The Counselor Live with Sheldon Stovall Mon - Friday starting at 10AM EST

Sheldon Stovall

Coming to you live Monday Thru Friday starting at 10AM on YouTube. The Counselor live is a podcast discussing current social issues. Sheldon L Stovall has his Master's degree in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling from Assumption University in Worcester, MA. The Counselor.Live is giving opportunities for the community to connect with the Counselors Network. Sheldon Stovall is a published author. One of his books is available everywhere "Where is the Storehouse? on Amazon.com. You can book an appointment to speak with the Counselor by visiting his website. www.thecounselor.live. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support read less
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Episodes

Tax Time Trauma
Feb 23 2024
Tax Time Trauma
How to Cope With Tax-Time Stress: Experts explain ways to avoid the emotional storms of tax season. Medically Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD Spring is the season when the cherry trees and cottonwoods bloom. For Barbara Halpern, spring is also the season when her workweek blooms to 80 hours or more. Accompanying those long work hours are the colds, migraines, dizziness, and weight swings that plague Halpern and her colleagues at her small accounting firm in suburban Connecticut. "Everyone is rundown and susceptible," Halpern, owner of Halpern & Associates, tells WebMD. "We hate the spring and nice weather. It's not supposed to get warm until April 16."Tax preparers like Halpern may bear the brunt of tax-time stress. But nearly everyone has a reason to dread the 1040 tango. Some hate the math; some hate the feds. And yet others hate having to grapple with one of the great mysteries of life: Where did the money go? Stress-Relieving Tips: Herewith, a few tips for stressed-out taxpayers: To avoid last-minute stress, file early and break up the job into little pieces, Mellan suggests. Do your taxes while listening to music or whatever else makes you feel relaxed.For filers with math anxiety, Mellan recommends hiring a preparer or investing in tax software. Tax software typically collects information through an "interview" and the computer does all the calculations.Fractious couples should strategize on ways to avoid chronic money fights, Mellan says. For example, try communicating financial information through notes or other modes that won't carry an accusatory tone. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Online Relationships Gone Bad
Feb 19 2024
Online Relationships Gone Bad
Why you shouldn't use dating apps? Columbia Journalism Investigations surveyed 1,200 women and found that more than a third of them reported being sexually assaulted or raped by someone they'd met through a dating site. One of the points you turn to a lot is that dating apps make people feel disposable and that they gamify dating. Do people get married from online dating? Over 17% of Marriages Start Through Online Dating According to the Statistic Brain Research Institute, 1 in 5 relationships and a little more than 1 in 6 marriages begin online. About 17% of marriages and 20% of relationships begin online.  How successful are marriages from online dating? The findings revealed that marriages from online relationships were more likely to last longer than marriages formed offline. "Marriage breakups were reported in about 6 percent of the people who met online, compared with 7.6 percent of the people who met offline," the study reported. Do people actually get married from dating apps? Over 13 Percent Said They Got Engaged Or Married From An App Seven percent had reached between six months and a year with someone they met on an app, 15 percent said had reached longer than a year, and 14 percent said they were engaged or married— so it really does happen, if that's what you're looking for --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Substance abuse and addiction Part 5 of 5
Feb 16 2024
Substance abuse and addiction Part 5 of 5
Sheldon Stovall discuses options for detox, treatment centers, social support and medication assisted treatment.  Social History of Teenage Drug Use (From Teen Drug Use, P 19-24 ... https://www.ojp.gov › ncjrs › virtual-library › abstracts What is the average age of first drug use? abuse treatment admissions aged 18 to 30 with known age of initiation information (74.0 percent) began substance use at the age of 17 or younger; 10.2 percent initiated use at the age of 11 or younger, What is the average age for a drug addict? These findings suggest that trends toward starting to use at a later age may have already ended for those two drugs, Alcover said. The earliest average age of first drug use across the study timeframe was 15.4 for inhalants, whereas the latest average age was 18.0 for cocaine and crack cocaine What is the number one drug used by teens? Alcohol and tobacco are the drugs most commonly abused by adolescents, followed by marijuana. The next most popular substances differ between age groups. What age is most affected by drugs? Most research suggests that early (12–14 years old) to late (15–17 years old) adolescence is a critical risk period for the initiation of substance use and that substance use may peak among young people aged 18–25 years When did teens start using drugs? The real increase in juvenile drug use began in the early 1960's and was spurred on by the burgeoning counterculture. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Substance abuse and addiction Part 1 of 5
Feb 12 2024
Substance abuse and addiction Part 1 of 5
The Counselor live discusses substance abuse in teens and a live interview starting at 10AM with a special guest currently in recovery from over 35 years of heroin, crack, alcohol, fentanyl and opiate addiction tells his story. While it can be tempting to try a drug or addictive activity for the first time, it’s all too easy for things to go south — especially in the case of drug and alcohol abuse. People develop tolerances when they repeatedly abuse substances over time. That means larger amounts of drugs or alcohol are required to achieve the desired effects, escalating the nature of the addiction. Prolonged substance abuse can result in a dangerous cycle of addiction: one where people need to continue using drugs or alcohol in order to avoid the uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal. By the time people realize they have a problem drugs or alcohol may have already seized control, causing users to prioritize substance abuse over everything else that was once important in their lives. No one ever plans to become addicted. There are countless reasons why someone would try a substance or behavior. Some are driven by curiosity and peer pressure, while others are looking for a way to relieve stress. Children who grow up in environments where drugs and alcohol are present have a greater risk of developing a substance use disorder (SUD) down the road. Other factors that might steer a person toward harmful substance use behavior include:   Questions and Answers today starting at 10AM                  Tune in the Conversation is getting heated! --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Body Image issues in America vs Other Countries Part 2 of 3
Feb 8 2024
Body Image issues in America vs Other Countries Part 2 of 3
If you are someone you know is dealing with an eating disorder contact the  Walden Behavioral Care 51 Sawyer Road, Suite 510     Waltham, MA 02453 888-305-2997 1. Eating disorders are complex brain disorders with strong genetic, neurobiological and psychological underpinnings. No single person, experience, or issue causes an eating disorder. They often co-occur with and can be hidden by anxiety disorders, depression, OCD, PTSD, and substance use disorder. The good news is that we don't need to know the exact cause of your child's eating disorder to treat it effectively. 2. Researchers are still learning what triggers or "turns on" eating disorders in the brain. For many, it seems to come from a negative energy balance caused from more calories out than in which can be triggered by a diet, over-exercise, stomach bug, or surgery. Once that imbalance occurs, a switch flips in the brain, turning the eating disorder on and tyrannizing the brain. 3. Many people use disordered eating behaviors, such as bingeing, purging, excessive exercise, and restricting, to help regulate or soothe their emotions – similar to the use of alcohol or self-harm to escape difficult feelings. When these behaviors are used frequently to manage emotions, it goes from 'disordered eating' to being an 'eating disorder.' 4. Societal and cultural factors such as the pandemic, diet culture, and social media can trigger an eating disorder for those with a genetic predisposition and/or can trigger big emotions that people try to combat with disordered behaviors. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Prevent your teen from becoming a felon Part 1 of 2
Feb 5 2024
Prevent your teen from becoming a felon Part 1 of 2
Sheldon Stovall discusses patterns to lookout for when your teen is failing in school and later becoming felons.  Students who are failing are much more likely to find themselves on the paths to prison than those who are not. Schools have upped out-of-school suspensions by around 10 percent since 2000, and that is more than double what it was in the 1970s, points out the Justice Policy Institute. Students who have been suspended tend to be held back and wind up dropping out of school more often than those who are not suspended. Are dropouts more likely to go to jail? High school dropouts also have a much higher probability of ending up in prison or jail. Nearly 80 percent of all prisoners are high school dropouts or recipients of the General Educational Development (GED) credential. (More than half of inmates with a GED earned it while incarcerated.) Can failing schools be turned around? Research confirms that there are no documented instances of failing schools turning around without powerful leadership. While teachers have the most direct and obvious impact on student learning, leadership is second only to teaching in influencing outcomes for all students. CALL IN TODAY AND ASK IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO SAVE YOUR LIFE OR A FRIEND THE COUNSELOR LIVE WITH SHELDON STOVALL --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Teen Suicide Ages 10-15 Part 2 of 2
Feb 2 2024
Teen Suicide Ages 10-15 Part 2 of 2
Lifeline Chat is a National Number in the USA for help with suicide ideation.  Call Today for immediate services and counseling. Lifeline Chat is a service of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, connecting individuals with counselors for emotional support and other services via web chat. All chat centers in the Lifeline network are accredited by CONTACT USA. Lifeline Chat is available 24/7 across the U.S. What is teen suicide? Suicide is when a teen causes his or her own death on purpose. Before attempting to take his or her own life, a teen may have thoughts of wanting to die. This is called suicidal ideation. He or she may also have suicidal behavior. That’s when a teen is focused on doing things that cause his or her own death. Suicide is the third leading cause of death in young people ages 15 to 24. The CDC reports that: Boys are 4 times more likely to die from suicide than girls.Girls are more likely to attempt suicide than boys.Guns are used in more than half of youth suicides. What causes a teen to attempt suicide? The teen years are a stressful time. They are filled with major changes. These include body changes, changes in thoughts, and changes in feelings. Strong feelings of stress, confusion, fear, and doubt may influence a teen’s problem-solving and decision-making. He or she may also feel a pressure to succeed. For some teens, normal developmental changes can be very unsettling when combined with other events, such as: Changes in their families, such as divorce or moving to a new townChanges in friendshipsProblems in schoolOther losses These problems may seem too hard or embarrassing to overcome. For some, suicide may seem like a solution. Which teens are at risk for suicide? A teen’s risk for suicide varies with age, gender, and cultural and social influences. Risk factors may change over time. They are: One or more mental or substance abuse problemsImpulsive behaviorsUndesirable life events or recent losses, such as the death of a parentFamily history of mental or substance abuse problemsFamily history of suicideFamily violence, including physical, sexual, or verbal or emotional abusePast suicide attemptGun in the homeImprisonmentExposure to the suicidal behavior of others, such as from family or peers, in the news, or in fiction stories --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Teen Suicide Ages 10-15 Part 1 of 2
Feb 1 2024
Teen Suicide Ages 10-15 Part 1 of 2
Lifeline Chat is a National Number in the USA for help with suicide ideation.  Call Today for immediate services and counseling.  Lifeline Chat is a service of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, connecting individuals with counselors for emotional support and other services via web chat. All chat centers in the Lifeline network are accredited by CONTACT USA. Lifeline Chat is available 24/7 across the U.S. What is teen suicide? Suicide is when a teen causes his or her own death on purpose. Before attempting to take his or her own life, a teen may have thoughts of wanting to die. This is called suicidal ideation. He or she may also have suicidal behavior. That’s when a teen is focused on doing things that cause his or her own death. Suicide is the third leading cause of death in young people ages 15 to 24. The CDC reports that: Boys are 4 times more likely to die from suicide than girls.Girls are more likely to attempt suicide than boys.Guns are used in more than half of youth suicides. What causes a teen to attempt suicide? The teen years are a stressful time. They are filled with major changes. These include body changes, changes in thoughts, and changes in feelings. Strong feelings of stress, confusion, fear, and doubt may influence a teen’s problem-solving and decision-making. He or she may also feel a pressure to succeed. For some teens, normal developmental changes can be very unsettling when combined with other events, such as: Changes in their families, such as divorce or moving to a new townChanges in friendshipsProblems in schoolOther losses These problems may seem too hard or embarrassing to overcome. For some, suicide may seem like a solution. Which teens are at risk for suicide? A teen’s risk for suicide varies with age, gender, and cultural and social influences. Risk factors may change over time. They are: One or more mental or substance abuse problemsImpulsive behaviorsUndesirable life events or recent losses, such as the death of a parentFamily history of mental or substance abuse problemsFamily history of suicideFamily violence, including physical, sexual, or verbal or emotional abusePast suicide attemptGun in the homeImprisonmentExposure to the suicidal behavior of others, such as from family or peers, in the news, or in fiction stories --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Social anxiety in teens Part 2 of 3
Jan 30 2024
Social anxiety in teens Part 2 of 3
Ask questions to the Counselor live regarding symptoms and diagnosis.  WHAT IS SOCIAL ANXIETY? Social anxiety disorder (SAD) affects 1 out of 3 adolescents between 13 and 18 years old. Over 19 million people across America suffer from social anxiety disorder (SAD) today. It is the most common anxiety disorder and third most common mental health disorder in the country.  Social Anxiety Disorder, also known as Social Phobia, is marked by ongoing and pervasive fear of social interaction and/or situations where embarrassment might occur. While it is common to experience some anxiety in new social situations, individuals with social anxiety disorder feel overwhelming self-consciousness, distress, and fear of judgement in day-to-day social interactions. SAD prevents individuals from having normal relationships and interactions. It can also negatively affect normal daily activities. Additionally, those who suffer from SAD often experience intense worry about upcoming social situations (causing distress days or even weeks in advance). People with social anxiety disorder frequently avoid social interactions all together. This leads to diminished relationships, withdrawal and overall isolation. Like many other anxiety disorders, those with SAD may realize and acknowledge that their anxiety is often unreasonable or unwarranted, but still find themselves trapped in the cycle of anxiety and fear of social humiliation or embarrassment. Strong physical symptoms, such as nausea, trembling, sweating, or blushing, may occur in sufferers even in “normal”, everyday social situations. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support
Social anxiety in teens Part 1 of 3
Jan 29 2024
Social anxiety in teens Part 1 of 3
HOW DO I KNOW IF MY TEEN HAS SOCIAL ANXIETY? If you are a parent, then it is likely you hope your child will grow up feeling self-assured and comfortable in their own skin, as these characteristics are some of the most vital when it comes to thriving socially, and thus, achieving an overall sense of wellbeing.  Unfortunately, there are many children who mature into socially anxious teenagers.  This can happen for a variety of reasons, and there may be multiple factors that contribute to a teen’s social anxiety. What causes social anxiety in a teenager?  Behaviors learned from role models (especially parents). Over time, shyness can build into social phobia. Shy parents might also unintentionally set an example by avoiding certain social interactions. A shy child who watches this learns that socializing is uncomfortable, distressing, and something to avoid. WHAT IS SOCIAL ANXIETY? Social anxiety disorder (SAD) affects 1 out of 3 adolescents between 13 and 18 years old. Over 19 million people across America suffer from social anxiety disorder (SAD) today. It is the most common anxiety disorder and third most common mental health disorder in the country.  Social Anxiety Disorder, also known as Social Phobia, is marked by ongoing and pervasive fear of social interaction and/or situations where embarrassment might occur. While it is common to experience some anxiety in new social situations, individuals with social anxiety disorder feel overwhelming self-consciousness, distress, and fear of judgement in day-to-day social interactions. SAD prevents individuals from having normal relationships and interactions. It can also negatively affect normal daily activities. Additionally, those who suffer from SAD often experience intense worry about upcoming social situations (causing distress days or even weeks in advance). People with social anxiety disorder frequently avoid social interactions all together. This leads to diminished relationships, withdrawal and overall isolation. Like many other anxiety disorders, those with SAD may realize and acknowledge that their anxiety is often unreasonable or unwarranted, but still find themselves trapped in the cycle of anxiety and fear of social humiliation or embarrassment. Strong physical symptoms, such as nausea, trembling, sweating, or blushing, may occur in sufferers even in “normal”, everyday social situations. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/sheldon-stovall/support