The 7investing Podcast

7investing

Welcome to 7investing.com. Our mission is to empower you to invest in your future. This podcast brings our market-based experts together to discuss our investing process and important news. Once a month, we will also feature interviews with some of the best minds in business and investing. Check out 7investing.com to find more of our free content and premium monthly stock recommendations. read less
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Episodes

Tesla "The Car Company" is Worth $104 Per Share. Here's Why.
May 21 2024
Tesla "The Car Company" is Worth $104 Per Share. Here's Why.
Tesla (Nasdaq: TSLA) is one of the market’s most unique battleground stocks. People either love it or they hate it, the financial media's commentary is either euphoric or miserable, and institutional price targets have ranged everywhere from $10 to $2,000. For the past two weeks, 7investing CEO Simon Erickson has been building a very detailed discounted cash flow for Tesla. He's put all emotions (and social interaction) aside and has let the numbers do the talking -- to develop his most-likely estimate of Tesla's future revenues, operating costs, and capital expenses through the year 2040. Furthermore, a large part of the Tesla equation lies in the optionality offered by its visionary (and yet eccentric) CEO Elon Musk. Musk has several options of where he could lead Tesla into its future, including full self-driving software subscriptions, autonomous commercial trucks, an on-demand Robotaxi network, or a thousand other AI-based projects. Yet even with so many potential destinations, the Tesla we know today is still primarily a car company. 92% of its revenue currently comes from selling, leasing, and servicing battery-powered electric vehicles. IN THIS PART 1 OF 2, Simon describes how he came up with an estimate of $104 per share for Tesla as a car company. The company is aggressively building Gigafactories and ramping up the production of new models, but is also constrained on pricing and by rising competition in China. Disclosure: Options are not suitable for all investors and carry significant risk. Option investors can rapidly lose the value of their investment in a short period of time and incur permanent loss by expiration date. Certain complex options strategies carry additional risk. There are additional costs associated with option strategies that call for multiple purchases and sales of options, such as spreads, straddles, among others, as compared with a single option trade. Prior to buying or selling an option, investors must read and understand the “Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options”, also known as the options disclosure document (ODD) which can be found at: www.theocc.com/company-information/documents-and-archives/options-disclosure-documentSupporting documentation for any claims will be furnished upon request. If you are enrolled in our Options Order Flow Rebate Program, The exact rebate will depend on the specifics of each transaction and will be previewed for you prior to submitting each trade. This rebate will be deducted from your cost to place the trade and will be reflected on your trade confirmation. Order flow rebates are not available for non-options transactions. To learn more, see our Fee Schedule, Order Flow Rebate FAQ, and Order Flow Rebate Program Terms & Conditions.Options can be risky and are not suitable for all investors. See the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options to learn more.All investing involves the risk of loss, including loss of principal. Brokerage services for US-listed, registered securities, options and bonds in a self-directed account are offered by Open to the Public Investing, Inc., member FINRA & SIPC. See public.com/#disclosures-main for more information.
CROX | AEO | AVGO | INTC | HD | TXN | Searching for Value with John Rotonti
Mar 14 2024
CROX | AEO | AVGO | INTC | HD | TXN | Searching for Value with John Rotonti
Investors are continually looking for a good deal in the stock market. But how exactly should we define value? Quantitatively, publicly-traded companies should serve as compounding machines for their investors. They raise capital -- either through debt or by issuing stock -- then put it to work into projects. If the after-tax profits they generate are greater than their associated costs, they're creating value for us as the owners of the business (i.e. as the investors). But the investing world is also extremely complex. Markets are changing and being disrupted by new technologies every year. CEOs and leadership teams are continually trying to balance between their desire to be visionary and their need to be efficient. Underinvesting in growth could put a company several steps behind its competitors. Yet going "all-in" on an acquisition that turns out badly could very quickly light their shareholders' capital on fire. So what are we as the investors to do? Are there specific metrics we should look at, to determine if a company is using our money responsibly? How should we figure out what the right price is to pay for a stock? And are their any specific stocks out there right now, which might be significantly undervalued and could represent a great bargain for us as investors? investing CEO Simon Erickson recently spoke with John Rotonti, who is the host of the JRo Show podcast (and available on both Spotify and Apple Podcasts). John previously worked for nine years at The Motley Fool, where he was an analyst on several newsletters and most recently served as their Head of Investor Training and Development. Simon and John have been friends for a decade, and we recently exclusively published his interview with legendary Fidelity fund manager Joel Tillinghast on our own 7investing site. Tune in for an in-depth and fascinating look at how to find value in today's stock market.
Averting the SaaS Apocalypse with Simon Taylor
Dec 12 2023
Averting the SaaS Apocalypse with Simon Taylor
It's not a matter of if, it's a matter of when. If you've never been the victim of a cyberattack or a data breach, the chances are that you will be soon. Ranging from simple phishing emails to elaborate and highly-coordinated campaigns to steal government secrets, the severity of cyberattacks all across the globe is intensifying. And the need to for best-in-class security vendors -- to proactively protect you before an "oh shoot" moment occurs -- has never been greater. Yet how do we know who to trust? There are also thousands of cybersecurity providers who offer services to protect against cybercrime. That ranges from small startups with a clever idea, to independent corporations like CrowdStrike (Nasdaq: CRWD) or SentinelOne (NYSE: S) who leaders in their niche, to consolidated behemoths like Microsoft  (Nasdaq: MSFT) and Palo Alto Networks (Nasdaq: PANW) with a full suite of products. There's an massive pool of vendors to choose from. According to research from Cisco (Nasdaq: CSC), 13% of companies are working with at least 20 different vendors for cybersecurity alone. So how should companies differentiate themselves in this crowded field? What dangerous security vulnerabilities still aren't yet adequately protected against? And how should investors figure out which publicly-traded companies to put their money behind? To help us answer those questions, we’ve brought in an expert. 7investing CEO Simon Erickson recently spoke with Simon Taylor, who is the founder and CEO of HYCU, about how to tune out the noise and look for the true winners in this space.