PODCAST

Cold War Conversations

Ian Sanders

Award winning real stories of the Cold War told by those that were there. We're capturing the unknown stories of the Cold War before they are lost...
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1- Cold War Conversations Trailer
Tales of a West German football fan in the Soviet bloc (219)
You will remember Karl-Heinz from our episode  218 where he talked about being a signaller on the West German destroyer "Hamburg" in the late 70s. Today we follow his post navy life as a travelling supporter of football club HSV Hamburg where he followed them all over the Soviet bloc talks about watching them play Dynamo Berlin the Stasi side and drinking with Liverpool, Newcastle and Hamburg legend Kevin Keegan in a hotel bar in Tiblisi. And his Cold War encounters don’t stop there. While working in Chile he met General Pinochet, the military dictator of Chile from 1973 to 1990  and living across the street from Margot Honecker the wife of East German leader Erich Honecker who was also an influential member of that country's Communist regime until 1989.If you have listened this far, I know you are enjoying the podcasts so I’m asking for one-off or monthly donations to support my work and enable me to continue producing the podcast. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you, audio and other extras as well as basking in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.I am delighted to welcome Karl-Heinz to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information on this episode here including videos here . https://coldwarconversations.com/episode219/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Today
34 mins
Serving on the West German destroyer "Hamburg" (218)
Karl-Heinz served in the Bundesmarine as a Signalman on the West German destroyer "Hamburg" in the late 70s. He talks of his training, his role and shares details of manoeuvres in the North Sea and Baltics involving East German and Soviet ships.He also speaks about a cruise to West Africa where the sailors were briefed to stay away from any East German merchant marine sailors and not to engage with them in any form – he and his mates didn’t keep to the rules…If you have listened this far, I know you are enjoying the podcasts so I’m asking for one-off or monthly donations to support my work and enable me to continue producing the podcast. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you, audio and other extras as well as basking in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Karl-Heinz to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information on this episode in our show notes here. https://coldwarconversations.com/episode218/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
1w ago
32 mins
The CIA director responsible for creating spy devices (217)Vietnam War draftee to US Army Rangers (216)Helping the Refuseniks (215)
Refusenik was an unofficial term for individuals—typically, but not exclusively, Soviet Jews—who were denied permission to emigrate, primarily to Israel, by the authorities of the Soviet Union and other countries of the Eastern bloc. The term refusenik is derived from the "refusal" handed down to a prospective emigrant from the Soviet authorities.Eric Hochstein was a staff member for Senator Carl Levin of Michigan working on human rights. Human rights were a big issue for Senator Levin. Eric went as part of a standard commercial tour of the SU for two weeks from Sep 28th,1980, where he visited Moscow, Kharkiv, Kyiv, Odessa, and Leningrad. Eric and his colleagues used this trip to peel off and visit various Refusenik families to bring them news, messages and supplies. Only protected by a US passport and a tourist visa Eric travelled by public transport under surveillance from the KGB carrying supplies for the families included Levi jeans which were better than money in the Soviet Union of the 1980s.  I could really use your support to help me to capture and preserve these amazing stories of the Cold War. If you could make either a one-off or better still sign up to monthly donations to help me to find the time to produce and finance the project.If you’d like to know more just go to cwc.com/donateIf you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Peter Ryan is your host today and I am delighted to welcome Eric Hochstein to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode215Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Jan 1 2022
45 mins
Eyewitness to the 1991 Soviet Coup with Brett Elliott (214)
Today’s episode is different. Brett Elliott died earlier this year and I was contacted by his ex-wife Polly who offered me a cassette tape. Polly and Brett had met in college and got to know each other in Russian Club at Oklahoma State. In the summer of 1991, they went to Moscow to pursue Polly’s goal of being a reporter in Russia and Brett’s goal of further studying Russia. They both worked together covering the Bush Gorbachev summit, with Polly as a reporter and Brett as an interpreter. Polly left Russia early, but Brett stayed a few weeks more and witnessed the collapse of the Soviet Union, August 19-21, 1991. During a rare phone call, Polly begged him to be careful, and he famously said she was worse than the coup leaders if she wanted to deny him getting out to witness history…Polly's book is available on the links belowUS Listeners https://amzn.to/3mEuPMaUK listeners https://amzn.to/3CLuHjyWe have photos here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode214/This podcast relies on listener support to enable me to continue to capture these incredible stories and make them available for free. You can support my work and help to preserve Cold War history via one-off or monthly donationsJust go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/  for more details.Do join our Facebook discussion group where the cold war conversation continues between episodes. Just search Cold War Conversations on Facebook.This episode is the audio from the cassette of Brett describing his experiences just two weeks after the coup. Being on cassette the sound quality is not great, but I am delighted and honoured to welcome Brett Elliott to our Cold War conversation…Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Dec 25 2021
46 mins
Working in the nuclear missile compartment of a Royal Navy Polaris submarine (213)
Dec 18 2021
44 mins
British Army "stay behinds"  the Special OP Troop (212)
I speak with Colin Ferguson a veteran from the British Army‘s covert  Special Observation Post Troop which was founded in 1982.The "stay behind" Special OP Troop consisted of selected soldiers in 6 man patrols whose task was to dig in large underground hides known as "mexe" shelters along the inner German border. They would then allow the main Soviet forces to pass over them before deploying to two smaller observation posts (Ops)  where they would engage the enemy with the long-range guns and rockets of the British Army.Colin, covers in detail, selection, training and deployment as well as how the mexes were constructed.  Do check out Colin’s podcast, “The Unconventional Soldier”  which offers first-hand accounts of past conflicts, military history, book and film reviews, plus guests, dits and digressionThis podcast relies on listener support to enable me to continue to capture these incredible stories and make them available for free. You can support my work and help to preserve Cold War history via one off or monthly donationsJust go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/for more details.Do join our Facebook discussion group where the cold war conversation continues between episodes. This episode is dedicated to remembering two members of the Special Op Troop. Lance Bombardier Steve Cummins, who is pictured on the episode cover and Gunner Miles Amos who lost their lives in 1989 when their vehicle struck a mine near Londonderry. We thank them for their service.I am delighted and honoured to welcome Colin Ferguson to our Cold War conversation…There are photos and further info here. https://coldwarconversations.com/episode212/Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Dec 11 2021
1 hr 16 mins
A Cold War childhood in Albania (211)
Lea Ypi grew up in one of the most isolated countries on earth, a place where communist ideals had officially replaced religion. Albania, the last Stalinist outpost in Europe, was almost impossible to visit, almost impossible to leave. It was a place of queuing and scarcity, of political executions and secret police. To Lea, it was home. People were equal, neighbours helped each other, and children were expected to build a better world. There was community and hope.Then, in December 1990, a year after the fall of the Berlin Wall, everything changed. The statues of Stalin and Hoxha were toppled. Almost overnight, people could vote freely, wear what they liked and worship as they wished. There was no longer anything to fear from prying ears. But factories shut, jobs disappeared and thousands fled to Italy on crowded ships, only to be sent back. Predatory pyramid schemes eventually bankrupted the country, leading to violent conflict. As one generation's aspirations became another's disillusionment, and as her own family's secrets were revealed, Lea found herself questioning what freedom really meant.Free is an engrossing memoir of coming of age amid political upheaval. With acute insight and wit, Lea Ypi traces the limits of progress and the burden of the past, illuminating the spaces between ideals and reality, and the hopes and fears of people pulled up by the sweep of history.Buy the book and support the podcastUK buyers  https://amzn.to/2ZVgRx4US buyers https://amzn.to/3psOkr8Now time doesn’t come free and I’m asking listeners to support my work recording these incredible stories via a small (or large)l donation. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook. SchattenbergI am delighted to welcome Lea Ypi  to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode210/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Dec 3 2021
57 mins
The Cold War handshake in the heavens - the Apollo-Soyuz mission (210)
On 17 July 1975 the first manned international space mission, carried out jointly by the United States and the Soviet Union. Millions of people around the world watched on television as a United States Apollo module docked with a Soviet Union Soyuz capsule. The project, and its memorable handshake in the heavens, was a symbol of détente between the two superpowers during the Cold War, and it is generally considered to mark the end of the Space Race.Unthinkable only years earlier the Apollo–Soyuz mission was made possible by the thaw Soviet-US relations. According to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, "The Soviet and American spacemen will go up into outer space for the first major joint scientific experiment in the history of mankind. They know that from outer space our planet looks even more beautiful. It is big enough for us to live peacefully on it, but it is too small to be threatened by nuclear war.”Our guest is Cold War Conversations favourite, author Stephen Walker, the author of Beyond: The Astonishing Story of the First Human to Leave Our Planet and Journey into Space.Buy the book here and support CWC UK https://amzn.to/3wOBZRI US https://amzn.to/30vgsld Do check out our two previous episodes with Stephen.  Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode172/ and the Forgotten Cosmonaut here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode192/I’m asking listeners to support my work and enable me to continue recording these incredible stories. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.I am delighted to welcome Stephen Walker back to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode210/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Nov 27 2021
1 hr 12 mins
Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev - aspiring actor and poetry fan (209)
Now, what do you think of when you hear the name Leonid Brezhnev who ruled the Soviet Union for 18 years from the 1960s to the 1980s? An old guy waving weakly from the Lenin mausoleum?Well, think again! We speak with Susanne Schattenberg, the author of a new biography that systematically dismantles the stereotypical and one-dimensional view of Brezhnev as the stagnating Stalinist by drawing on a wealth of archival research and documents not previously studied in English. The Brezhnev that emerges is a complex one, from his early apolitical years, as an aspiring actor and poetry fan, through his swift and surprising rise through the Party ranks. We talk about his hitherto misunderstood role in Khrushchev's ousting and appointment as his successor, to his somewhat pro-Western foreign policy aims, deft consolidation and management of power, and ultimate descent into addiction and untimely death. For Schattenberg, this is the story of a flawed and ineffectual idealist - for the West, this biography makes a convincing case that Brezhnev should be reappraised as one of the most interesting and important political figures of the twentieth century.Buy the book here and support CWC  UK https://amzn.to/3kCUaVn US https://amzn.to/3c9fOvZNow time doesn’t come free and I’m asking listeners to support my work recording these incredible stories via a small (or large)l donation. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.I am delighted to welcome Susanne Schattenberg to our Cold War conversation…Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Nov 14 2021
56 mins
Born into a family of  Canadian Communists (208)
Fred Weir was a third-generation red diaper baby from Toronto and a long-time member of the  Communist Party. His uncle, trained at the Lenin School in Moscow in the 1920s as an agent of the Communist International, the Comintern and spent many years in the USSR.Fred had visited a few times, had studied Russian history up to the graduate level, but never wanted to live there until Gorbachev came to power in 1985. The new general secretary, the party’s first to be born after the revolution, talked, unlike any Communist leader since the original Bolsheviks. Suddenly, there was the electrifying prospect of socialism powered from below, a system focused on creative human potential rather than crop statistics. Now I know some of you skip this bit, but if you want to continue hearing these Cold War stories I’m asking listeners to pledge a monthly donation of at least $4, £3 or €3 per month to help keep the podcast on the air, although larger amounts are welcome too. If you donate monthly via Patreon or Buy Me a Coffee you will get the sought after CWC coaster and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Fred Weir to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information here. https://coldwarconversations.com/episode208/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated Our Book List Help Support the podcast by shopping at Amazon. Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Nov 13 2021
1 hr 2 mins
Berlin: Capital of Spies (207)
For almost half a century, the hottest front in the Cold War was right across Berlin. From summer 1945 until 1990, spying was part of everyday life in both East and West Berlin.I speak with historian Bernd von Kostka of the Allied Museum in Berlin-Dahlem who has co-authored with Sven Felix Kellerhoff the book Capital of Spies: Intelligence agencies in Berlin during the Cold War recently published by Casemate.The book describes the spectacular successes and failures of the various secret services based in the city and in this episode we will concentrate on one of the chapters detailing the work of the various Allied listening stations. Buy "Capital of Spies" and support the podcast hereUK Listeners https://amzn.to/3mFb3jKUS Listeners https://amzn.to/3waLwSLThis podcast relies on listener support to enable me to continue to capture these incredible stories and make them available for free. You can support my work and help to preserve Cold War history via one off or monthly donationsJust go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/for more details.Do join our Facebook discussion group where the cold war conversation continues between episodes. Just search Cold War Conversations on Facebook.I am delighted and honoured to welcome back Bernd von Kostka to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode207/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Nov 6 2021
51 mins
How a Soviet conscript became a NATO General (206)
In 1985, an eighteen-year-old named Riho Terras arrived at the Soviet armed forces’ large conscript assessment facility in Tallinn obeying his conscription orders.Little did he know that 26 years later he would be a NATO General.Riho shares his experiences in the Soviet Navy with us in some detail. We hear about his service on the Soviet frigate Zadornyy including trips to the Mediterranean and Cuba as well as monitoring NATO warships.Riho also shares his experiences of Estonian independence and the challenges of converting the country into an independent nation.I’m extremely grateful to Elisabeth Braw, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute who facilitated this interview via her  Englebert Ideas essay.Thanks to all of you for listening to the podcast.  It is an absolute passion for me to save these stories from being forgotten and sharing them weekly for free for everyone to hear. Whilst this is a passion, I am asking if each listener could make either a one-off or better still sign up for monthly donations to help me to find the time to produce and finance the project.If you’d like to know more just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Riho Terras to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information about this episode here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode206/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Oct 29 2021
58 mins
Terrorism in the Cold War (205)
I talk with the writers and editors of Terrorism in the Cold War a new two volume book that uses a wide range of case studies including Polish Military Intelligence and Its Secret Relationship with the Abu Nidal Organization and Gladio – Myth and Reality: The Origins and Function of Stay Behind in the Case of Post-war Austria. The book sheds new light on the relations between state and terrorist actors, allowing for a fresh and much more insightful assessment of the contacts, dealings, agreements and collusion with terrorist organizations undertaken by state actors on both sides of the Iron Curtain.You will learn that these state-terrorism relationships were not only much more ambiguous than much of the older literature had suggested but are, in fact, crucial for the understanding of global political history in the Cold War era.If you are enjoying the podcast I could use some support to enable me to continue recording these incredible stories. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.There's more in the episode notes here coldwarconversations.com/episode205/I am delighted to welcome Thomas Riegler,  Przemyslaw Gasztold and Adrian Hänni to our Cold War conversation…Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Oct 22 2021
56 mins
Emanuela - a Cold War Romanian Childhood (204)
Emanuela Grama was born in the mid-1970s’ in a small provincial town in Eastern Romania. She provides us with a great insight into life in the Romanian provinces during the 1980s. Emanuela lived in a small two-bedroom flat and tells of her parents working in a factory while her grandparents looked after her.Her father listened secretly to Radio Free Europe and collected stamps so he could legitimately write to people in the West.Her parents told her not to talk at school about what was said at home and to be very careful what she said to friends.Emanuela vividly recalls the day the revolution started in 1989, Emanuela was at home alone and she described the instant atmosphere of change and the weeks and months after. We also hear about Emanuela’s book, Socialist Heritage: The Politics of Past and Place in Romania which traces the transformation of Bucharest’s Old Town district where under socialism, politicians and professionals used the district’s historic buildings to emphasize the city’s Romanian past and erase its ethnically diverse history.I’m asking listeners to support my work and enable me to continue recording these incredible stories. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode, visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations on Facebook. Further details , including photos are in our episode notes at https://coldwarconversations.com/episode204/James Chilcott is our host and I am delighted to welcome James and Emanuela to our Cold War conversation…Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Oct 15 2021
1 hr
Pete - a BRIXMIS driver behind enemy lines in East Germany (203)
Pete Curran served with BRIXMIS, the British Military Liaison Mission in East Germany. Their operation was established by a post-WWII Allied occupation forces' agreement, where British, US and French missions had relative freedom to travel and collect intelligence throughout East Germany from 1947 until 1990.  Pete’s story starts with details of his vetting interview, driver training, and his first tour in East Germany. We also hear of the intelligence scoops he was involved in and some of his close scrapes while evading both the Soviets and the Stasi including one with a Soviet helicopter.We also hear of the role of the driver in the three-man teams, the incredible camaraderie of the unit, as well as the pressure on their loved ones. I know from my stats that a lot of you really enjoy the podcast. It is an absolute passion for me to save these stories from being forgotten and sharing them weekly for free for everyone to hear. Whilst this is a passion, I am asking if each listener could make either a one-off or better still sign up for monthly donations to help me to find the time to produce and finance the project.If you’d like to know more just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Pete Curran to our Cold War conversation…UK BRIXMIS books https://amzn.to/3ljkK6IUS BRIXMIS books  https://amzn.to/3ae2HZsThere’s further information including videos here. https://coldwarconversations.com/episode203If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Oct 8 2021
56 mins
MKUltra -  the CIA’s mind control project & the mysterious death of Frank Olson (202)
Frank Olson was an American bacteriologist, biological warfare scientist, and employee of the United States Army Biological Warfare Laboratories. In 1953 at a meeting in rural Maryland, he was covertly dosed with LSD by his boss Sidney Gottlieb, who was the head of the CIA's MKUltra mind control program.Nine days later, Olson plunged to his death from the window of the Hotel Statler. The U.S. government first described his death as a suicide, and then as misadventure, while others allege murder.  The story was made into the Netflix film "Wormwood".I speak with Paul Vidich, the acclaimed author of The Coldest Warrior, An Honorable Man,  The Good Assassin and The Mercenary. He is also the nephew of Frank Olson. UK link to Paul Vidich BooksUS link to Paul Vidich BooksThis podcast relies on listener support to enable me to continue to capture these incredible stories and make them available for free. You can support my work and help to preserve Cold War history via one-off or monthly donationsJust go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/  for more details.If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Paul Vidich to our Cold War conversation…Further information on this episode https://coldwarconversations.com/episode202/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Oct 1 2021
58 mins
Flying into nuclear mushroom clouds (201)
Squadron Leader John Robinson AFC (ret’d) was an RAF pilot who was tasked to fly into the mushroom clouds of nuclear bomb tests to capture samples at Operation Buffalo at Maralinga in 1956, and Operation Grapple, at Christmas Island in 1957. He tells of his recruitment into RAF, initial training and his cloud sampling missions as well his experiences of watching the tests from as little as five miles away. It is reckoned that over 22,000 British servicemen participated in the British and American nuclear tests and clean-ups between 1952-1965, along with scientists from the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment and civilians. The majority of men have passed away, and around a tenth of the men remain.I was honoured that the British Nuclear Test Veterans Association (BNVTA) invited me to their annual reunion and enabled me to capture some of their veterans’ stories. I could really use your help to support my work and enable me to continue producing the podcast. If you become a monthly supporter, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome John Robinson to our Cold War conversation…There’s further information including videos on this link https://coldwarconversations.com/episode201/If you can’t wait for next week’s episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Support the show (https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/)
Sep 24 2021
54 mins
Life in the underground Soviet music scene Part 3 (200)

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