This is Richardson

Tiffany Norris

Get to know your neighbors! Listen as host Tiffany Norris talks with local folks on this local podcast for the city of Richardson, Texas in the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex.

Revisiting Richardson Places
Apr 30 2020
Revisiting Richardson Places
A couple of episodes back,  (we did an update on Richardson restaurants) in light of the COVID-19 situation, so in this episode we wanted to revisit some of the Richardson places we’ve talked about in previous episodes. Editor’s Note: This situation is changing day-by-day, so this is the latest from the businesses on the day we’re recording. Check out each place’s website or social media for the most up to date information. (The UPS store on Coit and Campbell) is open for business, but when we go check our mailbox, we’ve noticed customers and staff are definitely practicing social distancing and wearing masks. (Richardson Bike Mart) is also open for business. The Richardson location is only providing bicycle service at this time, but they do have online purchasing options and even some deals going on. (The Kids Play Co) is currently closed, but their website says they’re considering an option for “Private Play” where one family could reserve the play area for an hour at a time. So reach out to them if that’s something you want more information about. (Pure Barre Richardson) and  (Toby‘s School of Dance) are both offering livestream classes. All of Toby’s classes, in particular, are being taught via Zoom, which I just love. Their website said “Don’t fall into the trap of too much screen time, isolation, and inactivity,” and I thought that was such an important reminder during this stressful time. As we talked about on a previous episode, the spring concert was postponed for the  (Richardson Community Chorale). The Cottonwood Art Festival has been canceled as has the Wildflower Arts and Music Festival. Events at the  (Eisemann Center) have been canceled or postponed through May 17, but check out their website for tickets that are still available for purchase for future events. So I don’t know about you, but going to the park and going to the library are two of the things my girls have missed the most during all of this. (Parks and trails remain open), with social distancing encouraged of course, but people are discouraged from using the playgrounds and park fixtures because it’s hard to keep them clean enough to ensure safe use. The  (Richardson Public Library) building is also closed but offering curbside pickup. Also, as a librarian myself, I feel the need to say very clearly that our library buildings might be closed, but libraries remain open. Most of us are still providing a huge number of electronic resources and online services, and the Richardson Public Library is no exception. Finally, the  (Richardson Animal Shelter) is allowing visitors by appointment only, and those appointments are for reclaiming a pet or adoption. Volunteers and community service activities have been suspended for now. I’ve seen several people that have taken this opportunity to adopt a pet. They’re home more and able to train it. It’s good for their mental health during this stressful time. And it gives an animal a much-needed home. So if it’s something you’ve been considering, this just might be the time to do it. The Richardson Animal Shelter can still help you out with those adoptions. So that’s a quick update on the Richardson businesses and places we’ve featured in previous episodes. Again, that’s subject to change, of course, but we thought it was important to take a snapshot of where we are now, to highlight and support some of these places... Support this podcast
Revisiting Richardson Restaurants
Apr 17 2020
Revisiting Richardson Restaurants
I'm Tiffany Norris, and you're listening to This Is Richardson, a podcast that tells the stories of the people and places of Richardson, Texas. This is a strange time right now in the world, so this week we wanted to take a look back at some of the places we've featured on the podcast up to this point and let you know how they're dealing with everything. First up is the restaurants. We've interviewed the owners of seven Richardson restaurants during the last few months, and they are all still open for business in one way or another. Most are still doing either curbside pickup, drive-through, and/or delivery. We can personally vouch for the delivery options for Sweet Firefly and Tongue in Cheek as ice cream is my comfort food of choice these days. Eiland Coffee and Woody B's also offer shipping options, and the store front of Sweet Daze is closed, but they are still doing catering orders. Now Communion Neighborhood Cooperative has been doing some really cool things. Like the others, they offer an online ordering option where you can pick up coffee, many of their regular menu items, or a family meal to go. But they've also launched a campaign called 400 for 500 that we wanted to highlight in this episode. Here's how it works. For $200, you get 6 of their family-style meals. These are delicious and made from scratch in the Communion Kitchen, and they serve at least four people. You can pick them up hot and ready to go or get them cold and warm them up later in the oven. You can get all six in the same week or spread it out and do one each week for six weeks. When they hit 400 of these subscriptions, they're committing to serving an additional 100 people per week. Thus the name 400 for 500. Those additional 100 people will include those that are most affected by COVID-19 in our community. So they say that is people who are losing jobs and significant income, first responders, health-care providers, and anyone else who would just be blessed by a meal. It's hard not to love this idea. Because with a subscription, you're not just helping your family eat. You're not just helping those additional 100 people that Communion is committing to feed. You're also helping a Richardson business and the people who work there. You're helping them stay viable through this uncertain time. You know, I joked about ice cream earlier, but we really have found ourselves eating out a little more during this quarantined time just because we're aware that the local restaurants that we love have taken a hard hit. And we want to support them. For our little family, that support feels small sometimes, but we are doing what we can. And what we can do includes this podcast. So the next time you're craving some ice cream or coffee or barbecue or just can't deal with cooking one night, think about one of these seven Richardson businesses: (Communion Neighborhood Cooperative) (Eiland Coffee Roasters) (Reverie Bakeshop) (Sweet Daze) (Sweet Firefly) (Tongue in Cheek) (Woody B's BBQ) I hope we can actually see you at one of these places soon. I'm Tiffany Norris. Thanks for listening to This Is Richardson. Support this podcast