PODCAST

fiction/non/fiction

fiction/non/fiction

Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

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S5 Ep. 30: The Literature of Star Wars: Van Lathan Jr. on How American Life Shapes and Is Shaped by a Galaxy Far, Far Away
Yesterday
S5 Ep. 30: The Literature of Star Wars: Van Lathan Jr. on How American Life Shapes and Is Shaped by a Galaxy Far, Far Away
Podcaster and writer Van Lathan Jr. joins Fiction/Non/Fiction host Whitney Terrell to talk about growing up a Star Wars fan and continuing to think and talk about the franchise as a co-host of The Ringer podcast. He discusses the enduring qualities of the universe, the continuing relevance of the characters, and how the story intersects with American politics and literature. He also talks about and reads from his new book, Fat, Crazy, and Tired: Tales from the Trenches of Transformation. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Van Lathan Jr. ●    Fat, Crazy, and Tired: Tales From the Trenches of Transformation ●    The Midnight Boys ●    Higher Learning ●    The Ringer ●    The Red Pill ●    Two Distant Strangers ●    Hip Hop Homicides   Others: ●    George Lucas ●    Kathleen Kennedy ●    Deborah Chow ●    Octavia Butler ●    Starwars.com ●    Superman ●    Buzz Lightyear   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 30: The Literature of Star Wars: Van Lathan Jr. on How American Life Shapes and Is Shaped by a Galaxy Far, Far Away
Yesterday
S5 Ep. 30: The Literature of Star Wars: Van Lathan Jr. on How American Life Shapes and Is Shaped by a Galaxy Far, Far Away
Podcaster and writer Van Lathan Jr. joins Fiction/Non/Fiction host Whitney Terrell to talk about growing up a Star Wars fan and continuing to think and talk about the franchise as a co-host of The Ringer podcast. He discusses the enduring qualities of the universe, the continuing relevance of the characters, and how the story intersects with American politics and literature. He also talks about and reads from his new book, Fat, Crazy, and Tired: Tales from the Trenches of Transformation. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Van Lathan Jr. ●    Fat, Crazy, and Tired: Tales From the Trenches of Transformation ●    The Midnight Boys ●    Higher Learning ●    The Ringer ●    The Red Pill ●    Two Distant Strangers ●    Hip Hop Homicides   Others: ●    George Lucas ●    Kathleen Kennedy ●    Deborah Chow ●    Octavia Butler ●    Starwars.com ●    Superman ●    Buzz Lightyear   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 28: The Prose Version of That Blue Steel Look From Zoolander: V.V. Ganeshananthan Dishes on Blurbs, Jacket Copy, Cover Art, and All the Dark Arts of Publishing a Book
Jun 16 2022
S5 Ep. 28: The Prose Version of That Blue Steel Look From Zoolander: V.V. Ganeshananthan Dishes on Blurbs, Jacket Copy, Cover Art, and All the Dark Arts of Publishing a Book
Novelist and Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-host V.V. Ganeshananthan talks to co-host Whitney Terrell about what happens to a book between writing and publication. Ganeshananthan’s second novel, Brotherless Night, about a young woman in the early years of Sri Lanka’s decades-long civil war, will be released by Random House in January of 2023. Ganeshananthan describes the editorial process, selecting and approaching other writers about writing blurbs, selecting jacket art, and writing cover copy.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: V.V. Ganeshananthan Brotherless Night  Love Marriage Others: Celeste Ng Sara Nović Brit Bennett Danielle Evans Marilynne Robinson Ann Patchett Emily Barton Jonathan Escoffery Thomas Pynchon Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Rick Riordan Granta New York Observer “Bartleby, the Scrivener” The Land Before Time Reese Witherspoon Book Club Zoolander Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom “Writers, Protect Your Inner Life,” by Lan Samantha Chang, Literary Hub, August 7, 2017 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 27: ‘Gun Violence Has Traumatized All of Us’: Amye Archer on the Long History of Mass Shootings
Jun 9 2022
S5 Ep. 27: ‘Gun Violence Has Traumatized All of Us’: Amye Archer on the Long History of Mass Shootings
Writer and educator Amye Archer joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss her 2019 anthology, If I Don't Make It, I Love You: Survivors in the Aftermath of School Shootings, co-edited with Loren Kleinman. Archer explains how hearing the heartbreaking details of loss can prevent us from glossing over the staggering trauma of these events. Archer also reads from the anthology’s section on the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, and questions why, as a nation, we haven’t changed the Second Amendment in response to modern weapons.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Amye Archer  If I Don't Make It, I Love You: Survivors in the Aftermath of School Shootings (pre-order paperback) “Holding the Pain,” Longreads, July 2019 Others: Gun Violence Archive “What to Know About the School Shooting in Uvalde, Texas,” | The New York Times | May 30, 2022 “Medical Worker Rushed to Escape 'Labyrinth' of Offices in Tulsa,” by Alex Traub | The New York Times | June 2, 2022 “Gunman Kills 10 at Buffalo Supermarket in Racist Attack,” | The New York Times | May 17, 2022  “California Church Shooting Was 'Hate Incident,' Sheriff Says,” by Livia Albeck-Ripka, Shawn Hubler and Eduardo Medina | The New York Times | May 16, 2022 Full Transcript: Biden's Speech on Gun Control - The New York Times  “From Sandy Hook to Uvalde, the Violent Images Never Seen,” by Elizabeth Williamson | The New York Times | May 30, 2022 “For Uvalde, Caskets Adorned in Childhood Dreams,” by Emily Rhyne and Mark Abramson | The New York Times | June 2, 2022 “The Fourth State of Matter,” by Jo Ann Beard | The New Yorker, June 17, 1996 Elephant (2003) dir. Gus Van Sant “Gun Violence, #NeverAgain and the Power of Teenage Protest,” Jim Shepard and Danielle Evans, Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1, Episode 12 New York Times Sunday Review tweet of gun violence graphic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 26: ‘Let Me Say It With All My Heart: This is Such Bullshit’: Shelly Oria and Kristen Arnett on the Reproductive Rights Crisis
Jun 2 2022
S5 Ep. 26: ‘Let Me Say It With All My Heart: This is Such Bullshit’: Shelly Oria and Kristen Arnett on the Reproductive Rights Crisis
Editor and writer Shelly Oria and novelist Kristen Arnett join co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the reproductive rights crisis through the lens of art, specifically through the stories, plays, essays and poems that comprise McSweeney’s new anthology, I Know What’s Best for You, edited by Oria. In the wake of the leaked Supreme Court draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, the conversation teases out how, through art, charged political issues like abortion take on a specificity that they don’t in basic reporting or debate. The writers speak about misinformation and crisis pregnancy centers, as well as what a post-Roe future might hold. Arnett reads from her story, “The Babies,” and Oria reads from hers, “We Bled All Winter.” To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Shelly Oria I Know What’s Best for You: Stories on Reproductive Freedom Indelible in the Hippocampus: Writings from the Me Too Movement New York 1, Tel Aviv 0 Kristen Arnett With Teeth Mostly Dead Things Felt in the Jaw Others: “Key Passages from the Leaked Supreme Court Draft Opinion”, Maria Cramer “CNN Poll: The Supreme Court’s draft opinion on Roe v. Wade hasn’t shaken the mid-term landscape”, Jennifer Agiesta and Ariel Edwards-Levy The Brigid Alliance Select contributors: R.O. Kwon Deborah Landau Deb Olin Unferth Rachel Eliza Griffiths Donnetta Lavinia Grays Hannah Lillith Assadi Alison Espach Tommy Orange Riva Lehrer Cade Leebron Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 25: A Change of Fortune: Sunila Galappatti on the #GotaGoHome Protests in Sri Lanka
May 26 2022
S5 Ep. 25: A Change of Fortune: Sunila Galappatti on the #GotaGoHome Protests in Sri Lanka
Editor, dramaturg, and author Sunila Galappatti joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss why protesters across Sri Lanka are calling for the resignation of their once-popular president, Gotabaya “Gota” Rajapaksa. Galappatti reads from her recent article in The Hindu about what the protests look like firsthand, and also talks about how brutal economic conditions are driving people of different class and ethnic backgrounds—including Gota’s primarily Sinhalese base—to unite in unexpected ways; the growing space for critical political speech; and what the international media is missing about the protests. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Sunila Galappatti A Long Watch: War, Captivity and Return in Sri Lanka “Seeking Refuge in ‘GotaGoGama’ – a Partial Journal of Protest,” The Hindu, May 16, 2022  Others: “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell Capital by Rana Dasgupta “Majoritarianism and Minorities in Asia,” Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1, Episode 13 John Peel: Margrave of the Marshes by John Peel, Sheila Ravenscroft, and Jack White Mueller Report Himal Southasian podcast Meera Srinivasan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 24: Live from Unbound: Steve Paul and Henry Schvey on How Evan S. Connell and Tennessee Williams Never Really Left Missouri
May 19 2022
S5 Ep. 24: Live from Unbound: Steve Paul and Henry Schvey on How Evan S. Connell and Tennessee Williams Never Really Left Missouri
Journalist and biographer Steve Paul and writer and Washington University professor Henry Schvey join host Whitney Terrell live from the Unbound Book Festival in Columbia, Missouri, to discuss their books on novelist Evan S. Connell and Tennessee Williams, respectively. Each of the old masters was from Missouri—Connell from Kansas City and Williams from St. Louis. Paul and Schvey talk about how, though neither man was happy about his city of origin, those locations factored importantly into their work. Finally, they take questions from the live audience at Unbound.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Steve Paul Hemingway at Eighteen Literary Alchemist: The Writing Life of Evan S. Connell Henry Schvey Blue Song Others Tennessee Williams Ernest Hemingway Mrs. Bridge, Evan S. Connell Mr. Bridge, Connell The Patriot, Connell Son of the Morningstar, Connell The Diary of a Rapist, Connell The Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire, Williams Night of the Iguana, Williams Anne Lamott Paris Review Max Steele The New Republic Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (film) Wallace Stegner Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 23: The Brothers Chao: Lan Samantha Chang on Food, Family, and New Ways of Imagining Asian American Narratives
May 12 2022
S5 Ep. 23: The Brothers Chao: Lan Samantha Chang on Food, Family, and New Ways of Imagining Asian American Narratives
Novelist and Iowa Writers’ Workshop director Lan Samantha Chang joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss her new novel, The Family Chao, an homage to The Brothers Karamazov centered on the title family’s Midwestern Chinese restaurant. Chang talks about how the three brothers of her story and their varied relationships to identity reflect their parents’ changing circumstances. She also discusses how Asian American and immigrant narratives are evolving to reflect new generations; Asian American life in the Midwest; using humor to subvert cliches; and how directing the Workshop has altered her approach to writing. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Lan Samantha Chang The Family Chao Hunger Inheritance All is Forgotten, Nothing is Lost  Others The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky Number One Chinese Restaurant, Lillian Li Babette’s Feast, Isak Dinesen Little Fires Everywhere, Celeste Ng Anita Mannur Frank Conroy Peter Ho Davies James Alan McPherson Iowa Writers’ Workshop The Connie Brothers Era: 45 Years at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 3, Episode 2 Is College Education a Right or a Privilege?, Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1, Episode 5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 22: Live from Unbound: Alex George on the ‘Absolutely Extraordinary Journey’ of Running a Book Festival
May 5 2022
S5 Ep. 22: Live from Unbound: Alex George on the ‘Absolutely Extraordinary Journey’ of Running a Book Festival
Novelist, Skylark Bookshop owner, and Unbound Book Festival organizer Alex George joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell live from the festival in Columbia, Missouri, to discuss what’s harder, writing a novel or running a bookfest – or doing both and continuing his (other) day job as an attorney. It turns out that doing all of the above is difficult, but so rewarding that George wouldn’t have it any other way. George also reads from his 2020 novel The Paris Hours, an Indie Next Book of the Month selection and Amazon Best Book of the Month, and discusses the merits of living in Columbia’s literary community. Finally, he takes questions from the live audience at Unbound.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Alex George The Paris Hours Setting Free the Kites A Good American skylark bookshop Others Tennessee Williams Garth Greenwell Intimate Contact: Garth Greenwell on Book Bans and Writing about Sex, Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 5, Episode 12 Zadie Smith George Saunders Salman Rushdie Michael Ondaatje A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway Maurice Ravel Marc Chagall Igor Stravinsky Coco Chanel Gertrude Stein James Joyce Donald Barthelme Josephine Baker Marcel Proust Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 21: Live from Unbound: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah and Sequoia Nagamatsu on Affirming and Subverting Pop Culture in Fiction
Apr 28 2022
S5 Ep. 21: Live from Unbound: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah and Sequoia Nagamatsu on Affirming and Subverting Pop Culture in Fiction
Fiction writers Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah and Sequoia Nagamatsu join hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell live from the Unbound Book Festival in Columbia, Missouri, where they talk about pop culture in the literary sphere, the blurring of the line between literary and popular fiction, and subverting tropes within their genres (plus, a bit of Frasier fanfiction). Nana reads from his short story collection Friday Black, and Sequoia reads from his novel How High We Go in the Dark. The two also take questions from the live audience at Unbound.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf, Carter Groves, Brooke Spalding-Ford, Shannon Moran, Maria Starns, and Kayla Wiltfong. Selected readings for the episode:  Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah  Friday Black Sequoia Nagamatsu  How High We Go in the Dark Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone "Elegy Hotel" by Sequoia Nagamatsu, print and audio, The Southern Review Others Race in American Science Fiction Star Trek Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra T-shirt  Sony Aibo Servant Trailer Star Trek: The Chase Monologue  “The Origins of Directed Panspermia” | Scientific American 2K Games Final Fantasy Madden Deathloop Panic! at the Disco Pearl Jam Ebenezer Scrooge, A Christmas Carol The Orville Blade Runner Big Hero 6: The Series Avatar: The Last Airbender  Frasier Groundhog Day Edge of Tomorrow  Attack on Titan Bel-Air The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Palm Springs Dragon Ball Z Viet Thanh Nguyen  TVtropes.org George and Paula Saunders Talk Empathy and the 2020 Democratic Candidates Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 2, Episode 16 Marlon James and Daniel José Older: Against Genre Snobbery Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 2, Episode 17 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 20: ‘A Spiritual-Industrial Complex’: SJ Sindu on Writing the Life of a Child God
Apr 21 2022
S5 Ep. 20: ‘A Spiritual-Industrial Complex’: SJ Sindu on Writing the Life of a Child God
Novelist SJ Sindu joins host V.V. Ganeshananthan live from the Tamil Worlds Initiative at the University of Toronto-Scarborough to discuss her new novel, Blue-Skinned Gods, and its protagonist, Kalki, a blue-skinned boy raised in an ashram as the tenth human incarnation of Vishnu. Sindu talks about depicting caste, gender, and heteronormative privilege within a rigid community; the destructive intersection of spirituality and capitalism; and how the age of digital misinformation has aided the Hindu right’s attempt to redefine South Asian history.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf and Hannah Ward.  Selected readings for the episode:  SJ Sindu Dominant Genes Blue-Skinned Gods Marriage of a Thousand Lies I Once Met You But You Were Dead Others Funny Boy by Shyam Selvadurai Tamil Worlds Initiative at the University of Toronto-Scarborough “Where Countries are Tinderboxes and Facebook is a Match,” New York Times, April 21, 2018 The Awakening by Kate Chopin Marrying for a Future by Sidharthan Maunaguru The marriages in-between - Himal Southasian A review of Sidharthan Maunaguru’s Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War by V.V. Ganeshananthan | Jan 29, 2020 Garrard Conley and SJ Sindu on the Mainstreaming of Queer Identity, Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 1, Episode 26 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 18: ‘Unlivable and Untenable’: Molly McGhee on the Punishing Life of Junior Publishing Employees
Apr 7 2022
S5 Ep. 18: ‘Unlivable and Untenable’: Molly McGhee on the Punishing Life of Junior Publishing Employees
Fiction writer and former Tor assistant editor Molly McGhee joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss details of her recent resignation from a position she’d fought for in the industry she loves. She also talks about what’s behind #PublishingBurnout for junior employees and what that means for the future of publishing. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected readings for the episode:  Molly McGhee Paris Review - America's Dead Souls Others: When Will Publishing Stop Starving Its Young? - The New York Times Editorial Resignations At Big Houses Spark Reckoning - Publishers Lunch 147—Publishing's Great Resignation (Print Run podcast) A Woman's Life in Publishing - JSTOR Daily Where Is the Diversity in Publishing? The 2019 Diversity Baseline Survey Results | Lee & Low Blog Women in The Gentleman's Career of Publishing | Princeton University Press Literary Color Lines: On Inclusion in Publishing Season 5 Episode 10: “How on Earth Do You Judge Books?” Susan Choi and Oscar Villalon on the Story Behind Literary Awards Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 17: ‘We’re There to Bear Witness’: Putsata Reang on Reporting in War Zones
Mar 31 2022
S5 Ep. 17: ‘We’re There to Bear Witness’: Putsata Reang on Reporting in War Zones
Author and journalist Putsata Reang joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss the dangers faced by foreign correspondents and local journalists during times of violent crisis. Reang talks about the dangers reporters are facing in Ukraine, recalls training journalists in Afghanistan, and reads from her forthcoming book Ma and Me: A Memoir. She also reflects on how her experiences in journalism connect to her history as a Cambodian refugee and her identity as a gay woman. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected readings for the episode: Putsata Reang Ma and Me: A Memoir Opinion | My Family Fled Cambodia as the Americans Evacuated. Here's What I Hope for Afghan Refugees.- POLITICO At Sea, and Seeking a Safe Harbor - The New York Times Full Circle: Two journalists return to their native countries to help other journalists express dissent — Oregon Humanities (with Kim Oanh Nguyen) Others When the War is Over: Cambodia And The Khmer Rouge Revolution by Elizabeth Becker “Iraq War and News Media: A Look Inside the Death Toll” by Frank Smyth, Committee to Protect Journalists, March 18, 2013 "The Iraq War: The Heaviest Death Toll for the Media" Since World War II, March 2003 – August 2010 by Reporters Without Borders’ Middle East Desk, September 7, 2010 - Updated on January 20, 2016 “Ukrainian Family’s Dash for Safety Ends in Death” by Lynsey Addario and Andrew E. Kramer, The New York Times, March 7, 2022 “American veterans train Ukrainian volunteers in combat” CNN Excerpt of interview with NYT's Lynsey Addario by Norah O'Donnell of CBS Evening News (via Twitter) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 16: ‘One of the Worst Places on Earth’: Mansoor Adayfi on the 20th Anniversary of Guantánamo Bay Prison
Mar 24 2022
S5 Ep. 16: ‘One of the Worst Places on Earth’: Mansoor Adayfi on the 20th Anniversary of Guantánamo Bay Prison
Author and former Guantánamo detainee Mansoor Adayfi joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss his 14 years of systematic torture in the military prison. Adayfi reads from his memoir, Don’t Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantánamo; recalls being ambushed, kidnapped, and sold to the U.S. by warlords; and explains the hunger strikes and protests he and other detainees participated in in defense of their lives and rights. Adayfi, who was ultimately found innocent and released, urges President Biden to work toward closing Guantánamo, which he describes as a place of lawlessness, oppression and injustice. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected readings for the episode: Mansoor Adayfi Don’t Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantánamo "An Open Letter to President Biden About Guantánamo" by Mansoor Adayfi, et al., The New York Review of Books, Jan. 29, 2021  Opinion | In Our Prison on the Sea - The New York Times, Sept. 15, 2017 Others Guantanamo Reports (Seton Hall University) Guantánamo Bay Detention Camp | American Civil Liberties Union  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 15: ‘Forget What You Know About War’: Scott Anderson on What Russia’s Wars in Chechnya Tell Us About the Invasion of Ukraine
Mar 17 2022
S5 Ep. 15: ‘Forget What You Know About War’: Scott Anderson on What Russia’s Wars in Chechnya Tell Us About the Invasion of Ukraine
Veteran war correspondent Scott Anderson joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to discuss his time reporting in Chechnya. Anderson compares the First and Second Chechen Wars to Putin’s invasion of Ukraine. He also reads from his nonfiction book, The Man Who Tried to Save the World, and talks about how he overcame efforts to quash a magazine article he wrote that was critical of Putin, as well as why Chechnya’s conflict was scary enough to leave him with a streak of white hair.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected readings for the episode: Scott Anderson The Man Who Tried to Save the World Midnight Hotel Triage The Four O’Clock Murders Fractured Lands The Quiet Americans  None Dare Call It a Conspiracy Lawrence in Arabia  Others A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra Raiders of the Lost Ark  “Death of the Tiger,” by Jon Lee Anderson, The New Yorker, Jan. 17, 2011. No Innocents Abroad: Scott Anderson and Andrew Altschul on the CIA and U.S. Provocateurs in Foreign Politics, Fiction/Non/Fiction, Season 3, Episode 25 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 13: Censoring the American Canon: Farah Jasmine Griffin on Book Bans Targeting Black Writers
Mar 3 2022
S5 Ep. 13: Censoring the American Canon: Farah Jasmine Griffin on Book Bans Targeting Black Writers
Acclaimed writer and professor Farah Jasmine Griffin joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to talk about why book bans so often target the power of Black literature. Griffin discusses the censorship of Black authors like Toni Morrison as well as communities’ efforts to preserve and share Black stories when schools won’t. Author of Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature, Griffin discusses how her own exposure to Black authors like Morrison and James Baldwin came largely from her own father, outside of the classroom.  To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Farah Jasmine Griffin Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature  “Banning Toni Morrison’s books doesn’t protect kids. It just sanitizes racism.” | The Washington Post Who Set You Flowin?: The African American Migration Narrative Others: The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison “Missouri school district bans Toni Morrison’s ‘The Bluest Eye’” | Today Ralph Ellison “The Little Man at Chehaw Station” and “The Novel as a Function of American Democracy” by Ralph Ellison from Going to the Territory Beloved by Toni Morrison Toni Morrison James Baldwin If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin The 1619 Project Nikole Hannah-Jones Adam Serwer on Critical Race Theory and the Very American Fear of Owning Up to Our Racist Past and Present Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 4, Episode 20 Angela Davis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S5 Ep. 12: Intimate Contact: Garth Greenwell on Book Bans and Writing About Sex
Feb 24 2022
S5 Ep. 12: Intimate Contact: Garth Greenwell on Book Bans and Writing About Sex
Acclaimed novelist Garth Greenwell joins co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell to talk about book banning, writing about sex, and the different (and often coded) reasons people talk about limits to reading. A former high school teacher, Greenwell discusses the ideological roots of book bans targeting Black and LGBTQIA+ writers and describes how books like Giovanni’s Room gave him hope and inspiration as an isolated queer teenager in the South. Finally, he talks about the need for generosity and patience in this debate and why we should all be willing to have hard conversations about what is, and is not, appropriate reading material for students. To hear the full episode, subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Check out video versions of our interviews on the Fiction/Non/Fiction Instagram account, the Fiction/Non/Fiction YouTube Channel, and our show website: podcast is produced by Anne Kniggendorf. Selected Readings: Garth Greenwell Kink, edited with R.O. Kwon Cleanness What Belongs to You Others: The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison All Boys Aren’t Blue by George Matthew Johnson Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado 'Banning My Book Won’t Protect Your Child,' by Carmen Maria Machado, The New York Times  Carmen Maria Machado Edinburgh by Alexander Chee Another Country by James Baldwin Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin Just Above My Head by James Baldwin Anonymous Sex eds. Hillary Jordan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters Skinned Alive by Edmund White Edmund White and Emily Temple on Literary Feuds, Social Media, and Our Appetite for Drama Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 2, Episode 4 R.O. Kwon and Paul Harding Talk God and Faith in American Fiction Fiction/Non/Fiction Season 2, Episode 9 A Streetcar Named Desire dir. Elia Kazan Judy Blume: 'I thought, this is America: we don't ban books. But then we did' Children and teenagers, The Guardian Brontez Purnell Ocean Vuong “Why book banning is back” | Vox “A Texas lawmaker is targeting 850 books that he says could make students feel uneasy” | NPR Cleanness | Work in Progress Garth Greenwell & Mitzi Angel on Writing About Sex Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices