PODCAST

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education

PeerView (PVI) is a leading provider of high-quality, innovative continuing education (CME/CE/CPE and MOC) for clinicians and their interprofessional teams. Combining evidence-based medicine and instructional expertise, PeerView activities improve the knowledge, skills, and strategies that support clinical performance and patient outcomes. PeerView makes its educational programming and expert-led presentations and symposia available through its network of popular podcast channels to support specific specialties and conditions. Each episode includes a link to request CME/CE credit for participation. PeerView is solely responsible for the selection of topics, the preparation of editorial content, and the distribution of all materials it publishes.

Start Here
Michael R. Bishop, MD - CAR-T Cell Therapy: Are You Up to the Challenge? New Evidence and Best Practices Driving Modern Cellular Therapies as a Standard of Care for Leukemia and Lymphoma
2d ago
Michael R. Bishop, MD - CAR-T Cell Therapy: Are You Up to the Challenge? New Evidence and Best Practices Driving Modern Cellular Therapies as a Standard of Care for Leukemia and Lymphoma
Go online to PeerView.com/DRW860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Do you know the best practices for integrating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy into the management of patients with hematologic malignancies? Within the past few years, the indications for CAR-T therapy in leukemic and lymphoid malignancies have expanded significantly and now include acute lymphoblastic leukemia and multiple types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These advances, driven by the use of CD19-directed cell therapy constructs, have spurred numerous ongoing investigations of existing CAR-T therapies in additional CD19-expressing leukemias and lymphomas (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma). Unfortunately, many hematology-oncology and bone marrow transplant BMT professionals have not adapted their practice to reflect the reality of cellular therapy in 2022—from the availability of new constructs with recent regulatory approvals to the management of practical considerations, such as referrals to specialized centers, appropriate follow-up, and toxicity management. This video-based activity from PeerView will deliver expert guidance on the latest safety and efficacy data regarding the use of CAR-T therapy in a variety of settings. The panelists will draw on personal anecdotes and intra-institutional experiences to illustrate best practices for effectively incorporating cellular therapies into treatment plans while addressing practicalities of care, including enrollment of eligible patients in clinical trials testing the next steps with CAR-T therapy. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify patients with leukemia or lymphoma who are eligible for and may benefit from CAR-T therapy based on current indications, clinical evidence, guideline recommendations, and clinical trial opportunities, Implement best practices for integrating CAR-T therapy into the care of patients with leukemia or lymphoma, including referral to specialized treatment centers, clinical trial enrollment, and provision of post-treatment follow-up care, Utilize appropriate AE management strategies for patients with relapsed/refractory leukemia or lymphoma who are experiencing toxicity while receiving CAR-T therapy, including cytokine release syndrome or neurotoxicity.
Michael R. Bishop, MD - CAR-T Cell Therapy: Are You Up to the Challenge? New Evidence and Best Practices Driving Modern Cellular Therapies as a Standard of Care for Leukemia and Lymphoma
2d ago
Michael R. Bishop, MD - CAR-T Cell Therapy: Are You Up to the Challenge? New Evidence and Best Practices Driving Modern Cellular Therapies as a Standard of Care for Leukemia and Lymphoma
Go online to PeerView.com/DRW860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Do you know the best practices for integrating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy into the management of patients with hematologic malignancies? Within the past few years, the indications for CAR-T therapy in leukemic and lymphoid malignancies have expanded significantly and now include acute lymphoblastic leukemia and multiple types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These advances, driven by the use of CD19-directed cell therapy constructs, have spurred numerous ongoing investigations of existing CAR-T therapies in additional CD19-expressing leukemias and lymphomas (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma). Unfortunately, many hematology-oncology and bone marrow transplant BMT professionals have not adapted their practice to reflect the reality of cellular therapy in 2022—from the availability of new constructs with recent regulatory approvals to the management of practical considerations, such as referrals to specialized centers, appropriate follow-up, and toxicity management. This video-based activity from PeerView will deliver expert guidance on the latest safety and efficacy data regarding the use of CAR-T therapy in a variety of settings. The panelists will draw on personal anecdotes and intra-institutional experiences to illustrate best practices for effectively incorporating cellular therapies into treatment plans while addressing practicalities of care, including enrollment of eligible patients in clinical trials testing the next steps with CAR-T therapy. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify patients with leukemia or lymphoma who are eligible for and may benefit from CAR-T therapy based on current indications, clinical evidence, guideline recommendations, and clinical trial opportunities, Implement best practices for integrating CAR-T therapy into the care of patients with leukemia or lymphoma, including referral to specialized treatment centers, clinical trial enrollment, and provision of post-treatment follow-up care, Utilize appropriate AE management strategies for patients with relapsed/refractory leukemia or lymphoma who are experiencing toxicity while receiving CAR-T therapy, including cytokine release syndrome or neurotoxicity.
Leslie Kean, MD, PhD - Overcoming the Challenges of Acute and Chronic GVHD: The Integration of Novel Therapies Into Modern Management Protocols
2d ago
Leslie Kean, MD, PhD - Overcoming the Challenges of Acute and Chronic GVHD: The Integration of Novel Therapies Into Modern Management Protocols
Go online to PeerView.com/KPJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Recent clinical developments have transformed the management of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and have the potential to increase access to transplants and improve post-HCT outcomes. These advances are centered on the emergence and continued research of several novel modalities, including the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib, JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib, and the T-cell co-stimulation blocking agent abatacept, as well as additional novel strategies being tested in a range of acute and chronic GVHD settings. In this activity from the 2022 Tandem meetings, our expert panelists distill the current evidence on novel therapeutics in the prevention and treatment of GVHD; throughout, they illustrate how and when to integrate novel therapeutics into care, provide guidance on how to prepare for emerging strategies, and offer practical takeaways on the changing nature of GVHD management. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Discuss current evidence supporting the use of novel therapeutics as prophylactic or treatment options for acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the post-transplant setting, including JAK and BTK inhibitors, T-cell blocking agents, α1-antitrypsin, and ROCK inhibitors, among others, Develop management plans informed by evidence and practice guidelines that incorporate novel therapeutics into the management of acute GVHD, Integrate novel and emerging therapies into management plans for the management of chronic GVHD, including novel combinatorial strategies and/or options for second-line management.
Kurt A. Schalper, MD, PhD - Decoding the Latest Evidence and Practical Recommendations on Biomarker Testing for New Therapeutic Options Targeting HER2, HER3, and TROP2 in Solid Tumors
2d ago
Kurt A. Schalper, MD, PhD - Decoding the Latest Evidence and Practical Recommendations on Biomarker Testing for New Therapeutic Options Targeting HER2, HER3, and TROP2 in Solid Tumors
Go online to PeerView.com/EZK860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Detecting molecular alterations driving the development of specific cancers and then targeting these alterations with matched therapies or combinatorial approaches is now the standard of care for many cancers. HER2 alterations have been identified as key therapeutic targets in breast, gastrointestinal, lung, and other cancers, and targeting these alterations with antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs), antibodies, more specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and bispecific antibodies are improving outcomes. In addition to HER2, HER3 represents an emerging target in several cancer types for which novel targeted therapies are being developed, and targeting TROP2 is showing promise as well. Given these treatment advances, biomarker testing to identify patients who may benefit the most from HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-targeted therapies has never been more important. This activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, will provide essential updates and practical guidance regarding biomarker testing and individualized treatment of patients with HER2-altered cancers, and novel targets such as HER3 and TROP2 will be explored as well. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify patients with solid tumors with HER2, HER3, and TROP2 alterations using established and emerging testing approaches, Incorporate therapies directed at HER2, HER3, and TROP2 into the treatment of patients with tumors with targetable alterations based on the characteristics, mechanisms of action, and latest clinical evidence on approved and emerging therapies, Develop individualized management plans that leverage predictive testing, the most recent clinical findings, and multidisciplinary team-based care in accordance with the latest treatment guidelines and recommendations for patients with solid tumors with HER2, HER3, and TROP2 alterations, either in the context of clinical practice or clinical trials.
Stephen V. Liu, MD - Find the Targets, Treat With Precision: Modern Principles and New Advances in Biomarker-Driven Lung Cancer Care
1w ago
Stephen V. Liu, MD - Find the Targets, Treat With Precision: Modern Principles and New Advances in Biomarker-Driven Lung Cancer Care
Go online to PeerView.com/UTP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In the modern era of precision oncology, comprehensive biomarker profiling of complex and heterogeneous tumors such as non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is essential for determining the best therapeutic approach for each patient. Patients with lung cancer who have targetable genomic alterations can derive remarkable benefit from targeted therapies, and the list of relevant targets and matched therapies continues to expand, including in early-stage disease settings. Unfortunately, molecular testing rates remain woefully inadequate, and even when testing is performed, many patients are not receiving optimally matched targeted therapy based on their tumor type. This PeerView educational video based on a recent live event and developed in collaboration with the LUNGevity Foundation brings leading lung cancer experts together to go beyond the basics and help navigate the increasing complexity of biomarker testing and targeted therapy in lung cancer. Expert discussions are framed with patient perspectives and illustrative case scenarios to highlight strategies for improving team-based collaboration, patient engagement, health equity, and biomarker-informed management plans to provide the best possible care to all patients. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Discuss the heterogeneity of NSCLC and mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety of targeted therapies for established, new, and emerging molecular alterations in NSCLC, Apply current guidelines and best practices for biomarker testing to help inform targeted treatment decisions for patients with NSCLC, Integrate targeted therapies into individualized treatment plans for eligible patients with NSCLC in clinical practice or clinical trials, considering biomarker status; current evidence and guidelines; multidisciplinary perspectives; and patient needs, values, and preferences, Implement multidisciplinary and patient-centric approaches to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis, appropriate biomarker testing, individualized treatment, and equitable care of all patients with NSCLC.
Matthew R. Smith, MD, PhD - Realizing the Potential of Novel Treatment Intensification Strategies for Metastatic Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The Experts’ Take on Key Clinical Evidence, Practical Considerations, and Best Practices for Individualized, Patient-Centered Care
1w ago
Matthew R. Smith, MD, PhD - Realizing the Potential of Novel Treatment Intensification Strategies for Metastatic Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The Experts’ Take on Key Clinical Evidence, Practical Considerations, and Best Practices for Individualized, Patient-Centered Care
Go online to PeerView.com/UDM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The therapeutic landscape for metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC) has evolved rapidly in recent years, and research endeavors continue to expand treatment options with significant implications for patients. In addition to the approval of multiple second-generation androgen deprivation therapies (ADTs), current clinical trials are investigating novel targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and combination approaches in different disease settings. Furthermore, when managing patients with mCSPC, clinicians must consider established, newly approved, and emerging therapies, as well as individual patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. Given the wealth of new options, how do clinicians determine the best treatment course for each patient? Answers to this and other thought-provoking queries are provided in this educational activity based on a recent live symposium, as a panel of prostate cancer experts examine the latest clinical data for novel and emerging therapeutic approaches and discuss evidence-based strategies for individualizing treatment for each patient with mCSPC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Assess the rationale and clinical evidence for novel therapeutic approaches for patients with mCSPC, such as the addition of novel androgen axis inhibitors or docetaxel to ADT, Develop optimal, individualized treatment plans for patients with mCSPC that incorporate novel therapeutics as appropriate, taking into consideration individual patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors, Apply evidence- and team-based strategies to proactively mitigate and manage treatment-related adverse events that may occur in patients with mCSPC who are receiving novel therapeutics as part of their care, Employ effective strategies to engage patients with mCSPC in shared decision-making, with the goal of maximizing patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and treatment adherence.
Petros Grivas, MD, PhD - Blazing the Trail Forward in the Therapeutic Management of Bladder Cancer: Expert Insights on Incorporating the Latest Evidence and Treatment Advancements Into Practice Across the Disease Continuum
Jun 24 2022
Petros Grivas, MD, PhD - Blazing the Trail Forward in the Therapeutic Management of Bladder Cancer: Expert Insights on Incorporating the Latest Evidence and Treatment Advancements Into Practice Across the Disease Continuum
Go online to PeerView.com/MWV860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. With the recent approval of multiple novel therapeutics for patients with bladder cancer, oncology professionals have increased opportunities to improve outcomes in a variety of settings. However, not all patients are being given these promising new treatments. Management protocols often do not include the latest strategies, and clinicians often have several questions about incorporating these new agents, which include bladder-sparing options, immune checkpoint inhibitors, targeted therapies (FGFR inhibitors), and antibody-drug conjugates, into clinical practice. For instance, will the presence of immune-related adverse events (irAEs) in some patients linger after the end of therapy and limit the possible subsequent use of ADCs or FGFR inhibitors? To answer these questions, experts in bladder cancer highlight strategies for optimal care of patients in light of current evidence on and indications for use of immune, targeted, and antibody-based therapies and guidance on safely integrating these agents into treatment plans. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the current roles, mechanisms of action, and key evidence pertaining to novel systemic therapies for patients with localized or metastatic bladder cancer, such as immunotherapies, small molecule targeted therapies, and antibody-drug conjugates, among others, Plan personalized treatment algorithms for patients with localized or metastatic urothelial cancer that incorporate novel and emerging therapies, updated guideline recommendations, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors, Implement evidence-based strategies and expert recommendations to prevent, mitigate and/or manage treatment-related adverse events that may occur among patients receiving novel systemic therapies for bladder cancer.
Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD - Revolutionizing the Standard of NF1 Care: Insights on Innovative MEK-Inhibitor Options for NF1-Associated PNs
Jun 16 2022
Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD - Revolutionizing the Standard of NF1 Care: Insights on Innovative MEK-Inhibitor Options for NF1-Associated PNs
Go online to PeerView.com/YBF860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an incurable and progressive genetic disorder caused by a partial or complete loss of function of the NF1 tumor suppressor gene, resulting in elevated RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS/MAPK) pathway signaling and the potential development of subsequent NF1-associated tumors. Given current breakthroughs, including the emergence of MEK inhibitors, the ongoing challenge is how to effectively employ modern therapeutics in the management of patients with NF1 tumors, particularly pediatric patients. This case-based video discussion, based on a PeerView live “Seminars & Practicum” CME event, will offer an expert-guided review of the challenges inherent to the management of NF1-associated tumors and provide practical guidance on state-of-the-art solutions and the role that MEK-targeting agents can play in patient management. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the genetic etiology, diverse clinical symptomatology, and diagnostic criteria of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Cite the current evidence from pivotal clinical trials on MEK inhibitors and other targeted therapies for the treatment of NF1-related PNs and other tumors in pediatric populations, Select personalized treatment plans using MEK inhibitors and other targeted therapies in pediatric populations with NF1-related plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) and other tumors based on prognostic information, safety considerations, and the latest evidence and guideline recommendations, Develop a management plan for the unique spectrum of adverse events associated with novel therapeutics including MEK inhibitors in pediatric patients with NF1-associated tumors.
Nancy P. Moldawer, RN, MSN - Aligning Nursing Care Strategies With Evolving Patient Needs in RCC: Interprofessional Insights on Optimizing Outcomes With Novel Targeted and Immune-Based Therapies
Jun 16 2022
Nancy P. Moldawer, RN, MSN - Aligning Nursing Care Strategies With Evolving Patient Needs in RCC: Interprofessional Insights on Optimizing Outcomes With Novel Targeted and Immune-Based Therapies
Go online to PeerView.com/ASX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Do you know the best strategies for integrating novel therapeutic approaches into the care of your patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC)? With the rapid expansion of effective treatments, oncology nurses have more opportunities than ever before to provide support and guidance that favorably influences outcomes for their patients with advanced kidney cancer. However, research has shown that many patients are not receiving individualized, evidence-based, and guideline-concordant treatment and those patients who are receiving new therapies are not receiving appropriate nurse-led care. Join PeerView for an interprofessional case-based activity featuring two nurse professionals and an oncologist to get insight on bringing treatment advances, including immune checkpoint inhibitors and combination strategies, into clinical practice. The expert panel will provide learners with a strong understanding of how current therapeutic regimens fit within the current management paradigm. Participants will also be offered tools to help them master practical aspects tied to effective use of therapies and tips on how to create optimized interprofessional care that empowers patients to participate in shared decision-making, provide multidisciplinary AE management, and support clinical trial enrollment for eligible patients. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Appraise recent data on therapeutic advances and updated practice standards, including the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors, TKIs, and combination approaches utilizing these agents, in the management of RCC across the disease spectrum, Update nursing care plans to incorporate practical and team-based strategies to promptly identify, mitigate, and manage AEs associated with novel systemic therapy options for RCC, Develop a team-based education plan focused on novel systemic therapy options for patients with RCC that includes pertinent information on therapeutic expectations, safety considerations, sequential treatments, and clinical trial opportunities.
Nasser Altorki, MD - How to Integrate Perioperative Immunotherapy Into Multimodal Treatment Plans to Improve Outcomes in Resectable NSCLC
Jun 14 2022
Nasser Altorki, MD - How to Integrate Perioperative Immunotherapy Into Multimodal Treatment Plans to Improve Outcomes in Resectable NSCLC
Go online to PeerView.com/GWF860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are swiftly transitioning from the metastatic to the early-stage setting and transforming the multimodal management of resectable stage I-III NSCLC. Remarkable data have emerged from several immunotherapy trials in perioperative settings and FDA has granted new regulatory approvals for both neoadjuvant and adjuvant immunotherapy regimens, effectively establishing new standards of care in early-stage NSCLC. Still, many questions remain on how to transition these exciting advances to practice and improved patient outcomes in real-world setting. What are the pros/cons of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant immunotherapy, and how should the best approach be determined for each patient? What is the optimal timing and duration of therapy, and how should responses be assessed? What adverse events should be anticipated, and are perioperative complications higher? These and other essential topics are addressed by two leading experts in thoracic surgery in this PeerView educational activity based on a recent live event. Watch this stimulating discussion of practice-changing data on perioperative immunotherapy, surgical implications and applicability to practice, and how to make the most of ICIs as part of multimodal management of resectable NSCLC. Watch intriguing debates framed by real cases and discussion points selected to highlight the practicalities and challenges of integrating perioperative immunotherapy into practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Discuss the mechanistic and biologic rationale for using immunotherapy as a component of multimodal therapy in early-stage lung cancer and key clinical trials evaluating immunotherapies in these settings, Summarize the latest findings on surrogate endpoints, such as pathologic response criteria, to assess treatment response and evaluate the prognosis of patients with resectable lung cancer who are receiving immunotherapy, Identify patients with resectable NSCLC who are eligible for perioperative immunotherapy, considering the benefits/limitations and surgical implications based on an understanding of the latest evidence and persisting misperceptions, Integrate best practices for multidisciplinary communication and collaboration to enhance appropriate incorporation of immunotherapies into multimodal treatment plans for eligible patients with stage I-III resectable NSCLC.
Ashish M. Kamat, MD, MBBS - Multidisciplinary Guidance on Translating the Latest Therapeutic Advances Into Patient Care for Early to Advanced Bladder Cancer: Clinical Consults and Cases From the Community
Jun 14 2022
Ashish M. Kamat, MD, MBBS - Multidisciplinary Guidance on Translating the Latest Therapeutic Advances Into Patient Care for Early to Advanced Bladder Cancer: Clinical Consults and Cases From the Community
Go online to PeerView.com/VSV860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The recent transformation of the bladder cancer therapeutic landscape includes the PD-1/PD-L1–targeting immune checkpoint inhibitors for advanced/metastatic bladder cancer, erdafitinib for FGFR mutation–positive bladder tumors, and the antibody–drug conjugates enfortumab vedotin and sacituzumab govitecan in the post–immune checkpoint inhibitor setting. Utilizing these agents in localized disease settings has led to the emergence of novel bladder-sparing and perioperative approaches, including the first regulatory approval of adjuvant immunotherapy in high-risk muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In light of these developments, the challenge for urology professionals is how to best blend the diverse clinical evidence for these agents with the realities of real-world cancer care. This PeerView activity, developed in collaboration with the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, will guide learners through the modern realities of managing bladder cancer across disease and treatment settings. Realistic and diverse patient cases will be directly linked to mini lectures in which bladder cancer experts will interpret clinically meaningful evidence on current and emerging therapeutic options and offer guidance on the clinical integration of these therapies into personalized management plans. Prepare to apply practical lessons stemming from the evidence related to novel systemic therapies, their applications in metastatic bladder cancer, and their emerging uses in locally advanced, resectable, or non–muscle-invasive disease. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Implement guideline-concordant genetic and molecular assessment as part of the routine management of patients with bladder cancer while considering the current therapeutic roles and mechanistic rationales of novel systemic therapies across bladder cancer settings and patient populations (eg, localized or metastatic), Select patients with early-stage bladder cancer who are eligible for recently approved and emerging therapeutic strategies in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings (eg, NMIBC and MIBC) based on recent approvals, clinical evidence, and ongoing trials, Develop personalized, evidence-based treatment plans for patients with advanced/metastatic bladder cancer that incorporate new agents and combinations (including in the context of a clinical trial), expert recommendations, genetic/molecular status, and principles of shared decision-making and multidisciplinary collaboration, Employ strategies to facilitate early recognition, reporting, and appropriate management of toxicities associated with newer systemic therapy options for bladder cancer in collaboration with the broader care team, patients, and caregivers.
Amy Goodrich, CRNP - Hope Is Here in CLL: Oncology Nurse Strategies for Delivering Effective, Compassionate, and Modern Care to Patients
Jun 14 2022
Amy Goodrich, CRNP - Hope Is Here in CLL: Oncology Nurse Strategies for Delivering Effective, Compassionate, and Modern Care to Patients
Go online to PeerView.com/QWZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you prepared for the current clinical challenges of CLL—including in areas where nurse professionals can have a decisive influence on patient education and the safe delivery of care? This “Clinical Consults” activity, developed in collaboration with the CLL Society, represents a resource for developing modern management strategies in a changing and complicated therapeutic landscape. Throughout, PeerView’s expert speakers present nurse-to-nurse, case-based education and share clinical tools designed to facilitate the effective use of innovative therapeutics in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) across multiple treatment settings, with the ultimate goal of enhancing patient outcomes. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Cite the clinical signs of symptomatic disease, relevant prognostic factors, patient- and disease-related features, and clinical evidence that can inform treatment selection with innovative therapeutic classes in CLL, including BTK and BCL-2 inhibitors, novel antibodies, and cellular therapy, Provide counseling to patients with CLL in order to clarify therapeutic expectations, safety considerations, appropriate dosing, sequential therapy, and differences among novel agent classes, Address dosing and safety considerations for patients with CLL receiving BTK or BCL-2 inhibitors, novel antibodies, or other innovative approaches to treatment.
Prof. Solange Peters, MD, PhD - Parsing the Practicalities of Pathologic Response Assessment After Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy to Facilitate Progress in Early-Stage Cancers
May 30 2022
Prof. Solange Peters, MD, PhD - Parsing the Practicalities of Pathologic Response Assessment After Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy to Facilitate Progress in Early-Stage Cancers
Go online to PeerView.com/HCZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) changed the standards of care in the treatment of advanced solid tumors and are now rapidly transitioning into early-stage, curative-intent settings. New regulatory approvals have been recently granted for several ICIs as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments for different cancers, and many more studies are under way. This shift is truly needed, as outcomes had plateaued in resectable cancers. To overcome the challenges of conducting ICI clinical trials in early-stage cancers and facilitate more rapid progress, the need for new surrogate measures of efficacy has been widely recognized. Pathologic response assessment of resection specimens after neoadjuvant therapy has emerged as one such new tool, and there is accumulating evidence supporting its relevance and advantages. However, some unanswered questions remain, and there has been a lack of clarity on how to define, score, and interpret pathologic response, although efforts are ongoing to refine and standardize these measurements. This PeerView educational activity, based on a recent live symposium, provides cutting-edge updates on novel surrogate measures of efficacy of immunotherapies in resectable cancers and practical guidance for using these new tools in clinical trials and practice, with an emphasis on pathologic response assessment after neoadjuvant immunotherapy. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Discuss the definition of pathologic response and the biologic and historic rationale, clinical evidence, benefits, and limitations of its use as an early surrogate endpoint of response to neoadjuvant immunotherapy in various solid tumors, Implement different scoring systems available for assessing pathologic response, accounting for practical considerations and complexities, including their accuracy, standardization, reproducibility, and other nuances, to guide treatment decisions in the context of a clinical trial or clinical practice across tumor types, Integrate appropriate strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration and coordination among all members of the healthcare team to effectively leverage pathologic response assessment after neoadjuvant immunotherapy as a surrogate marker in clinical trials and to direct clinical decision-making in practice.
Linda Ahn, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCNP - Tackling the Practicalities of Antibody–Drug Conjugate Therapy for Solid Tumors: Improving Clinical Care With HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-Targeted Therapies
May 30 2022
Linda Ahn, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCNP - Tackling the Practicalities of Antibody–Drug Conjugate Therapy for Solid Tumors: Improving Clinical Care With HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-Targeted Therapies
Go online to PeerView.com/PFM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a unique class of anticancer therapies showing promise in a broad range of solid tumors. ADCs targeting HER2 and TROP2 have already garnered regulatory approvals in some cancer types, with more trials under way, and therapies against other new targets, including HER3, are being explored as well. This PeerView educational activity based on a recent live symposium focuses on the implications of recent advances with ADCs and provides guidance for oncology nurses and other key members of the cancer care team on their clinical integration in a new era of targeted therapy across solid tumors. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the properties, mechanisms of action, latest clinical evidence, and current and potential clinical roles of validated and emerging HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-targeted antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in different solid tumors, Employ evidence-based and team-based strategies to mitigate and manage treatment-related adverse events in patients with cancer receiving HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-targeted ADC therapy, Provide appropriate education, guidance, and counseling to patients with solid tumors on the role, optimal use, and therapeutic and safety considerations of approved and emerging HER2-, HER3-, and TROP2-targeted ADCs within the context of clinical practice or through clinical participation.
Liana G. Apostolova, MS, MD, FAAN - Accelerating Progress in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: How Can We Achieve Timely and Accurate Neuropathological Diagnosis and Precision Management of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?
May 27 2022
Liana G. Apostolova, MS, MD, FAAN - Accelerating Progress in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: How Can We Achieve Timely and Accurate Neuropathological Diagnosis and Precision Management of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?
Go online to PeerView.com/JYU860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating, progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting 10% of people over age 65 and increasing in global prevalence. Recent advances in disease-modifying therapies have opened the door to the possibility of treatment approaches that can slow or prevent disease progression and improve patient outcomes. Now, with several anti–amyloid beta (Aβ) monoclonal antibodies in late-stage development, there is hope for families, clinicians, and researchers. The greatest likelihood of treatment success lies in timely diagnosis and early intervention. In this activity, based on a live symposium held at the AD/PD 2022 International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases in Barcelona, Spain, an international panel of experts will discuss the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of AD and present the latest evidence on validated and emerging biomarkers that can aid in the early diagnosis of AD. They will also explore the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety data for promising disease-modifying therapies in development for the treatment of AD. Using patient case examples to frame the discussion, the expert faculty panel will provide practical guidance on how clinicians can effectively and safely integrate new diagnostic tools and disease-modifying therapies into clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the rationale for identifying patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) early in the disease course, Utilize validated neuroimaging techniques and molecular biomarkers to make early and accurate neuropathological diagnoses of AD, Select appropriate AD patients who may benefit from novel disease-modifying therapies based on an understanding of their respective mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety profiles.