CIBC Private Wealth US

CIBC Private Wealth

At CIBC, we provide a full suite of investment management, wealth planning, trustee services and private and commercial banking solutions tailored to your personal and business objectives. read less

Is this a lost year for education? - Q&A with Tim Daly, CEO of EdNavigator
Dec 14 2020
Is this a lost year for education? - Q&A with Tim Daly, CEO of EdNavigator
Read more in the Q&A article with Tim Daly.COVID-19 has upended just about everything, and we’re still working through it—how we work, shop, socialize, learn, worship, receive healthcare and care for others. It has laid bare both strengths and weakness in our institutions, processes and systems. The pandemic has altered life for every age group in almost every way. The coronavirus, after all, is not interested in career dreams, childcare situations or travel plans; it is only interested in host cells. Key innovations that emerged during this pandemic will outlive it. Others are yet to reveal themselves but will surely be part of the legacy of COVID-19. CIBC is committed to providing the perspectives and insights of top thinkers in various fields on what the legacy of COVID-19 could be. In previous installments, we presented views on biotechnology and vaccines, work and careers, artificial intelligence in healthcare during the time of COVID-19, and a CEO’s view on managing healthcare during a pandemic. In this installment, we talk with Tim Daly, CEO of EdNavigator, on the state of education during COVID-19 and how this pandemic is altering learning, children and families.  We first talked with Tim Daly in late July 2020. Four months later, the situation with schools, and the pandemic overall, changed so much that we revisited the topic to bring it up to date. In late July, the U.S. had reported 4.54 million cases and 154,120 deaths from COVID-19, and schools were talking about reopening. In late November, the U.S. reported 13.6 million cases and 269,000 deaths,* and schools opened and closed, reopened, or never opened.
Election implications - Energy sector
Oct 20 2020
Election implications - Energy sector
Patricia Bannan is a managing director and Head of Equities for CIBC Private Wealth Management. In this role, she oversees the firm’s proprietary equity strategies.Lance Marr is a senior investment analyst providing research and analytical support for the CIBC Energy Infrastructure strategy and serves as team lead on the firm’s Clean Energy strategy.The energy sector arguably has the most at stake with a change in the political landscape. As we weigh the scenarios, the status quo appears likely in the event of a Trump win, with a benign regulatory environment, federal support for new energy infrastructure projects and no deals with Iran or Venezuela to bring more oil production on the market. While broadly positive, countering this are expectations for limited production growth as investors demand capital discipline in this low-price environment and state and local governments resisting advancement of new infrastructure projects. When we consider the scenario for the energy sector under a Biden victory, the main focus will be on incentivizing clean energy. The most notable proposal is a $2 trillion climate plan that includes spending on infrastructure and incentives that would serve to accelerate the transition to clean energy. In a Democratic sweep, no doubt the odds of this plan coming to fruition increase. Obvious beneficiaries are companies exposed to renewable and clean energy at the expense of traditional energy companies. With that said, we don’t expect an outright assault on traditional energy companies. Instead, increased regulation on many facets of exploration and production are more likely than something more onerous, like a fracking ban. The result would be less restrictive on production, but with higher costs associated with that production. Furthermore, we may see restrictions on new permits in federally controlled areas, which could shift production to private lands. Other areas of action would be a scrutiny of energy infrastructure projects under a Biden administration. A Biden team would likely also work to ease sanctions with Iran, allowing more oil on the market.
Election implications - Financials sector
Oct 20 2020
Election implications - Financials sector
Patricia Bannan is a managing director and Head of Equities for CIBC Private Wealth Management. In this role, she oversees the firm’s proprietary equity strategies.Brant Houston is a managing director and co-manager of the Disciplined Equity and Income Opportunities Strategies. In respect to financial stocks, the most significant issues related to the election are regulations, tax rates, interest rates and spending/deficits. Under a Trump administration, regulations should continue to ease; under a Biden administration, it would be reasonable to expect additional scrutiny. In either case, the moves would likely be moderate. Tax rates under the current administration are not likely to move dramatically. Banks were a major beneficiary of the Trump tax cuts in 2018, given their domestic focus. Any move to reverse these cuts by a Biden administration would hurt the banks. Also, increases in taxes on long-term capital gains and/or dividend income could impact how and where money is invested. Bringing long-term capital gain taxes to the short-term level may disincentivize long-term investing, raising trading volumes and volatility.  Increased government spending under a Democrat administration on healthcare, infrastructure and climate could be a double-edged sword. On one hand, higher deficits may mean higher interest rates that could make stocks less attractive overall, but help banks’ earnings through higher net interest margin. But it is also important to note that deficits are not exclusively a Democrat issue, as we have seen the deficit balloon under the current administration. Any initiative to provide affordable care to the masses could have an economic benefit if it leads to a stronger financial position for individuals. If consumer credit improves, this would be a net positive for banks. And in terms of infrastructure spending, there could be a significant improvement in the employment situation.
Legacy of COVID-19: AI and Healthcare - Q&A with Daniel Lubin, Founder and CEO, Entry Point Capital
Sep 29 2020
Legacy of COVID-19: AI and Healthcare - Q&A with Daniel Lubin, Founder and CEO, Entry Point Capital
COVID-19 has upended just about everything, and we’re still working through it—how we work, shop, socialize, learn, get healthcare, worship, and care for others. It has laid bare both strengths and weakness in our institutions, processes and systems. The pandemic has altered life for every age group in almost every way. The coronavirus, after all, is not interested in career dreams, childcare situations or travel plans; it is only interested in host cells. Key innovations that emerged during this pandemic will outlive it. Others are yet to reveal themselves but will surely be part of the legacy of COVID-19. CIBC is committed to bringing to you the perspective and insight of top thinkers in various fields on what the legacy of COVID-19 could be. In previous installments, we presented views on biotech and vaccines and on work and careers during the time of COVID-19 (available on our website). In this installment, we discuss artificial intelligence in healthcare with the founder and CEO of an investment management firm that invests in leading-edge health and life sciences companies that are disrupting the healthcare ecosystem. In the future, we’ll present interviews with experts in healthcare management, education, and public health law.Daniel Lubin received a Bachelor of Science in foreign service from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, and a Master of Business Administration with honors from Harvard Business School.
While You Were Sleeping: CIBC’s Foreign Exchange Team Works 24/7 for Clients
Aug 10 2020
While You Were Sleeping: CIBC’s Foreign Exchange Team Works 24/7 for Clients
Buying a house in another country can be a complicated process with many additional considerations and moving parts that can be difficult to navigate.   It is not uncommon for wealth advisors to assist clients with real estate purchases—whether it is to invest in commercial real estate or purchase a second home. More rare, however, is when a client calls and needs help purchasing and closing on a house in another country, prior to undertaking a two-year renovation—all in local currency.  When buying international real estate, there are additional layers of complexity. But that didn’t deter CIBC Private Wealth from rising to the challenge. Instead, Vanesa Ringdahl, senior private banker, and I joined forces with Todd Liska, executive director of CIBC’s Foreign Exchange Group, and Keith Rofrano, head of the firm’s Mid-Market Solutions Group, to provide truly seamless and comprehensive service to help this client buy a new house in London and plan for a multi-year renovation.      The Foreign Exchange team is a part of the company’s U.S. Capital Markets Group. They offer products and services that range from basic foreign exchange to customized hedging and risk management strategies. The team also provides 24-hour liquidity in 30 countries and select emerging market currencies, in addition to a full suite of products that includes spots, forwards, non-deliverable forwards, options and structured solutions.   Such highly complex and technical products and services can be overwhelming for a lot of wealth management clients. But as CIBC is committed to providing integrated and holistic wealth management solutions that can address all of a client’s needs, perhaps a simpler illustration of one of the ways that the Foreign Exchange Team can serve clients is best summed up by a client’s simple request: “Please help me buy a house in London.”    Art Graper is a senior relationship manager with more than 20 years of experience working with high net worth individuals. He specializes in advising clients in the development, execution and monitoring of comprehensive wealth management strategies.