nano and micro-sized particlesWhy both nano and micro-sized hydroxyapatite particles are safe for use: how they get broken down in the bodyThe history of calcium-phosphate based materials in human health and modern medicineHow hydroxyapatite was introduced into toothpaste: from NASA to SangiThe difference between fluoride and hydroxyapatite in enamel repairWhy hydroxyapatite nanoparticles are better than microparticles in toothpasteTwo of Dr. B’s favorite studies on hydroxyapatite in human healthHow to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Sangi co., ltd JapanThe Biomimetic Approach to Design Apatites for Nanobiotechnological ApplicationsNano-hydroxyapatite and its applications in preventive, restorative and regenerative dentistry: a review of literatureAsk the Dentist: Hydroxyapatite Toothpaste: What It Is, Benefits, & Best BrandsAsk the Dentist: Boka Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteKarex websiteFunctional Dentistry: Everything You Need to KnowThe future of dentistry is functional. Here’s WhyAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Nov 9 2021
29 mins
What's The Future of Functional Dentistry?
As a functional dentist, Dr. B is used to being asked what functional dentistry is. However, this week, this question comes with a twist as fans ask Dr. B what he is most excited about in functional dentistry. Tune in to discover Dr. B's journey to functional dentistry, from sleuthing as a child to setting up a directory globally for fellow functional dentists. Find out how functional dentistry ultimately saves lives and money, and why (despite this) the ADA doesn’t yet accept it as a specialization. We discuss diseases that functional dentistry can prevent, and Dr. B's book recommendations that cover functional topics. From nasal breathing to flat dental plates, Alzheimer’s disease to sleep apnoea, Dr. B takes us through his tips and research into the pathologies that he has applied to functional dentistry, to benefit his patients and family members. Join us to hear all this and more about the future of functional dentistry. Key Points From This Episode:Dr. B's weekend plans: why getting out from behind a screen post-vaccination is so importantWhy most people ask what functional dentistry isToday's question: what Dr. B is most excited about in functional dentistryHow Dr. Mark Hyman is an inspiration for functional practitionersWhat motivated Dr. B to become a functional dentistWorking upstream: how functional dentistry ultimately saves lives and moneyHow the body compensating causes pathology and why it’s important to intercept these compensations early onRecognizing functional dentists: one patient and one practitioner at a timeTeaching functional dentistry: learning beyond your official educationThe systems that interact to affect your dental healthBecoming a practitioner of the oral-microbiomeDr. B's "aha" moment about sleep apnea and prevention through dentistryThe oral-systemic connection: what happens in the mouth affects the bodyHow root cause thinking can save the entire healthcare system The importance of promoting nasal breathingUnderstanding the P. gingivalis bug and its link to Alzheimer’s diseaseWhy the future of dentistry is functionalFunctional dentistry throughout the world: From Brazil to JapanHow to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Functional Dentistry: Everything You Need to Know - Ask the DentistThe future of dentistry is functional. Here's why. - Ask the DentistDr. Mark Hyman on LinkedInBreath: The New Science of a Lost ArtAsk the Dentist: 5 Sleep Apnoea QuestionsCan gingivitis cause Alzheimer's Disease? [A Scientific Review]Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist DirectoryWhat Dr. B Recommends
Nov 2 2021
28 mins
What fixes pulpitis?
While many of us have experienced tooth pain, it seldom becomes fatal. This was not the case in the past, and world history would probably be vastly different if we had 21st-century dental care readily accessible across the ages. Welcome back to Ask the Dentist podcast, where today we ask Dr. Burhenne “what fixes pulpitis”? Tune in to find out what pulpitis is, why the pulp of the tooth is so important, and how it can lead to serious health issues if left untreated. Find out the difference between reversible and irreversible pulpitis (and how a crown can help either situation), and how to manage acute pulpitis. From a basic anatomy lesson on what teeth are made of and how they are formed, to a simple explanation of why tooth pain is something you don’t want to leave unchecked, don’t miss out on this fascinating episode! Key Points From This Episode:An introduction to today’s question: what fixes pulpitis?Diving back into dental school, the textbooks Dr. B keptFind out about the anatomy of a tooth, from pulp to dentinWhat the pulp consists of: nerves, blood vessels, lymph nodes, and odontoblastsHow a tooth is formed (dentinogenesis)The role of the pulp in repairing certain types of tooth damageWhat happens to the pulp as you ageThe function of the pulp: sensation, nutrition, infection prevention, and possibly even balance!How pulpitis occurs; how it causes tooth pain and why it can result in tooth deathThe difference between reversible and irreversible pulpitisWhy you should never wait to get tooth pain treatedHow a crown can prevent reversible pulpitis from becoming irreversible pulpitisWhy a crown is worth having even if the issue is irreversible pulpitisHow to manage acute pulpitisDr. B’s idea for a book: how tooth pain has shaped world historyHow to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Oct 26 2021
27 mins
The “F” Treatment?
Approximately eight percent of the annual USA dentistry budget is spent on Fluoride treatments for children. Tune in today to hear why Dr. B feels this isn't worth the cost, and what you can do to avoid your kid needing one! We hear what fluoride is, what products it's found in, and how we are exposed to it daily. Find out how it causes fluorosis, and how you can raise kids without exposing them to it. Dr. B also discusses two of his favorite studies that show that fluoride is absorbed through the mucous membranes and that "F" treatments are not cost-effective prevention methods. We learn what the future of dentistry holds and what “F” treatments will hopefully be replaced with. Discover why functional dentists are the key to managing your dental health without fluoride, and where you can find one today!Key Points From This Episode:How you can give Dr. B some constructive feedback on his Ask the Dentist podcastToday’s question: What are your thoughts on the “F” treatment for a 28-month-old?What the “F” treatment is: The fluoride treatmentWhy Dr. B doesn’t believe you should do the “F” treatmentWhat fluoride is, and why it’s in our waterHow toothpaste can cause fluorosisThe absorption of fluoride and how even showering in fluoridated water is a riskA study Dr. B recommends that showed “F” treatments were not cost-effective at preventing cavitiesWhy choosing a functional dentist is the best preventative measure against cavities How the dynamic nature of the tooth means you can influence its healthDr. B’s recommended toothpaste: Boka Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteWhy the field of dentistry needs a hydroxyapatite-based tooth varnishWhy it doesn’t matter how much hydroxyapatite is in your systemRaising your kids without fluoride: filtering water and changing toothpasteHow to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Email Dr. B your feedback at mark@askthedentist.comThe Dhru Purohit Podcast #207: The Dangers of Fluoride on the Brain and IQ with Dr. Mark BurhenneThe Fluoride Action NetworkAbsorption of fluoride through the oral mucosa of ratsCost-effectiveness analysis of two caries prevention methods in the first permanent molar in childrenProfessionally Applied Topical Fluoride and Restorative Care in Insured ChildrenBoka Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist DirectoryWhat Dr. B Recommends
Oct 19 2021
17 mins
Rinse or Spit After Brushing?
If you could raise your kid’s IQ by a couple of points, would you? In this episode, Dr. B reflects on how humanity is so focused on changing the future that we don’t consider how modifying our past and present behavior might have the same outcome. By using a hydroxyapatite-based toothpaste, you can prevent neurotoxicity in your kid, raising their IQ by the same number of points that gene therapy would lead to. However, using the right tools and products is no use if your protocol is wrong. Today, Dr. B addresses the question of whether to rinse or spit after brushing. The short answer is to spit but not rinse, however, there are a few caveats based on the time of day and the toothpaste you are using. Tune in to find out how hydroxyapatite toothpaste works on a molecular level, why saliva is useful when brushing, and how long to leave your toothpaste in your mouth. Don't miss out on this important information!Key Points From This Episode:How an article about reproductive technology got Dr. B thinking about raising your child’s IQ.The impact of fluoride on the developing brain.Why dentists don’t give enough information about brushing.Today’s topic: “Do you suggest rinsing out your mouth with water after brushing your teeth using Boka toothpaste?”Why we don’t get the benefits of brushing if our techniques are bad.The molecular mechanism underlying hydroxyapatite toothpaste.Why people under the age of 20 should not swallow fluoride-based toothpaste. How to brush using hydroxyapatite toothpaste: don’t rinse with water.Why NASA developed hydroxyapatite toothpaste.When to wet your toothbrush.The difference in tooth structure from fluoride- or hydroxyapatite-based repair.Timing when brushing your teeth: leaving hydroxyapatite in saliva for 30 minutes.What Dr. B wishes he’d learned in dental school, and why clinical practice lags behind science.How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:The Wall Street Journal: Imagine a Future Without SexBoka Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteRiseWell Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteAsk the Dentist: Hydroxyapatite Toothpaste: What It Is, Benefits, & Best BrandsAsk the Dentist: Collected Articles on Hydroxyapatite ToothpasteClinpro 5000 ToothpasteAsk the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Oct 12 2021
15 mins
What's a good protocol, products, and tools for kids aged four-12?
Forming good dental habits with kids can be like pulling teeth. To address this issue, today Dr. B answers the question, "What's a good protocol, products, and tools for kids aged four-12?" Surprisingly, the products and tools are less important than the protocol, however, Dr. B still gives some good recommendations for all three! Tune in to hear why you should be using Myotape if your kid is mouth breathing, and what products to buy to ensure that if they need to brush at school, it is as easy as possible. From throwing out your mouthwash to which toothpaste to use, this episode has it all! Join us as we hear why the protocol is more important than both the products and the tools used, and what this encompasses. From diet to timing to technique, Dr. B provides a wealth of advice and practical tips that you can put into use today. You don’t want to miss this entertaining episode filled with tips to help you give your kid a healthier smile. Key Points From This Episode:Brushing your kid's teeth: "What's a good protocol, products, and tools for kids aged four-12?"Why Dr. B will split his advice from kids aged four to eight-year-olds, and eight to 12 year-oldsWhy protocol is more important than the products or tools usedBreaking down the products: throw out your mouthwash and fluoride-based toothpaste and buy hydroxyapatite-based toothpaste insteadFind out which toothpaste brands will make the differenceWhy you should be using Myotape to prevent mouth breathingProtocol: from technique to timingMotivating kids to brush their teeth: modeling the behaviorWhy you should supervise your kid’s brushing until the age of 10How to give your kids the power to control their teeth-cleaning behaviorDiscussing diet and how this affects their brushing routineTips for how and when a kid should brush at schoolTwo things Dr. B feels you should read about: the dental diet and vitamin K2Choosing a functional dentist to help your kids form good habits How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:The Fluoride Action NetworkRisewell Toothpaste for KidsBoka Coco Ginger Flavored ToothpasteMyotape websiteThe Oxygen Advantage: Simple, Scientifically Proven Breathing Techniques to Help You Become Healthier, Slimmer, Faster, and FitterThe Breathing Cure: Develop New Habits for a Healthier, Happier, and Longer LifeClose Your Mouth: Buteyko Clinic Handbook for Perfect HealthRadius websiteThe Dental Diet: The Surprising Link between Your Teeth, Real Food, and Life-Changing Natural Health
Oct 5 2021
33 mins
How Long Should You Wait After Brushing?
Most of us have been taught to brush, spit, and rinse after meals. Tune in today to find out why this is not necessarily what Dr. B recommends! From the time of day to the type of toothpaste (fluoride or hydroxyapatite-based), to your age, Dr. B explains how each of these aspects can impact your dental health. We discover the molecular mechanism underlying how fluoride remineralizes teeth and why it’s dangerous for kids to swallow, but not adults. Dr. B provides a wealth of information about the invention of the first toothbrush before World War II, when fluoride was introduced into toothpaste, and what the purpose of plaque is, as well as how the type of food we eat affects it. He also shares his daily brushing routine and what you can do to improve yours. Don’t miss out on this educational episode, and don’t forget your homework for next week!Key Points From This Episode:When to brush: Should you be rinsing after you brush your teeth, or should you be waiting after using your fluoridated toothpaste? How the pH in your mouth is affected by the food you eat.Why fluoride should be on your teeth for as long as possible, but not in your body.Waiting 30 to 40 minutes after eating before brushing to allow for remineralization.How the biofilm is affected by brushing.The protective role of plaque and the biofilm.The impact of sugary and processed food on the biofilm.When and why the toothbrush was invented.The addition of fluoride to toothpaste and how it remineralizes teeth on a molecular level.Why children need to spit and rinse fluoride-based toothpaste, but adults do not.Why you don’t need to rinse when using hydroxyapatite-based toothpaste.How brushing straight after eating removes the calcium slurry from your teeth.Your homework for the week: Which does Dr. B do first, floss or brush?How to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentistLinks Mentioned in Today’s Episode:'Ask the Dentist: Boka Hydroxyapatite Toothpaste''Ask the Dentist: Should you floss before or after brushing?'Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist Directory
Sep 28 2021
17 mins
Can Breastfeeding Give my Child Cavities?
As the parent of a young child, there is a lot of internal and external pressure to give them the best possible start in life. But what if it’s not always clear whether something will have a positive or negative impact? Our question this week comes from Anna, a lactation consultant who is concerned over the correlation she has seen between breastfeeding moms and cavities in young children. In today’s episode, we hear from Dr. B about the benefits of breastfeeding, why it does not cause cavities, and what other factors in your child’s life might be causing cavities. We also discuss how a vaginal birth can influence a child’s oral microbiome and why infant formula is likely to cause cavities. Later, Dr. B shares how to institute positive habits that will benefit your child’s microbiome and why it's so beneficial. For all this and much more, tune in today!Key Points From This Episode:Introducing today’s topic on whether breastfeeding can cause cavities in childrenWhy breastmilk does not cause cavities, as it is not cariogenicHow your method of birth can have an impact on your child’s oral microbiomeThe study of breastfeeding for more than 40 days and how it affects your childThe link between breastfeeding and facial developmentWhy using formula can cause tooth decayHow the condition of the mother before birth plays a role in the child’s healthHow a vaginal birth assists your child’s microbiomeWhy breastmilk is the ideal method for culturing a child’s microbiomeSome of the factors that cause tooth decay in humans versus other mammalsWhy it’s important to minimize saliva sharing activities like sharing a toothbrushSnacks: it’s not about the quantity of the snack, but the frequency of the snackDr. B’s advice for preventing cavities by teaching children proper oral care habitsWhy it’s good to take your child to see a dentist from as early as six monthsHow to Submit Your Question:Record your question for Dr. B at speakpipe.com/askthedentist Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:Ask the DentistAbout Dr. Mark BurhenneFollow Dr. B on Instagram @askthedentistFollow Dr. B on Twitter @askthedentistAsk Dr. B a QuestionFunctional Dentist DirectoryBokaRisewell
Sep 21 2021
24 mins
How Does Oral Microbiome Affect Gum Health?

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