What’s Your Therapy?

Natalie McIvor

A podcast exploring and dispelling the myths around therapy. What is therapy? How does it work? What is the right therapy? Through conversation with practitioners it will look at different types of modalities and approaches that can support well-being and mental health.

What is family therapy? with Psychotherapist Jo Culver
Nov 23 2022
What is family therapy? with Psychotherapist Jo Culver
In this week's episode I talk to Jo Culver, a Family and Systemic Psychotherapist. With experience in both CAMHS and private practice Jo talks to us about a range of issues that can impact a family and how she works with the family unit.We discuss:what actually is family therapy?the impact of the pandemic on adolescents and young peoplehow people can communicate differently within familiesthe importance of considering different perspectives with in the family unithow you can counsel angerclients being experts in themselvesworking with neurodiversityattachmentThis episode will help you to consider the dynamics of working within family units and the impact that can be made.About Jo:Jo is a Family and Systemic Psychotherapist, often referred to as a Family Therapist. This means that she work with families, couples and individuals. Her professional background is within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, (CAMHS), where she has worked for nineteen years, and continues to work there; as part of the Family Therapy team. Her professional background before completing her Family Therapy training was as a CAMHS Social Worker, where she worked systemically with families, often having complex backgrounds with safeguarding and mental health issues within the family. Jo currently works with families where their child / young person experiences mental health issues. These include issues such as Anxiety, Depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Self-harming behaviour, Eating issues, Trauma, Gender dysphoria, and Attachment. She also work with families where there are neurodevelopmental issues such as Autistic Spectrum Condition and Attentional issues.Contact Jo here:
006 Building Trust, Grounding and Rastafarianism with Joshua le 'Mon
Jun 7 2022
006 Building Trust, Grounding and Rastafarianism with Joshua le 'Mon
In this week's episode I talk to Josh Le Mon who has a wide range of experiences in different sectors working with children, young people and adults. We talk about the importance of building trust with young people to build the counselling relationship, the importance of grounding techniques and the difference between working with male and female young people. We discuss what impact the pandemic has had on people he works with who have autism and how it has also impacted how young people chose to engage with him. Josh also shares his story of what drew him to work in therapy and his upbringing within Rastafarianism.  This is such an insightful discussion.About Josh:I am a registered member of the BACP with over 10 years of experience in the mental health profession. I have had the privilege of working with a wide range of people, such as: young people, older people, adults, and families. I have worked in settings such as: schools, college’s, charities, and communities with people from differing social, economic, and cultural backgrounds. As a result, I have experience of working with issues such as: Trauma, Addiction, Family dynamics, Depression, Anxiety, Adverse Childhood Experience’s and more. Alongside working privately, I currently work with a local authority supporting families to help improve mental health, through the way they relate to each other. In addition, I volunteer for a charity providing long and short-term counselling to adults and older people via face to face, virtual or via telephone.I use an integrative relational approach that has 2 main elements, which include: How past experiences and/or relationships is impacting on present day life. And whether one is currently living life true to how they want to live their life. Through discourse, I work by exploring what is preventing someone from living a life that is authentic to them.Website:
004 Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Within the NHS with Kerry Pilbeam
May 25 2022
004 Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Within the NHS with Kerry Pilbeam
In this week’s episode I talk to Kerry Pilbeam whose therapy specialises working with young people. Kerry talks us through the difference between working with adults and young people, how to contract with a young person so that they are clear on confidentiality and also what has to be reported if they share. We discuss dealing with anger from young people and the broadness of that emotion based on the individual. Kerry also shares how she ensures that she looks after her own mental health working in this sector. About Kerry:Kerry initially undertook an Advanced Diploma in Integrative Humanistic Counselling at Guildford College in 2002 which focused on Person-Centred Counselling, Existentialism and Gestalt.  During this course she commenced her placement with an NHS organisation called the Youth Counselling Service and loved it so much she never left.Following a number of years of clinical practice within the Youth Counselling Service and volunteering for a couple of years with Cruse Bereavement Care, Kerry commenced her BA(Hons) in Counselling and Psychotherapy at Southampton University in 2008.  Latterly in response to recognising her therapeutic skills gaps, Kerry completed Dr Margot Sunderland’s IATE Certificate in CBT with Children and Young People, and then Compassion Focused Therapy with IPT, as well as a host of other courses.  Kerry considers CPD vital to her journey and in meeting the needs of the young people she’s fortunate enough to work alongside. Kerry keeps a small clinical caseload of young people and manages Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust CAMHS Intensive Intervention Team for South West Surrey as well as the Youth Counselling Service.Website: www.mindworks-surrey.org
003 Drum n Bounce with Emma Smallman
May 18 2022
003 Drum n Bounce with Emma Smallman
In this episode I speak with Emma Smallman who created Drum n Bounce, a fitness class with a drum and bass soundtrack. Emma talks to us about the impact of fitness on mental health and how important this became during the pandemic and also silent disco classes. We discuss the importance of inclusivity giving access to a wide range of people and her journey to studying trauma informed yoga and the prison yoga project.  Learn how trauma impacts your nervous system, how trauma informed yoga can support healing and the power of somatic practices. Emma’s energy is powerful and she has so much to share with us. About Emma:Emma Smallman, based in Birmingham and originally from up north with a few strings to her bow. As a qualified Exercise to Music instructor she created ‘drum n bounce & dubstretch fitness’ back in 2012. Drum n Bounce is an uplifting dance fitness class to drum & bass music designed to bring joy to people, along with all the wonderful physical and mental health benefits of an exercise class. Over the last 10 years she has taught weekly fitness classes as well as taking drum n bounce to events nationally including music festivals such as Shambala, Nozstock, Bestival, Boomtown, Deer Shed, Wonderfields, Mostly Jazz, Lunar and Magical to name but a few. Emma’s passion is about bringing people together, creating joyful experiences and supporting people to connect with their bodies. In 2017 Emma qualified as a Real Flow Yoga teacher and last year added to that with a 200 hour Trauma Informed Yoga Teacher Training with the Prison Yoga Project. This Yoga, Social Justice and Leadership training enables her to serve an even wider range of individuals by offering movement to those in recovery from substance misuse, women who have experienced domestic abuse, people coming out of prison and also chair yoga to those who have mobility issues. Alongside this Emma is an actor and facilitator for Geese Theatre Company. She has worked for the charity since 2009 whose remit is to work within the criminal justice system and with social welfare issues using the arts as a vehicle for individual change.Website: www.drumnbounce.co.ukInstagram: @drumnbounceFacebook: @drumnbounce