My Favorite Mistake: Careers & Business, Growth & Lessons Learned From Mistakes

Mark Graban

Do you make mistakes at work and in business? Of course. We all do. But do we learn from them? Listen and you'll hear executives, entrepreneurs, and other interesting people discuss their “favorite mistakes” and what they learned, including how to prevent making the same mistakes again. Or, how to turn apparent mistakes into positives. We discuss how to create a culture where it's safe to talk about mistakes – this leads to continuous improvement, instead of blaming and shaming others or beating ourselves up. Hosted by Mark Graban (author of "Lean Hospitals" and "Measures of Success"). Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/favorite-mistake/support

Psychologist Kristin Neff Was a "Mama Bear" in Defending Her Ph.D. Student and Had to Apologize
5d ago
Psychologist Kristin Neff Was a "Mama Bear" in Defending Her Ph.D. Student and Had to Apologize
Professor, author, and researcher on "self-compassion" My guest for Episode #183 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is psychologist Dr. Kristin Neff. Episode page with video, transcript, and more She is the author of the books Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, and the 2021 follow up book — Fierce Self-Compassion: How Women Can Harness Kindness to Speak Up, Claim Their Power and Thrive. Kristin received her doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley and is currently an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. While doing her post-doctoral work she decided to conduct research on self-compassion – a central construct in Buddhist psychology and one that had not yet been examined empirically. I learned about Kristin's work thanks to a mention of her by Dan Pink, my guest in Episode 137. In this episode, Kristin tells her favorite mistake story about passionately defending one of her dissertation students who wasn't passed by a new assistant professor. Why was Kristin being a “mama bear” and why was she called on the carpet by her department chair? What did she learn from this experience and how did she apply “self-compassion” to herself in this instance? We also talk about questions and topics including: Before talking about self-compassion, people might have mistaken definitions of compassion… how do you describe the true meaning of compassion toward others?HBR – self-compassion articles“Self-compassion vs. self-esteem”Finding the balance in acknowledging, reflecting, and learning vs. dwelling…“Having compassion also means that you offer understanding and kindness to others when they fail or make mistakes, rather than judging them harshly.” — can you share an example that illustrates that?How can we practice self compassion when we realize we have made a mistake in our work?Important to soothe ourselves before reflecting on our mistake? How we might do that?Does it help us be self-compassionate when others are compassionate toward us when we make mistakes?What Self-Compassion is not — mistaken views?Self-Compassion free survey --- Support this podcast:
Search Firm CEO Gene Rice: Youthful Ego and an Impulsive Decision Could Have Ruined Him
Sep 18 2022
Search Firm CEO Gene Rice: Youthful Ego and an Impulsive Decision Could Have Ruined Him
Chairman and co-founder of Rice Cohen International Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #182 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Gene Rice, the Chairman and Co-Founder of Rice Cohen International. He's the co-author, with his daughter, of the book Grad to Grown-Up: 68 Tips to Excel in Your Personal and Professional Life. You can learn more at the book's website. Gene has been in the recruiting industry for nearly 30 years and has been recognized as one of the top Executive Search professionals in the world. He has completed over 1,000 retained searches which have included 211 in the C-suite. Having also filled over 300 Partner, Principal, and Director level searches in the Management Consulting, Performance Improvement, and EdTech verticals, Gene is considered to be the #1 search executive in the space. He has even been recognized by Recruiter.com as one of the “100 Most Influential People in the History of the Executive Recruiting Industry.” Gene also co-founded Rice Cohen Training & Consulting, the largest training firm focused on improving the skills of executive recruiters. Gene is very passionate about this space and believes in supporting the industry he loves. He has become an Executive Coach to the CEOs of many search firms. As an active member of the community, Gene finds various ways to give back and contribute. After years of being involved with the Make-a-Wish Foundation and serving on the board, Gene and his wife Michele founded the Plant A Seed, Inspire A Dream Foundation. The 501 c-3 non-profit helps financially challenged youth to pursue their passions. Since being founded in 2008, the foundation has awarded over 700 scholarships and has been featured in People Magazine. In this episode, Gene tells his favorite mistake story about quitting a job to start a competing live music venue on Long Island and how his “huge ego” led him to be “impulsive” in the decision to do so. Why does he say it “could have destroyed” him, why is it better to make mistakes like this when you're young, and how did he apply the lessons learned in his successful career? We also talk about questions and topics including: Coaching young professionals who make mistakes?Mistakes in working with an executive retained recruiter as a candidate?Selecting C-level executives? — what helps make for a good match (3 things you really need)The importance of C-level executives also having personal success and professional fulfillment (not just a job) — get your arms around that as a young professionalCoaching college interns — helping them the first time they fail… looking at failing differentlyCharity that he started in 2008 with his wife: “Plant A Seed Inspire A Dream Foundation” --- Support this podcast:
Thought She Needed to Have All the Answers as Manager: Pamela Kellert
Sep 11 2022
Thought She Needed to Have All the Answers as Manager: Pamela Kellert
Strategic Leadership Expert Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #181 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Pamela Kellert. She helps female professionals in STEM sectors transition to senior management roles by learning strategic non-technical skills. Pamela is a seasoned Strategic Leadership Expert with over 16 year’s experience working in Strategy, Business Development and Project Delivery, heading diverse teams at leading organisations across Australia, Asia, Europe and North America. She has managed complex engineering projects and profit & loss responsibility of over $100 million with a team of over 100 employees. Throughout her career, Pamela has coached professionals in their leadership journey and created a systemised online coaching program to help women accelerate their careers to senior leadership roles. Learn more via her website. In this episode, Pamela tells her favorite mistake story about how she thought she needed to have all of the answers when she was promoted into her first management position. If she was promoted for being good at problem solving, shouldn't she be solving all of the problems as manager? How did Pamela realize this was a mistake and how does she help other women learn from her mistakes? We also talk about questions and topics including: As manager, how should one integrate the ideas and solutions of others?When to delegate and when to intervene?Being promoted to senior leadership roles – what are the different challenges there?Moving into a new function? Challenges there?Do some executives never learn the lesson you did?Challenges / mistakes with STEM women who want to step up into leadership positions and then into senior management… ‘Is it important to have a female mentor? Also a male mentor?Getting along by changing behavior vs. trying to change the broader system? How others should react vs. how they do?Apologizing before saying something… diminishing language? — societal expectations?Making yourself smaller physically? Women vs. men…Different advice for women working in very male dominated environments?Finnish prime minister backlash — compare to Aussie prime minister or Boris JohnsonBeing aware of biasesSystemic sexism vs. System racism --- Support this podcast:
Tech Expert Dave Sobel "Really Screwed Up" His First Company Acquisition
Sep 5 2022
Tech Expert Dave Sobel "Really Screwed Up" His First Company Acquisition
Host of the Business of Tech podcast, and owner of MSP Radio Episode page with video, transcript and more My guest for Episode #180 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Dave Sobel. He’s the host of the Business of Tech podcast, and owner of MSP Radio. Dave is regarded as a leading expert in the delivery of technology services, with broad experience in both technology and business. He owned and operated an IT Solution Provider and MSP for over a decade, both acquiring other organizations and eventually being acquired. “The Business of Tech” is a leading IT services focused news and analysis podcast and YouTube show, with thousands of listeners and subscribers.  He also co-hosts of the podcast “Killing IT”, and authored the book Virtualization: Defined. Dave holds a bachelor's degree in Computer Science from the College of William and Mary. He lives just outside Washington DC with his wife and two cats.  His interests include travel and food, cheering the Washington Nationals and Capitals, and smoking barbeque… He was introduced to me by Jason Levin, my guest in Episode 161. In this episode, Dave tells his favorite mistake story about “screwing up an acquisition really bad.” Why did he not really understand the full situation of the company? Was it too late to make adjustments to the business after buying it? How did he apply the painful lessons learned when he sold his company in 2011 We also talk about questions and topics including: Why did he start a company?What he learned about being laid off from startups as a tech personSpent more time on the “paper” and not enough on the “people”Was it too late to make adjustments?Did you acquire other companies?Sold his business in 2011Applied the lessons learned… was a complete open book instead of withholding information like his seller hadMistakes that small businesses make in choosing technology?Examples of companies choosing software or tech because it’s trendy?How often is the mistake about HOW they implement it?The *delivery* of the tech is super important --- Support this podcast:
CEO Ian Small Was Told He "Needs to Learn to Listen Better"
Aug 22 2022
CEO Ian Small Was Told He "Needs to Learn to Listen Better"
CEO of Evernote Episode page with video, transcript, and more  My guest for Episode #178 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Ian Small, CEO at Evernote, the app that launched a personal productivity movement for knowledge workers around the world. Under Ian’s leadership (since 2018), Evernote found the courage to go back to basics, launching a new era of innovation for the company and building upon a decade of growth. Ian brings more than 25 years of global product, technology, and business leadership experience to his current role. Trained as an engineer, Ian's career has evolved from designing and building user experiences at Apple into product leadership and large-scale business management as CEO of TokBox and global Chief Data Officer for Telefónica SA. In addition to his current role at Evernote, Ian sits on the board of directors for Lumentum and is an advisory board member for Alphabet subsidiary Loon (a graduate of Google’s X Lab). He holds a Master’s degree in Computer Science, a BASc in Engineering Science from the University of Toronto, and has earned more than 10 patents. In this episode, Ian tells his favorite mistake story about being told, early in his career, that he needed to be a better listener. What were the consequences as he became a manager? How did he realize that he needed to change and how did he work to overcome that bad habit to the point that he can now coach younger leaders to avoid or get out of this same trap? And how did Ian learn to listen better to customers and employees alike? We also talk about questions and topics including: Your favorite patent? Having to change habits… how? “Listen with a beginner’s mind “ Marc Benioff – Salesforce The episode with Emily Learing Overhauling Evernote over 2 years — rebuilt from scratch? Better listening to customers, employees, and the board/investors Everybody internally (and customers) could tell you what the problem — why wasn’t it being addressed? Was Evernote not listening or not taking action? The mistake of inaction vs. action? What do you think of the SV mantra “fail fast, fail often”? How to avoid needing another reboot in 2030? Mistakes in how users use Evernote or is that not possible? --- Support this podcast:
Therapist Emily Learing's Child Care Program Mistake Could Have Been Worse, Opened New Possibilities
Aug 15 2022
Therapist Emily Learing's Child Care Program Mistake Could Have Been Worse, Opened New Possibilities
Mental Health Professional, Children's Book Author, and more My guest for Episode #177 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Emily Learing, LMFT, RPT-S. She is a mental health professional based in South Dakota, at her practice called Encompass Mental Health. Episode page with links, video, transcript, and more Emily has an MA in Marriage and Family Therapy and a BS in Human Development and Family Studies. She’s a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a Registered Play Therapist. She has a blog called Disciplined Children. Emily is the author of a fantastic children’s book: Henry Knows Best!: A Story About Learning From Mistakes and Listening to Others. I read it and found important lessons and reminders for me as an adult. In this episode, Emily tells her favorite mistake story about setting up a child care center that was intended to attend to mental health needs — but the phone rang off the hook with people wanting and needing typical day care services. Why did she close the door to that program and how did that open the door to other possibilities? How did Emily manage to keep this in the realm of a small mistake that wasn't catastrophically expensive? We also talk about questions and topics including: Tell us what inspired you to write the book? Again, the title is Henry Knows Best!: A Story About Learning From Mistakes and Listening to OthersOppositional Defiance Disorder vs just liking to say no?How many kids are like Henry?The consequences of always knowing best – damaged relationships?Overconfidence vs. narcissism“If you think you need help, you probably need help…”Some of my previous guests have admitted that they didn’t listen to experts when they should have — that they knew best… Congressman Will Hurd and Jim McCann founder of 1-800-FLOWERS.You say “I’m not a perfect person… I make mistakes… I don’t expect perfection… that’s not reality” — how does admitting that help clients, how does it help you work with clients?Does it help others open up to you?Having to live the values you’re stating about not being perfect…Being a play therapistOn your blog, you write about games that can be used to help kids with ADHD develop their attention spans. Tell us about that…Tell us more about the podcast…  “The Informed Parent” (coming soon)A BONUS favorite mistake from Emily --- Support this podcast:
Slapped a Colleague on a Plane: Canadian Journalist & Author Mike Ulmer
Aug 8 2022
Slapped a Colleague on a Plane: Canadian Journalist & Author Mike Ulmer
Publisher, book coach, and more. Episode page with video, transcript, and more.  My guest for Episode #176 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Mike Ulmer. While he specializes in helping business people write their books, he has written 13 books with a total of nearly $1 million in total sales revenue. His latest book (March 2022) is Show and Tell Writing: A Great Short Business Book About How To Write A Great Short Business Book. His other recent titles are Drop The Mic Marketing with Jason Hunt (2022), The 50-Year-Old Millennial: The Leadership Gap Exposed By Millennials And How To Close it with Marc Petitpas (2021) and The 40 Ways of The Fox (2021) with Ron Foxcroft. He worked as the in-house storyteller for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Raptors and TFC as the senior writer at Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment. He has written for The Toronto Star, National Post, Southam News Bureau as well as news organizations across Canada. Interesting fact — With 170,000 in sales, his book, M is for Maple is the bestselling alphabet book in Canadian publishing history. His website is www.getcatapulted.com. In this episode, Mike tells his favorite mistake story about striking a journalist colleague while in flight on a plane. Why did his sense of “grandiosity and recklessness” lead to this moment that changed his life? Why was this a “favorite mistake”? How did this moment make Mike realize that he needed help so he could now lead a better life? We also talk about questions and topics including: As a cancer survivor, why is it a mistake to use the phrase “battle with cancer?”Why should people write a business book? You say in your book “everyone should” — why is that?Even if you’re not a writer?Credibility… Mistake to assume you can also speak?Mistake to write with the audience in mind?“Have to take a contrarian stance”Publishing mistakes?Predatory people in the publishing system?“When I see the term best seller… bullshit” --- Support this podcast:
Marine LTC Janet Polach Lost Her Temper in a Corporate Meeting — It Was a Bad Fit
Aug 1 2022
Marine LTC Janet Polach Lost Her Temper in a Corporate Meeting — It Was a Bad Fit
Episode page with video, transcript and more My guest for Episode #175 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Janet L. Polach, Ph.D. She is a global leadership development partner and coach.  She has developed leaders in the U.S. and around the world. As a retired lieutenant colonel having spent 20 years in the Marines, Janet knows a thing or two about what it takes to be a great leader. After receiving her Ph.D. in organizational development and working with a global consulting firm in China, Janet launched her own consulting practice helping hundreds of companies across the globe including major brands and government contractors. Her no-nonsense but lighthearted approach is what separates her from the boys and creates transformational results for even the most struggling leaders. She’s also the author of the book The Seven Mistakes New Managers Make. Her website is: www.inthelead.co. In this episode, Janet tells her favorite mistake story about losing her patience and losing her temper in front of others. She was working in the private sector and realized that a business partner hadn't held of their end of the bargain. But Janet agrees we need to “live and learn,” so she shared what she learned and how she adjusted from this encounter. We also talk about questions and topics including: Praise publicly, criticize privately?What was the culture in the Marines regarding criticismLook for red flags during the interviewing process…I think of Marines as being very serious, with a serious mission… why do you think it’s important to have a “lighthearted” approach?Why write a book about leadership mistakes? Is that more helpful than saying what TO do?“We don’t train brand new leaders”How to do an effective 1×1??Mistakes that ORGANIZATIONS make — promoting the best individual contributor to a management role?Telling managers to basically just figure out how to manage?$166 billion is spent every year on leadership training but companies are still struggling due to a lack of leadership — WHY?How does the Marine Corps teach leadership? Classroom, behaviors modeled by senior leaders? Coaching?Mistakes in change management… what mistakes to leaders make and what should they do to full engage if not excite people about change?There are many mistakes we might make in giving feedback to somebody… what comes to mind and what do you recommend?Congrats again on the publication of your book… I understand there was/were Book(s) you attempted to write but didn’t finish? --- Support this podcast:
Six Sigma Black Belt Jonathon Andell Gloated About Solving a Quality Problem
Jul 25 2022
Six Sigma Black Belt Jonathon Andell Gloated About Solving a Quality Problem
Episode page - video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #174 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Jonathon Andell. He has been a quality professional since 1987, was one of the world’s first certified Six Sigma Black Belts in 1992, and has been a consultant since 1998, and a Fellow of the American Society for Quality since 2008. Among Jonathon’s global clients are leading firms in such diverse industries as: aerospace, automotive, construction, design, electronics, food, healthcare, insurance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, service, software, and telecommunications. He has published and presented extensively. Jonathon has a BS in Metallurgical Engineering from Purdue and MS in Metallurgy from Penn State. He is an avid amateur musician and a passionate community service volunteer. In this episode, Jonathon tells his favorite mistake story about “gloating a bit” when his younger self (a “hot shot”) solved a difficult quality problem at work. Why did that damage some relationships and how did he get helpful feedback about that? We also talk about questions and topics including: Solving problems – sometimes people don’t want to admit problemsData driven… people and emotions and empathy, not just dataSix Sigma mistakes??  Expert driven – “elitist”30 Rock mocking Six Sigma?Mistake to “rank and yank” ala Jack Welch?“Huge opponent of rank and yank” — at Amazon?Brian Joiner “Fourth Generation Management” bookCreating a culture where it’s safe to talk about mistakes — what’s necessary for this?Training people but then not letting them use Six Sigma afterwardWorking on a book with John Thacker --- Support this podcast:
Teresa de Grosbois: Her Failed Africa Charity Opened Unexpected Doors
Jul 18 2022
Teresa de Grosbois: Her Failed Africa Charity Opened Unexpected Doors
Author of "Mass Influence" Episode page with episode, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #173 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Teresa de Grosbois. She is the Founder of the Evolutionary Business Council, an International Speaker and the #1 International Bestselling author of Mass Influence: The Habits of the Highly Influential, which is now a best seller in seven countries. You can download a complimentary digital version of the book here. A 4X International Bestselling Author, Teresa teaches marketing courses around the globe to business leaders and entrepreneurs on how to create massively successful word of mouth campaigns. As the Chair of the Evolutionary Business Council, Teresa leads an International, Invitation-Only Council of Speakers and Influencers dedicated to teaching the principles of success. In this episode, Teresa tells her favorite mistake story about creating a non-profit organization in Sudan that failed. Why did she “quickly realize this wasn't right”? What did she learn from this and how did that experience in Africa lead to the unexpected opening of doors to better opportunities? We also talk about questions and topics including: How did you create 3 best sellers in 8 months?What if you’re reaching out to influencers and not getting a response?From the book the book –  habits and mistakes people make in trying to influence othersDo aspiring influencers mistake self promotion and bragging?Should spend more time on building relationships with other influencers?Never talk about yourself vs. always talking about yourself?“Influencer” (like social media) vs true influence?A mistake to think you’re trying to reach “everyone”? Or is “all business leaders at all levels” even too broad to be effective?What’s the difference between “practicing at business” vs. being “aligned with your passion”?How common is the mistake of “focusing on how you make money” instead of “the service that you want to bring to others”?Big mistake — not choosing who you want to play with based on fully respecting that person?Tell me about the Evolutionary Business Council… --- Support this podcast:
Jim McCann's Favorite Mistake in Buying the 1-800-FLOWERS Phone Number
Jul 10 2022
Jim McCann's Favorite Mistake in Buying the 1-800-FLOWERS Phone Number
Founder / Chairman of 1-800-FLOWERS Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #172 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Jim McCann, the founder and chairman of 1-800-FLOWERS, one of the first companies to pioneer and popularize the use of both toll-free telephone numbers and Web sites to sell goods and services directly to consumers. Jim is a highly successful entrepreneur, public speaker and published author with titles including Talk is (Not!) Cheap: The Art of Conversation Leadership) — his passion is helping people deliver smiles. Jim’s belief in the universal need for social connections and interaction led to his founding of 1-800-FLOWERS, which he has grown into the world’s leading Florist and Gift Shop and Celebrations.com, a leading website for expert party planning content and advice. In this episode, Jim shares his “favorite mistake” story that involves what was otherwise a very good decision — acquiring the 1-800-FLOWERS telephone number. But what was the mistake involved in buying the company that had the number assigned to it? Why couldn't he just buy the number? What mistake led to Jim taking on millions of dollars of debt from that company? How did Jim learn and apply the lesson that “being cheap” and not relying on experts can cause a lot of problems? We also talk about questions and topics including: Learning to not repeat that mistake around due diligence?Finding the balance between saying mistakes are OK without just wildly trying thingsWhat the FedEx founder, Fred Smith, said to Jim that turned out to be very incorrect about shipping flowersIs it a mistake to spend too much time reflecting on mistakes?Lessons from 10-step programs, remove the shame or embarrassment from mistakesYou were approached to be one of the first companies or bosses featured “Undercover Boss” — Turned it down 3 times — was that a mistake?Learning about the business? Advice for other leaders about doing this without going undercover?“A lot of it comes down to culture and leadership” --- Support this podcast:
Executive Nick Jonsson Hid Behind a Façade of Success, Didn't Ask for Help
Jul 4 2022
Executive Nick Jonsson Hid Behind a Façade of Success, Didn't Ask for Help
Author of Executive Loneliness Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #171 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Nick Jonsson, joining us from Singapore. CONTENT WARNING: This episode contains a brief mention of a death by suicide. If you are in crisis or you think you may have an emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. If you're having suicidal thoughts, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) to talk to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area at any time (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline). Nick is the co-founder and Managing Director of one of Asia's premier networking organizations, Executives' Global Network (EGN) Singapore — a caring peer group community providing hundreds of executives a safe haven to share their challenges, receive support, and learn from each other. His passion for mental health awareness through his very lived life experiences paved the way for Nick to author his first #1 international bestselling book, published in April 2021— Executive Loneliness: The 5 Pathways to Overcoming Isolation, Stress, Anxiety and Depression in the Modern Business World. In adjunct to his book, Nick has also created a more easily accessible and less formal online community, where executives and business leaders can connect, learn about and reduce the risk of burnout and isolation, with www.Leaders-Anonymous.com. In this episode, Nick shares his “favorite mistake” story about keeping emotions in — hiding behind a facade of success and waiting too long to ask for help. Why did he struggle with alcoholism and depression, even as he became more successful in his career? What finally prompted him to look for help? What did he learn from these experiences and how has it inspired him to help others? We also talk about questions and topics including: “It’s lonely at the top” — How is executive loneliness different to everyday loneliness that any of us may experience?Loneliness in that feeling of loneliness? Executives' Global Network (EGN) Singapore — “Confidential peer networks” — available in the US and other placesDifficult for execs to ask for help before hitting rock bottom?“Smiling depression”“Insecure overachievers” — inner insecurityHis LinkedIn post that went viralImpact of Covid times? 2019 - 30% 2020 - “had doubled to 59% saying there was executive loneliness”Difference - introverts vs. extroverts?Introverts — more comfortable in isolation doesn’t mean it’s good for usAre there any cultural challenges when it comes to talking about executive loneliness? Are some countries where E.L. is a bigger problem, or countries where it’s not addressed?If I was an Executive experiencing loneliness, or I was a friend or family member of someone who I suspect might be experiencing executive loneliness, what’s an easy ‘next step’ for me to take?How might we bring this up if somebody seems like they need help?How might we recognize signs of E.L. in ourselves or others?Tell us about the networks — EGN and Leaders-Anonymous are different --- Support this podcast:
Erin Joy Averted a Huge Mistake By Making a Pandemic Pivot
Jun 27 2022
Erin Joy Averted a Huge Mistake By Making a Pandemic Pivot
Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #169 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Erin Joy. As the founder and executive consultant behind Erin Joy Business Coaching & Consulting, Erin uses over 25 years of experience in entrepreneurship, roundtable facilitation, business strategy, and executive coaching to help fellow female business owners launch, propel, and grow their companies. Erin has hosted over 300 roundtables, 200 group coaching calls, 70 live events, and 1000 online events, and the company continues to serve over 60 clients. Erin is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Business Psychology at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology to enhance her ability to connect with and support women in business on both a professional and emotional level. She is also the host of a new radio show and PODCAST: “Erin Joy Talks Business.” She has released an anthology of advice from women business owners titled The Anatomy of Accomplishment: Your Guide to Bigger, Better, Bolder Business Results. In this episode, Erin shares her “favorite mistake” story about a “huge mistake” that she avoided by making a pivot before it was too late. She was looking to franchise the roundtable side of her business — how did she discover this would have been a “heavy lift” (and an expensive one at that)? How did she pivot and what happened? We also talk about questions and topics including: What does it mean to be a “business psychologist?”Business is about making predictions… and testing… you have 25-year plan? How specific are the details of that plan? Is there wiggle room?What can we do to be more resilient and better adjust to what life and business throws at us?“Breakdowns lead to breakthroughs”Video you posted in 2021 — “A time to give up control” — when is that necessary for a business leader and how can they do that?You work mainly with women leaders and entrepreneurs — are there mistakes you help them avoid in career transitions? Or setting them up to learn from them?What do we need to be doing to build the next generation of women as leaders?Tell us about the podcast — what topics do you cover? What sort of guests do you have? Find Erin on social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInYouTube --- Support this podcast:
MIT Professor Arnold (Arnie) Barnett's "Obnoxious" Media Mistake Got Him A Lot of Attention
Jun 20 2022
MIT Professor Arnold (Arnie) Barnett's "Obnoxious" Media Mistake Got Him A Lot of Attention
Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #169 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Arnold (Arnie) Barnett. He is the George Eastman Professor of Management Science and a Professor of Statistics at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Barnett holds a BA in mathematics from Columbia College and a PhD in mathematics from MIT. His research specialty is applied mathematical modeling with a focus on problems of health and safety. Cited as “the nation’s leading expert on aviation safety,” Barnett was recognized with the 2002 President’s Citation from the Flight Safety Foundation for “truly outstanding contributions on behalf of safety.” MIT Sloan students have honored him on 14 occasions for outstanding teaching. In this episode, Arnie shares his “favorite mistake” story about blurting out something to a New York Times reporter who called to get his comment about a US Airways crash that had occurred earlier in the day. Even though he regrets saying what he did, it gave him a reputation for being “willing to talk straight” which led a torrent of requests to speak and to be interviewed in venues ranging from radio programs to NBC's Today Show. We also talk about questions and topics including: 1994 US Air had a number of crashes – a “temporary spasm of bad luck”?The NY Times article he was quoted in — the “mistake”The word “amazing”: “causing great surprise or wonder; astonishing”Lesson about talking with the press?Are we bad at estimating probabilities in general?Bad at estimating the risk of driving vs. flying?You wrote an opinion piece in late March 2022 titled “Don’t end the mask mandate for US airlines”“ending the requirement now would be a serious mistake.” —> why did you say that then and do you still say that now?I saw you give a talk about this — is the Electoral College a mistake? Is it a mistake that can be fixed?A simple fix for gerrymandering?“MIT now has a reputation of being very much woke”Tell us about the Leaders for Global Operations program… you are a popular internship and thesis advisor. Why do you like working with LGO students? --- Support this podcast:
The Firecracker Who Was Too Bold in a Relationship and at Work: Genesis Amaris Kemp's Favorite Mistakes
Jun 13 2022
The Firecracker Who Was Too Bold in a Relationship and at Work: Genesis Amaris Kemp's Favorite Mistakes
Author of the book Chocolate Drop in Corporate America: From The Pit To The Palace. Episode page: guest for Episode #168 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Genesis Amaris Kemp. She is a Creative Content Writer, Author, Self-Development Advocate, Visionary, Inclusion and Diversity enthusiast, and (I love this) a “Firecracker, and a force to be reckoned with.” She is a woman of color, a trailblazer who wants others to live out their dreams, goals, and visions. She’s the author of the book Chocolate Drop in Corporate America: From The Pit To The Palace. Genesis has been featured on four dozen-plus podcasts, and magazines, and then decided to finally start her own podcast, GEMS with Genesis Amaris Kemp. In this episode, Genesis shares her “favorite mistake” stories about being too bold. Why did her now-husband break up with her four times? Why was she told to stop being so bold at work? Was there a double standard for a woman of color? What did she learn and how did she adapt, while remaining true to herself? We also talk about questions and topics including: Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man — relationships book, Steve HarveyWorking in oil and gas – male dominatedDouble standard for women? More so as a woman of color?You write about choosing a major (and changing majors) — tell us about that thought process.In your book, you talk about having 3 job opportunities… it sounds like you chose what was the best for the long term (not just the highest pay in the now). What led to that decision?What led to you writing your book?Mistakes related to DEI — that organizations make or that individuals make?Tell us about your Podcast:Dad - victim of a medication error while a patient… paralyzedPrompted her to talk about the grief journey… into a microphone Find Genesis on social media: TwitterFacebookYouTubeInstagram --- Support this podcast:
Shutting Down a Business Was the "Best Worst Thing" That Michael Buzinski Has Done
Jun 6 2022
Shutting Down a Business Was the "Best Worst Thing" That Michael Buzinski Has Done
Marketer and author of "The Rule of 26" Episode page: guest for Episode #167 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Michael “Buzz” Buzinski, the President/CMO of Buzzworthy Integrated Marketing. Buzz is a lifelong entrepreneur, digital marketing thought leader, and best-selling author of his book The Rule of 26 For Service-Centric Businesses: Three Steps To Doubling Website Revenue. Check out his book's website. Dubbed a “visionary marketer” by the American Marketing Association, Michael’s sole mission is to  reduce the prevalence of entrepreneurial poverty in the US. Michael is a 10 year Air Force Veteran who now mentors other vetrepreneurs through “Warriors Rising”, leads marketing workshops for the Small Business Administration, the Small Business Development Center in multiple states, and has presented marketing workshops for multiple Universities. In this episode, Buzz shares his “favorite mistake” story about “the little coup” that took place at his previous company when he went on a trip to Italy to serve as a videographer instead because he had nobody else to send. While he was away, the electicity went out at the home office because somebody didn't pay the bill. Young employees “thought the company was going out of business” and that led to a lot of chaos… and his eventual decision to break up the company. Why was the the “best worst thing” that happened to Buzz and how did he move forward in a better way? We also talk about questions and topics including: Why do you say you’re a failed musician? What happened?Starving artist or musician… What does this phrase mean?What is the rule of 26?Digital marketing mistakes??Newest mistake that you’ve found?Tell us about Warriors RisingThe only three key performance indicators (KPIs) you need to track when marketing your website?How to get a free copy of his book:Get a copy of his book, The Rule of 26 on Amazon in eBook or paperback. He will send a free signed paperback copy to any listener who purchases his eBook from Amazon if they email him at buzz@buzzworthy.biz with a screenshot of their purchase and the address they want the book sent to. --- Support this podcast:
“Little Failures” Author Alisha Wielfart’s Failed Yoga Studio Was Her Greatest Learning Experience
May 30 2022
“Little Failures” Author Alisha Wielfart’s Failed Yoga Studio Was Her Greatest Learning Experience
Episode page: guest for Episode #166 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Alisha Wielfaert, a leadership, creativity, transitions and resiliency coach for women. She started her career at an over one-hundred-year-old insurance company. She moved on from that. Along the way, she started studying yoga at the Asheville Yoga Center not just as a physical practice but as a spiritual path. She opened a yoga studio… and then sold it… Alisha is also the author of a book that’s just been released, titled Little Failures: Learning to Build Resilience Through Everyday Setbacks, Challenges, and Obstacles. Enter to win a signed copy!! She is the host of a podcast, The Yoke and Abundance: Wise Women Podcast and her company is called Yoke and Abundance. In this episode, Alisha shares her “favorite mistake” story about opening a yoga studio that “did nothing but lose money” as it went into bankruptcy. Why was this her “greatest learning experience” but also the “most shameful” that has happened to her? Why did the business fail and what lessons did Alisha learn that she has (and will) apply to other businesses? We also talk about questions and topics including: Passion plus seeking for purpose in lifeBootstrapping was a problem – couldn’t fully commitLessons for when you became a coach?Do the failures help you be a better coach?The Dropout? Elizabeth HolmesOther thoughts or tips on how to analyze or process our failures?People who are successful after failures do what things?How to not get stuck in the grieving and processing time?Fear of mistakes — Atelophobia is an obsessive fear of imperfectionDo you see a difference between “mistakes” and “failures”? Let’s explore that…“Planning for failures” in the writing and release of the book?You write about the idea of “Failing out loud” — the implications for women and minorities?TEDx talk – founder of Girls Who Code (Reshma Saujani)Tell us the story behind the name of your company, Yoke and Abundance? --- Support this podcast:
Entrepreneur and CTO Mark Herschberg Believed a Promise That Wasn’t in Writing
May 23 2022
Entrepreneur and CTO Mark Herschberg Believed a Promise That Wasn’t in Writing
Author of The Career Toolkit. Episode page: guest for Episode #165 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Mark Herschberg, the author of the book The Career Toolkit, Essential Skills for Success That No One Taught You. Learn more at his book's website. This is Mark's 300th appearance as a podcast guest! From tracking criminals and terrorists on the dark web to creating marketplaces and new authentication systems, Mark has spent his career launching and developing new ventures at startups and Fortune 500s and in academia. He helped to start the Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program, dubbed MIT’s “career success accelerator,” where he teaches annually. At MIT, he received a B.S. in physics, a B.S. in electrical engineering & computer science, and an M.Eng. in electrical engineering & computer science, focusing on cryptography. At Harvard Business School, Mark helped create a platform used to teach finance at prominent business schools. He also works with many non-profits, including Techie Youth and Plant A Million Corals. He was one of the top-ranked ballroom dancers in the country and now lives in New York City, where he is known for his social gatherings, including his annual Halloween party, as well as his diverse cufflink collection. In this episode, Mark shares his “favorite mistake” story about being promised something by board members that was not put in writing. What happened when a new CEO came in? Why was he fired from the product and engineering teams? What adjustments did he make to his approach with later companies? We also talk about questions and topics including: Was not spending on tech another short-sighted decision?Book — lots of examples of mistakes in the book and the class he teachesTell us about the book?? The Career Toolkit, Essential Skills for Success That No One Taught You. — not just about new graduates?Networking mistakes – he met Tim Berners-Lee and blew the opportunity to build a relationshipWhat are some of those essential networking skills?Is it a mistake to sign confidentiality or non-compete clauses?Negotiating mistakes? Don’t name a number first?Ethical situations?Your top 3 Halloween costumes? Find Mark on social media: TwitterFacebookInstagramLinkedIn --- Support this podcast:
Founder & Author Melissa Drake Didn’t Pursue Things That Brought Her Joy
May 16 2022
Founder & Author Melissa Drake Didn’t Pursue Things That Brought Her Joy
Author of The Orgasmic Entrepreneur and more Episode page and links: guest for Episode #164 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Melissa Drake. As the founder of Uncorped Influence, Melissa helps like-minded businesses and individuals find creative solutions and go further than they thought possible. Melissa is the author of three books: The Orgasmic Entrepreneur: Discover the Sweet Spot of Love, Sex, and Business by Simply Being YOU,Sacred Medicine Integration: A Companion Journal Supporting Ceremonial Medicine ExperiencesTranscenDANCE: Lessons From Living, Loving, and Dancing She's also a TEDx Speaker with 25 years climbing the corporate ranks and a decade of entrepreneurial experience. Her TEDx Talk, “The Dance of Collaboration,” presents fresh insights on the benefits of collectively beneficial collaborations. In this episode, Melissa shares her “favorite mistake” story about the pattern of “not taking care of who I am as a person, not pursuing the things that bring me joy.” How did she come to see this pattern? Are mistakes like this just “part of the process” or are they to be avoided? How does she make sure she doesn't fall back into that trap? We also talk about questions and topics including: Were you sort of going through life in autopilot?Finding the fix — looking within or to others?How to make sure you don’t fall back into that trap? As easy as avoiding a corporate job?When things aren’t going well — double down? – Or rest, take time?Did you have any fear that your book title would be a mistake?Is it a book for women? NoNew path started in 2015, laid off from insurance industry, “kick in the pants” she neededWhy was “the ability to truly be me” so important to you?Freedom of expression is one of your most significant valuesCorrelation or causation? — finding “the link between achieving sexual satisfaction and attaining strong business results.” Find Melissa on social media: FacebookYouTubeLinkedInInstagram --- Support this podcast: