DC Power Hour

Eagle Eye Power Solutions

Welcome to “DC Power Hour”– the show where we will discuss everything related to – you guessed it – critical DC power solutions. Twice a month, we will get together and have a little fun talking with experts about the issues that are important to us and our industry. At Eagle Eye, we are huge on sharing knowledge, and our goal is to both educate and entertain our audience with this podcast. So, charge up, power on, or do whatever it is you have to do to get yourself excited for “DC Power Hour”!

How (Un)Reliable is the Electric Grid?
Jul 28 2022
How (Un)Reliable is the Electric Grid?
The Battery Blarney duo welcomes Al Warner to talk about the unreliability of the electric grid. The electric grid is one of the most important infrastructure elements in the United States. It's a system of interconnected power plants and transmission lines that delivers electricity to homes and businesses. The grid is also one of the most complex systems in the world, and it's susceptible to a variety of risks. Grid operators must constantly balance supply and demand to maintain a consistent flow of electricity, and they must also contend with severe weather, cyber attacks, and other threats. As a result, the grid is not always reliable. Outages can occur for a variety of reasons, and they can have major consequences. That's why it's important for grid operators to continuously monitor conditions and take steps to mitigate risks. By doing so, they can help ensure that the electric grid remains reliable for the millions of Americans who rely on it every day. Highlights: 02:54 - The electric grid today is like playing grid Jenga. If you pull out specific pieces of the grid it will all fall down. 12:21 - If I want a fast recharge I`ve got to have a 250kw charger for one vehicle. This is the problem for the electrical grid, it cannot support this kind of spontaneous step load. 23:29 - This country really needs a brand new backbone. If these people are serious about the future being electrical we need a whole new backbone. 39:41 - The rail system is probably the most economical way to transport goods but the trucking industry took over and the prices were so low but now with the price of fuel, train transporting of goods is becoming more competitive I think. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Applying Stationary Battery Training in the Field
Jul 13 2022
Applying Stationary Battery Training in the Field
The Battery Blarney duo of George and Allen welcome Joey Davis and Ed Rafter to talk about applying Stationary Battery Training in the Field and Battery Monitoring. Battery training is important for a number of reasons.  First, it helps to ensure that employees are properly trained in the use of batteries. Second, it helps to improve the safety of employees by teaching them how to properly handle and use batteries. Third, it helps to improve the efficiency of battery usage by teaching employees how to best maintain and operate batteries. Finally, it helps to improve the overall quality of the battery monitoring industry by teaching employees how to better identify and resolve issues that may arise with batteries. By providing employees with proper training, companies can help to improve the quality of their products and services and ensure that their customers are satisfied with the results. Highlights: 02:08 - They badly need training in order to bring people up to speed. This is probably the key to everything that we do. 05:51 - We have some guides coming out which I think will be great tutorials towards helping people and those folks responsible for batteries. 18:35 - One of the things that I had found, especially when I go out into the field and do training, not only are you there as a teacher but you end up also being a consultant. 20:13 - It takes time to see things happen and learn things and all that you can't just walk in and say hey, I go to a training class so I know it all now. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Reboot: Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Current Power Grid
Jun 22 2022
Reboot: Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Current Power Grid
This June, as we look back on our first 20 episodes, we wanted to revisit two of our favorite topics so far - "Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources" and "Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Current Power Grid." Please enjoy, and we'll be back with all new episodes in July. In today's episode of DC Power Hour, it is the 1st year anniversary of the Texas power outage. This episode will focus on how extreme weather and the stress on the power grid affects everyone. They kick off the episode with a discussion on climate change and the lack of national support for power plants. They also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of renewable energy. They explore the best practices of European countries and how they can help if applied in the US. This is an episode rich with great thoughts between experts and some things to consider on energy moving forward. *The views expressed in this podcast represent the individuals who share them and are not necessarily those of Eagle Eye Power Solutions, LLC.* Highlights: 06:07 We've got what we've got coming. This really is a perfect storm when you think about it. We’ve got an aging infrastructure, really aging infrastructure, we've got aging power plants, money hasn't been spent, we have changing weather patterns, we also have a drive to rely more and more on renewable energy.  20:05 The first major thing we get changed is that people need to start looking at how the return of investment will be the improvement in reliability at less cost and loss of service.  26:57 One of the things in the United States that is different from Europe is their electrical reliability is a lot more superior, not because they do things better, not because they have better people, but because a lot of their utilities are underground. 35:55 I've been a proponent of micro nuclear plants for quite a while. You move the power source closer to the end user.  37:50  One thing I've always been curious about, maybe it's just me but, why isn't there more push for hydro?  42:43 All batteries using anodes and cathodes are effectively a metal of some kind because that's the way the atomic system works; the only way you get free electrons is to have a conductor and they're all metals. In order to build a lot of this stuff your gonna be doing a lot of mining, and isn't that pollution? 47:42  When it comes to transmission and getting power to the coast and you’re talking about these micro grids. I really think that it's a potential path because some of the biggest things we see are like the “not in my backyard” movement . Contact information: (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Reboot:  Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources
Jun 9 2022
Reboot: Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources
This June, as we look back on our first 20 episodes, we wanted to revisit two of our favorite topics so far - "Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources" and "Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Current Power Grid." Please enjoy, and we'll be back with all new episodes in July. In this first episode, we learned about renewables and alternative energy sources. In the Battery Blarney segment, industry experts George Pedersen and Allan Byrne dive into talking about different topics from solar farms, a combination of other sources, alternatives and much more.  In the second segment, we are joined by Jack Andreasen, who is the Manager of Industrial Decarbonization Policy at  (Breakthrough) ( Energy). He touches on topics regarding building decarbonization, increase in transmission deployment, transmission lines and more.  Episode Highlights 02:49 If you look at some reports, renewables are going to take over a whole generation of the power grid, which is not possible at the moment.  05:13 I think the thing that most people don't understand is that when you generate electricity, when you cause that electro reaction, the way you start moving atoms around charging atoms, so you get charged ions to create your power, you can’t get rid of it, it's got to be used. 08:14 The environmentalist wants all this solar power and wind power. What's that actually doing to the environment? 13:57 In most places in the world, if you have a combination of both wind and solar, you get a much more consistent power source. You combine the two together. 20:23 I think it's going to be a mixture of everything, we're going to have renewable energy, whether we like it or not. 23:06 Education is something as you're realizing, something very dear to my heart at the present moment, but it’s hard work because people come in with preconceived ideas now and somehow, for some reason, scientific facts are no longer the driving force behind anything. 35:18 We don't have to build huge networks or distribution to try and support it because one of the things that people should realize is that the network power in those transmission lines that we crisscross the countryside, are also very vulnerable to attack.  39:58 The problem is that we live in a world today where we want a simple answer that will cover everything and that's not the way the world is, it's never been the way the world is. 47:23 One of the advantages of gases is that it’s easier to transport than anything else. 58:34 We work with Congress, we work with the private sector, we work with other NGOs and think tanks to develop strategies and policy recommendations around ways we think we could decarbonize those various industries. 01:02:55 One thing that could really unlock the potential across the country is an increase in transmission deployment. 01:05:27 Transmission has been, and will continue to be a huge obstacle in renewable energy deployment going forward. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
What's Happened to the Quality of Stand-By Power Installations?
May 25 2022
What's Happened to the Quality of Stand-By Power Installations?
Stand-by power installations are a crucial part of any business or facility. They provide emergency power during outages, ensuring that critical systems keep running. However, many businesses and facilities are finding that the quality of their stand-by power installations is declining. What's causing this decline, and what can be done to improve the situation? The Battery Blarney duo of George and Allen welcome Peter DeMar, the person that led the team that developed the VRLA battery capacity recovery process named the IOVR or IOVR+ process. These processes were created to help users that were experiencing early capacity or capability losses with their VRLA batteries. It has been proven that by utilizing these processes that any structurally sound battery that has suffered from premature capacity failure can be improved, and in most cases restored to a fully functional battery system. Of course, the process must be performed properly and completely to obtain the maximum benefit available. Highlight: 03:08 – A lot of it is due to the fact of this continual pressure to get the job done. We've given you two days to do this but nobody went to look at the site to discover what has to be done. That's probably the biggest problem we have. 11:44 – A lot of the installation of DC systems is now being left to electrical contractors and they have absolutely no experience to actually install a wire in a DC system. 20:02 – It`s critically important to label the hands of the cable, so that we can find which is what. 45:03 – I don’t see it being followed throughout the industry so maybe that is one of the things that we need to look out for, training of the various technicians at various skill levels. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail Connect with Peter DeMar (LinkedIn)
Battery Monitoring and Data Analysis
May 11 2022
Battery Monitoring and Data Analysis
The Battery Blarney duo of George and Allen welcome Fran Losey, a critical power and power quality professional who has a disciplined military background. His specialties include critical power systems, power distribution, power quality, battery systems, battery monitoring, and advanced analysis of battery systems for risk reduction and lifecycle management. To many, the battery is a mystery. What are they? What do they do? How do they work? In this episode, we'll demystify batteries and take a look at how to monitor them in order to get the most out of your system. By understanding battery behaviors and taking proactive steps to managing them, you can mitigate problems before they arise and maximize uptime. We'll also take a look at some data analysis techniques that can help you understand your battery's health. Highlight: 01:30 – One of the craziest things about life is there's absolutely nothing that we do or are involved in that there`s not at some point involved a battery to try and keep it operational. 09:18 – Today it is very easy to collect that data, modern electronics are wonderful. You can measure almost anything you want to, and you can collect data. The big problem is how do you make sure that data you`re collecting are accurate? 17:40 – The measurement techniques, because they`re all not the same and with that you have to have a fairly decent understanding of what you are looking at and what the risks are. 28:46 – Everything is a compromise. What you have to do is to say which of the compromises you`re willing to accept and what you`re going to do about it. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail Connect with Fran Losey (LinkedIn)
How to Properly Charge a Stationary Battery
Apr 6 2022
How to Properly Charge a Stationary Battery
The Battery Blarney duo of George and Allen welcome Ed Rogers, National Service Support Manager at EnerSys, to talk about battery charging. The topic of proper battery charging is one of Allen’s passions and they discuss what happens when you undercharge and overcharge a battery.  All batteries are not equal and the discussion covers temperature compensation and the  difficulty of determining the state of charge of a battery. They talk about freshening the charge per the manufacturer’s guidelines, lack of education on why it’s necessary to follow those guidelines, and the importance of optimizing battery life. Highlights: 01:25 One thing I found in common with warranty claims, in over 50% of them, the paperwork that accompanied them showed the batteries were not being properly charged. 05:34 Corporate training teaches people how to do something, but it doesn’t teach them why they’re doing it. Basically education comes in two forms: you’ve got to educate the people, and then you can tell them how to do something. I think that’s one of the biggest problems we have at the present moment that people have been asked to do things and they don’t understand why they’re doing them.  15:30 Overcharging has a much more devastating effect. When you overcharge a battery, you’re shoving in more current than the battery can handle. Current causes heat. 23:49 The battery itself, as it’s manufactured and leaves the factory, it’s only ever going to be in two states after that. It’s always going to be in discharge or it’s always going to be in charge. 52:18 We’ve known the use of zinc and manganese and nickel. They’ve been available almost since the start of battery technology, but they had chemical things that made them difficult to use. Some of that’s been overcome now. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Ohmic Values and Battery Testing
Mar 2 2022
Ohmic Values and Battery Testing
In today’s episode, we spread deep knowledge in the battery industry and look at how ohmic measurement and ohmic values play a crucial role in battery testing. The Battery Blarney Duo, George and Allen, discuss data trending, the most significant things to look at when monitoring a battery, the value of low capacity cells, and acceptance of ohmic value. In the second segment, they are joined by industry expert and friend, Peter DeMar of Battery Research and Testing for almost 40 years.  Peter shared his background and they discuss artificial intelligence, indication of battery health, place for ohmic testing for batteries with advanced chemistry, ohmic testers and UPS. Highlights: 16:14 You’ve got to look at everything. This is probably my biggest concern when we talk about ohmic measurement is this almost pathological belief that that is the only value that matters. We have to go back to the original battery technicians, think about what they did. They’re looking at everything, they are looking at temperature, they are looking at the voltage. 21:37 You need some very accurate instrument tape devices in order to measure those voltages and also the problem of noise at the same time because batteries are not as quiet as people think they are. 22:47 Why do we have to have this value, why must we have limits? Eventually I do believe we will see artificial intelligence get involved because AI doesn’t need limits, it recognizes those changes and variations. 41:37 In improvements or inclusions or whatever the right word is. With artificial intelligence and machines and programs in understanding what they’re looking at we’re going to make improvements. The information or analysis coming out of them might be more beneficial. Contact information: (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Grid in America
Feb 16 2022
Extreme Weather and Other Pitfalls of the Grid in America
The world is changing - is our electrical grid prepared to handle it? In today's episode of DC Power Hour, George, Allen and the guys acknowledge the anniversary of the Texas power outage last February by discussing how extreme weather and the stress on the power grid affects everyone. From extreme weather events to the lack of funding and personnel for utilities, the group discusses the complexity of issues facing the power grid infrastructure now and in the future. They explore what's working and what's not in some European countries and if it could be applicable in the US, as well as other potential ways to start attacking this immense problem. The views expressed in this podcast represent the individuals who share them and are not necessarily those of Eagle Eye Power Solutions, LLC. Highlights: 06:07 We've got what we've got coming. This really is a perfect storm when you think about it. We’ve got an aging infrastructure, really aging infrastructure, we've got aging power plants, money hasn't been spent, we have changing weather patterns, we also have a drive to rely more and more on renewable energy.  20:05 The first major thing we get changed is that people need to start looking at how the return of investment will be the improvement in reliability at less cost and loss of service.  26:57 One of the things in the United States that is different from Europe is their electrical reliability is a lot more superior, not because they do things better, not because they have better people, but because a lot of their utilities are underground. 35:55 I've been a proponent of micro nuclear plants for quite a while. You move the power source closer to the end user.  37:50  One thing I've always been curious about, maybe it's just me but, why isn't there more push for hydro?  42:43 All batteries using anodes and cathodes are effectively a metal of some kind because that's the way the atomic system works; the only way you get free electrons is to have a conductor and they're all metals. In order to build a lot of this stuff you're gonna be doing a lot of mining, and isn't that pollution? 47:42  When it comes to transmission and getting power to the coast and you’re talking about these micro grids. I really think that it's a potential path because some of the biggest things we see are like the “not in my backyard” movement . Contact information: (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
UPS Applications and Battery Failure
Feb 2 2022
UPS Applications and Battery Failure
In today's episode, we talk about UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) applications and improvements that can be made based on seasoned expertise from George and Allen. The Battery Blarney duo talks about how UPS was initially used and the pitfalls of using it over the years. They talk about the problems with the batteries, the kind of lead used, their experience with it, maintenance and so much more.  In the second segment, they are joined by industry expert and friend Al Warner, who has been involved in the UPS industry for 37 years. They talk about the several types of UPSs and which is the most reliable. They debate if UPSs are battery-friendly and what their problems are.  Highlights 12:41 In the last 10-15 years, there has been a major push to actually raise the operating temperature of the data room because they say the computers can operate at a much higher temp and that will reduce the cooling.  13:45  When they introduced lead acid batteries, so-called sealed maintenance-free batteries, which we know are either sealed or maintenance-free. 17:24 In my opinion, all stationary batteries should use virgin lead.  19:39 The big problem we have is that theoretically if you remove the charge, you then will not be causing the rate of corrosion. The only trouble is depending on how long you remove the charge from the battery, you will get into self-discharge and that's sufficient to do damage to the battery overtime.  22:08 I'd like to move on to the fact that maintenance nightmares are another aspect of UPS battery designs. 39:51 I think flow charging is a disgrace to the UPS industry because it promotes positive grid corrosion. Contact information: (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Myths and Facts About Lead Acid Batteries
Jan 19 2022
Myths and Facts About Lead Acid Batteries
David and Andrew welcome industry experts George and Allen to set the record straight on lead acid batteries. They talk about the origin and history of batteries, including French physicist Gaston Plante and his invention of the rechargeable battery. George and Allen discuss battery life span and challenges with different battery types over the years as well as the importance of the maintenance of the battery and understanding why batteries fail. They emphasize that maintenance and treating the battery properly is the key to battery reliability. Highlights: 08:14 Lead is a very soft material and in the initial lead acid batteries they used pure lead plates, but these proved to be somewhat cumbersome and didn’t like to be moved.  10:10 This led to the fact that there was a little bit of a divide between North America and the rest of the world with respect to technologies to use.  12:19 They still had the problem with the positive plate growth. Once again, these batteries had to be very carefully charged because if they were overcharged, it gassed. 18:39 With valve regulated lead acid batteries, adhering to the same standard for length of service, what we found out very quickly was that the 10-year life battery, which was probably the one that was launched first, wasn't performing.  25:30 That’s probably the biggest challenge we have is getting people to understand the environmental conditions under which these batteries are being operated is key to their life.  33:14 People have to make sure that the battery is charged at the charge voltage recommended by the manufacturer, not by the ups company, not by the charger company, otherwise you’re going to have problems, big problems.  42:09 There is no single measurement that you take that tells you the status of the battery. It’s a combination of all the measurements, and their interaction and how they are behaving at the time. Contact information: (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources
Jan 5 2022
Renewables and Alternative Energy Sources
In this episode of the DC Power Hour Podcast, we learn about renewables and alternative energy sources. In the Battery Blarney segment, industry experts George Pedersen and Allan Byrne dive into talking about different topics from solar farms, a combination of sources, alternatives and much more.  In the second segment, we are joined by Jack Andreasen, who is the Manager of Industrial Decarbonization Policy at (Breakthrough Energy). He touches on topics regarding building decarbonization, increase in transmission deployment, transmission lines and more.  Episode Highlights 2:49 If you look at some reports, renewables are going to take over a whole generation of the power grid, which is not possible at the moment.  5:13 I think the thing that most people don't understand is that when you generate electricity, when you cause that electro reaction, the way you start moving atoms around charging atoms, so you get charged ions to create your power, you can’t get rid of it, it's got to be used. 8:14 The environmentalist wants all this solar power and wind power. What's that actually doing to the environment? 13:57 In most places in the world, if you have a combination of both wind and solar, you get a much more consistent power source. You combine the two together. 20:23 I think it's going to be a mixture of everything, we're going to have renewable energy, whether we like it or not. 23:06 Education is something as you're realizing, something very dear to my heart at the present moment, but it’s hard work because people come in with preconceived ideas now and somehow, for some reason, scientific facts are no longer the driving force behind anything. 35:18 We don't have to build huge networks or distribution to try and support it because one of the things that people should realize is that the network power in those transmission lines that we crisscross the countryside, are also very vulnerable to attack.  39:58 The problem is that we live in a world today where we want a simple answer that will cover everything and that's not the way the world is, it's never been the way the world is. 47:23 One of the advantages of gases is that it’s easier to transport than anything else. 58:34 We work with Congress, we work with the private sector, we work with other NGOs and think tanks to develop strategies and policy recommendations around ways we think we could decarbonize those various industries. 1:02:55 One thing that could really unlock the potential across the country is an increase in transmission deployment. 1:05:27 Transmission has been, and will continue to be a huge obstacle in renewable energy deployment going forward. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Battcon Recap
Dec 15 2021
Battcon Recap
In this episode of DC Power Hour, we have a panel of round table experts to talk about the most recent Battcon event. Allan Byrne, George Pedersen and Erik Knudston discuss their experience and process the whole event.  The whole team dive deep into the conversation and share their thoughts and opinions on the event. The Battcon Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show covers the latest industry trends and how to apply the best practices to manufacturing, safety, selection, installation and use of stationary batteries.  Episode Highlights: 5:30 Battcon is an international conference with people coming from all over the world to the conference which is a very good platform.  8:45 Unlike any other conference I’ve spoken at, they are far more thorough and stricter on the speakers.  11:30 One of the major things I’ve noticed throughout the entirety of the show is how engaged the people were that were actually there.  17:00 I actually do believe that we do have some disruptive technologies that are coming along. The most interesting fact about it is though, that they're not actually new technologies. They're very old technologies. They just were learning how to make the chemistry work. 19:00 There are a lot of experts there and I really am appreciative that a lot of it was non-commercialized, not pitched towards a specific product. 31:32 One of the things about the background as well, is that it's one of the few conferences where the list of attendees is not made public, and attendees love that because it means that you don't have every salesman in the universe sending them information after the conference.  39:36 There’s more than the interactive consideration as well, we do want to be an interactive conference.  Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Industry Disruptors
Dec 1 2021
Industry Disruptors
In this episode’s Battery Blarney segment, George Pedersen and Allen Byrne talk with hosts David Neubert and Andrew Charlton about their take on innovative technology that is shaking up the industry. They discuss information about innovation in the battery world from valve regulated lead acid batteries to lithium-ion batteries. They also share their opinion on the importance of recycling these batteries and the charging system.  On the second segment of the show, Andrew continues the conversation with Alex Smith who is the Chief Technology Officer at a startup company called Moxion. They talk about the replacement for temporary power for diesel generators which is what the company is trying to build.  Episode Highlights: 2:37 The problem we have is, it’s not that we don’t have innovation in the battery world, but the biggest problem is that the industries are very slow to accept anything that hasn’t been around for 20 years.  7:26 You can call it disrupter but it was simply the evolution to meet a requirement.  13:45 I think there are a lot of limitations with what they’re going to be able to do.  14:34 The maintenance on the lithium-ion batteries is not that stable at the moment but the big thing about them is this alone is a lot of development.  22:38 Maintenance is a challenge for a lot of industries at the moment.  29:22 One of the things he predicted is the use of Wireless Transmission of Power.  33:04 One of the biggest challenges in the industry is to find some way of recycling lithium-ion batteries the best way.  53:37 Interview with Alex Smith 56:17 We really started with the temporary power need. Is the technology mature enough to provide a temporary power supply that can run long enough, be transportable and economical? Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
The Pros and Cons of Electric Vehicles
Nov 17 2021
The Pros and Cons of Electric Vehicles
In this episode of DC Power Hour, we learn about the impact of electric vehicles on the power industry. Industry experts George Pedersen and Allan Byrne hold a spirited debate on the pros and cons of Electric Vehicles in the Battery Blarney segment. They discuss the safety of lithium batteries, the environmental impact of alternative energy sources, and infrastructure changes needed to accommodate electric vehicle charging in the home.  Then, hosts David Neubert and Andrew Carlton speak with Jeff Springer, Manager of Innovation and Efficient Electrification at Dairyland Power Cooperative. They talk about all things EV in the electrical grid, renewable energy credits, and innovations in consumer charging stations in homes and public spaces. Episode Highlights 01:32 They’re with us whether we like it or not. 04:24 There’s a natural reluctance to change as part of this.  06:04 I think people are starting to look in different directions at the moment because of the sometimes deserved, sometimes not deserved, problems with lithium batteries.  08:15 These goals are set with no consideration of technology; with no consideration of public acceptance. 12:16 How do you charge this (electric vehicle), where’s the power coming from? Nine times out of 10 it’s coming from a fossil fuel power plant.  15:59 We’re not just talking about a product here; we’re talking about an entire infrastructure change in what America currently is and what it needs to be.  18:45 They (solar and wind) are not a good method of producing that baseline power that we require to produce that power we need for our everyday living resources.    29:25 CHARGE - provides charging infrastructure both in people’s homes and in rural areas where public charging is needed but no one else seems to be building any. 43:51 The growth of EV’s has been relatively slow up until this point, but we do anticipate it taking off. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Equipment Redundancy
Nov 3 2021
Equipment Redundancy
In this episode of the DC Power Hour podcast, we learn about equipment redundancy. In the Battery Blarney segment, industry experts George Pedersen and Allan Byrne explain what it is, why it is important, and what applications it pertains to. They discuss their experience in the telecom industry and the evolution from redundant chargers to redundant battery systems. Today, the utility industry recognizes that redundancy is essential to maintain the electrical supply. In the second segment, David Neubert welcomes Dennis Martini, an engineering technical consultant from Dominion Energy. George speaks with Dennis about equipment redundancy in DC substation systems and how Dominion Energy has prepared for potential loss of power with a high level of redundancy.  Episode Highlights 1:42 As the industry evolved, UPS’s started coming on the market. 3:20 On my first visit to a substation, to say I was shocked was an understatement. There was a substation controlling quite a large area for people in that area and it had a single battery and a single charger. 4:37 We have a lot of substations in this country and it’s going to take a long time to get them all up to speed and meet the requirements of the new standard. 5:39  When you talk about redundancy, you’re not just talking about a redundant charger, you’re not just talking about a redundant battery. You’ve got to look at the whole system. 12:36  When you start looking at redundancy within the utilities, one of the challenges has been there simply isn’t enough space to add another battery. A 120 volt battery is quite large. 17:53 If you’ve lost the ability to charge them, you’ve only got the run time of the battery, that’s all you’ve got before you have complete failure. 26:30 Dennis- We’ll use them (secondary chargers) in a load-sharing capacity so they're both on all the time, but the one is there in case one were to fail. We also do it in locations where we need quicker recharge time. 27:48 We also have battery trailers that are outfitted with chargers and a whole set of batteries. If we got into a bind, we strategically place them throughout our system on stand-by.   Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail
Why Battery Monitoring?
Oct 20 2021
Why Battery Monitoring?
In this episode’s Battery Blarney segment, George Pedersen and Allen Byrne talk with hosts David Neubert and Andrew Charlton about why Battery Monitoring is important. They discuss artificial intelligence, or machine learning, and the new role it plays in replicating the work of battery technicians. Routine maintenance is a must for success. Andrew continues the conversation with industry expert Nigel Scott who offers an engineering perspective on battery monitoring and what has - and hasn’t - changed over the years. According to Nigel, the point of a battery monitoring system is to avoid trouble.  Episode Highlights 07:16 If you could only look at a couple of things about a battery, what would you look at? Overwhelmingly two of the top items were: battery temperature and battery charge current. 14:24 Getting accurate measurements off the battery is probably the biggest challenge the manufacturers of monitors have. 18:03 The key to making and achieving good results with machine learning is the ability to collect a lot of data and analyze all that data.  19:14 The machine can replicate a thousand battery technicians by just looking at a whole data set, but it needs to know what to look at. 23:32 You can not 100% totally rely on battery monitoring as the only source of information. You still need to inspect the battery on a regular basis. 33:55 Interview with Andrew Charlton and Nigel Scott 37:56 The goal of a user who buys a battery monitoring system is to avoid difficulties if and when a battery should fail. 40:36 If you just present raw data to a customer - especially a customer with a lot of systems - you’re asking for trouble. Contact information (Eagle Eye)  E-mail